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2016
12-06

英译日本古籍目录 Premodern Japanese Texts and Translations

 

This bibliography covers texts written in Japan before the year 1600. The focus is on literary prose and poetry, but the bibliography also attempts to cover writings of importance for the study of Japanese religion, history, or culture generally. It began as a database of translations into English and other Western languages, but now includes entries for works not yet translated as well as some information about electronic texts, ebooks, and scholarly studies. The bibliography consists of a single, large webpage, equivalent to some 170 pages printed, arranged in the alphabetical order of the Japanese titles. There are also some entries for genres (e.g. kōwakamai) and other types of writings (e.g. kanshi, medieval historical writing). Information about nō plays translations can be found elsewhere on this site. In a few cases, it was found easiest to gather works under the name of the author (e.g. Kūkai, Zeami). For further explanation, a list of abbreviations, and acknowledgements, see the editor’s notes

Use the browser FIND command to locate entries, using circumflex where necessary for words with long vowel. You may also find it convenient to browse entries by alphabetical location:
ABCDEFGHIJKMNORSTUWYZ

— Michael Watson (Meiji Gakuin University) 2013.10.11

Formatting issues. Unicode encoding is used. As the circumflex (ôû) is now little used in English-language scholarship on Japan, I have finally switched over to using the macron (ōū). It is hard to be consistent about such matters, as older titles sometimes used the circumflex, while some titles do no mark vowel length at all.Search/replace was done globally. As I re-edit the page, I will gradually restore the circumflex to titles in languages like French that use it.

Hyperlinks. Links on book titles in print are to Amazon, while links on titles of journal articles are to JSTOR, an online database available through most research libraries.  Links marked online are to articles made freely available on web, often in pdf format, such as those published by JJRS (Journal of Japanese Religious Studies).

Ebooks. A growing library of translations from classical Japanese can now be purchased as ebooks for smart phones, computers, or dedicated readers. Links for Kindle editions are being added below, but you may find other electronic editions available. As with any new medium, teething problems have occurred. Hyphenization and verse formatting pose a technical problem in ebooks because of the variety of screen size. What is less excusable is bad copy-editing and poor conversion. When kanji and even macrons appear as graphics rather than as text, one wonders whether to blame publishers for ignorance or laziness in not taking the same care with ebooks as they do with print. Yet these are essentially aesthetic flaws which may affect the pleasure of reading, but do not detract from the many other benefits of the format. As time passes, more and more of us will start havingkey texts both in ebook form and print. (Publishers should consider offering a package deal.)  In discussions about the pros and cons of reading on the screen, there is one benefit that is often overlooked because it is of less importance for general readers. Ebooks allow students and scholars to search the whole text—or our notes—for any word or phrase. In academia, that is one of the most valuable functions that an ebook can offer.


A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – M – N – O – R – S – T – U – W – Y – Z [return to top]

Aisome-gawa 藍染川

  • Muromachi tale. Related to noh play Aizomegawa (1514) and also to the story told in Shichinin bunin (“The Seven Nuns”). Childs, Rethinking Sorrow, 1991, p. 28-.
  • Pigeot, Michiyuki-bun, p. 28 et passim. [Excerpts in French.]
  • Akimichi あきみち

  • Muromachi tale.
  • “Akimichi” tr. in McCullough, Classical Japanese Prose, 1990, pp. 499-509.
  • Childs, Margaret H. “Didacticism in Medieval Short Stories. Hatsuse Monogatari and Akimichi.” MN 42: 3 (1987), 253-288.
  • Text: NKBT 38.
  • Aki no yo no nagamonogatari 秋夜長物語

  • Muromachi tale. “A Long Tale for an Autumn Night.” Tale dating “to at least as early as 1377, in which a monk experiences a religious awakening because of the suicide of an acolyte with home he was in love.” (Childs, Rethinking Sorrow, 26-27). Text: NKBT 38.
  • Childs, Margaret. “Chigo monogatari: Love stories or Buddhist sermons?” MN 35.2 (1987), 127-151. [Complete translation from p. 132]
  • “Longue histoire d’une nuit d’automne,” [extract] in Jacqueline Pigeot, Histoire de Yokobue, 1972, 167-172.
  • Studies: Payne, Richard K. “At Midlife in Medieval Japan.” Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 26/1-2 (1999), 35–57. PDF. // Faure, Bernard. The Red Thread: Buddhist Approaches to Sexuality. Princeton UP, 1998, 241-247.
  • Akizuki monogatari 秋月物語

  • Muromachi tale.
  • Pigeot, Michiyuki-bun, pp. 339-340. [Short excerpt]
  • Pigeot, Jacqueline. “Du mythe au roman populaire – Avatars d’une combinatoire narrative dans le Japan du quinzieme siècle,” Journal Asiatique, CCLXIV, 1-2, 1978, pp. 117-174. [n.s.]
  • Amakusabon Heike monogatari 天草本平家物語

  • Romanized version of Heike monogatari printed in 1592 on the Jesuit Press in Amakusa, Kyushu.
  • e-text ed. H. Shinozaki
  • Amakusabon Esopo monogatari 天草版伊曾保物語 see Esopo no fabulas

    Anegakōji Imashinmei hyakuin 姉小路今神明百韻

  • Linked verse composed in 1447 by renga poets Sōzei, Chiun, Shinkei, Senjun, Ninzei, and eight amateurs.
  • Hare, Thomas W. “Linked Verse at Imashinmei Shrine. Anegakōji Imashinmei Hyakuin, 1447.” MN 34: 2 (1979), 169-208.
  • Ariake no wakare 有明の別れ

  • Late Heian monogatari.
  • Khan, Robert Omar. [Book I, part of Book II, most of Book III] in Ariake no Wakare’: Genre, Gender, and Genealogy in a Late Twelfth-century Monogatari.” Ph.D. dissertation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 1998.
  • Khan, Robert Omar. [Selections tr. as “Partings at Dawn”] in Stephen Miller, ed., Partings at Dawn, 1996, 21-30.
  • Keene, Seeds, 1993, 798-804. [Excerpts included in discussion.]
  • Asagao no tsuyu no miya 朝顔の露の宮

  • Muromachi tale
  • Opening tr. in Pigeot, Michiyuki-bun, 1982, 189.
  • Atsumori 敦盛 (noh play)

  • [see noh-trans page for translation of this noh play and all others]
  • Atsumori 敦盛 (kowaka genre)

  • Araki, The Ballad-Drama of Medieval Japan, 1964, pp. 150-71. Abridged in Brazell, Traditional Japanese Theater, 1998, 295-300.
  • azuma asobi uta 東遊歌

  • early genre of song, principally used in Shinto ritual [NKBD 31]
  • “Suruga Dance” tr. Hiroaki Sato in Sato and Watson, Eight Islands, 1981, p. 154.
  • Azuma kagami 吾妻鏡

  • “Mirror of the East.” Chronicle history of the Genpei War and the Kamakura bakufu.
  • Shinoda, M. The Founding of the Kamakura Shogunate, 1180-1185, with selected translations from the Azuma Kagami. Columbia UP, 1960. [Partial trans. of first five books.]
  • McCullough, William. “The Azuma Kagami Account of the Shōkyū War.” MN 23: 1/2 (1960), 102-155. [Trans. of book 25, concerning year 1221.]
  • azuma uta 東歌

  • “poems from (the provinces) of the East” (“eastern songs”), 330 of which are collected in Man’yōshū, vol. 14
  • Kudaka, Yasuko. Azuma-uta, ou, l’expression de l’amour dans la poesie du VIIIeme siécle au Japon dans le XIVeme livre du Manyô-shû. Paris: Editions You-Feng, 1996.
  • Bownas and Thwaite, Penguin Book of Japanese Verse, 1964, 22.
  • A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – M – N – O – R – S – T – U – W – Y – Z [return to top]
    Baishōron 梅松論 (ca. 1349)

  • Historical tale (rekishi monogatari). Account of Ashikaga shogunate.
  • Uyenaka, Shuzo. “A study of Baishōron, a source for the ideology of imperial loyalism in medieval Japan.” Ph.D. University of Toronto, 1979. [n.s. = not seen][Excerpts. One passage cited in Brownlee, Political Thought, 1991, p. 86.]
  • banka 挽歌

  • genre of elegies (Fr. “poèmes funebres”).
  • Study of genre in cultural context in François Masse, La mort et les funérailles dans le Japon ancien, Paris: POF, 1986.
  • Ben no naishi nikki 弁内侍日記

  • “The Diary of Lady Ben.” Court diary of Ben no Naishi (1228-1270) describing the court of Go-Fukakusa (r. 1246-1259).
  • Hulvey, Shirley Yumiko. Sacred Rites in Midnight: Ben no Naishi Nikki. Cornell East Asia Series No. 122, 2005. 345 p.
  • Hulvey, Shirley Yumiko. “The Nocturnal Muse: Ben no Naishi no Nikki.” MN 44: 4 (1989), 391-413.
    Hulvey, Shirley Yumiko. “The Nocturnal Muse: a Study and Partial Translation of ‘Ben no Naishi Nikki,’ a Thirteenth Century Poetic Diary.” Ph.D. Berkeley, 1989. 
  • e-text ed. H. Shinozaki (GSRJ)
  • Benkei monogatari 弁慶物語

  • Muromachi tale
  • Sieffert, René. Histoire de Benkei. Paris: P.O.F., 1995. 95 p.
  • Bokuteikishū 牧笛集

  • Poetry collection by Fujiwara no Kiyosuke (1104-1177).
  • Title tr. as “Shepherd’s Flute Collection” (Putzlar, Japanese Literature, 1973, 63).
  • Bonen no ki 暮年記

    Bungo fudoki 豊後風土記

  • see main Fudoki entry.
  • Bunka shūreishū 文華秀麗集

  • Second imperial kanshi collection, compiled by Fujiwara no Fuyutsugu 藤原冬嗣 (775-826).
  • Konishi, History, Vol. 2: 1:211; 3:295-6; 5:267.
  • Watson, Poems and Prose in Chinese, 1975, vol. 1, pp. 42-45 [Excerpt].
  • Bunkyū hifuron 文鏡秘府論

  • Bodman, Richard Wainwright. “A Study and Translation of Kukai’s ‘Bunkyo Hifuron.'” PhD dissertation, Cornell University, 1978.
  • Bunshō sōshi 文正さうし [文正草子]

  • Araki, James. “Bunshō Sōshi. The Tale of Bunshō, the Saltmaker,” MN 38: 3 (1983), 221-249.
  • Rumpf, Fritz. Japanische Volksmärchen. Jena, 1938. [n.s.]
  • e-text by H. Shinozaki
  • Bussokuseki no uta (bussokuseikika) 仏足石歌碑

  • Cranston, Edwin A. “The Buddha’s Footstone Poems” in Cranston, A Waka Anthology (1993), 767-775.
  • Mills, Douglas E. “The Buddha’s Footprint Stone Poems.” Journal of the American Oriental Society 80.3 (July-Sept. 1960), 229-242.
  • Miller, Roy Andrew. “The Footprints of the Buddha“: An Eighth-Century Old Japanese Poetic Sequence. New Haven: American Oriental Society, 1975. REV: Cranston, MN 31.3 (1976).
  • Philippi, D.L. “21 Songs on the Buddha’s Foot-prints.” Nihon Bunka Kenkyūjo Kiyō [Kokugakuin University ] no. 2, (1958).
  • see Princeton Companion [hereafter PCCJL] p. 271. 
  • byobu uta [byobu no uta] 屏風歌

  • genre of poems written to accompany screen paintings. PCCJL p. 31.
  • Discussion in Pigeot, Michiyuki-bun, 93-103 (“poemes pour paravents”).
  • A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – M – N – O – R – S – T – U – W – Y – Z [return to top]

    Chigo Kannon engi 稚児観音縁起

    • Early 14th-century tale. Nihon Emaki Taisei, vol. 24.
    • Tr. as “The Story of Kannon’s Manifestation as a Youth” by Margaret H. Childs in Stephen Miller, ed., Partings at Dawn, 1996, 31-35.

    Chikuenshō 竹園抄

  • “Edited selections from a bamboo grove, ca. 1265-70; attr. Tameaki” (Klein, Allegories of Desire, 2002, p. 327, quoted p. 174, 230-31).
  • Chikurinshō 竹林抄

  • “Bamboo Grove Notes” by Sōgi, 1476
  • Chiteiki 池亭記 (982)

  • by Yoshishige no Yasutane 慶滋保胤 (see PCCJL entry)
  • Watson, Burton. “Record of the Pond Pavilion,” in Japanese Literature in Chinese, vol. 1. New York: Columbia UP, 1975; pp. 57-64. Reprinted in Burton Watson, Four Huts: Asian Writing on the Simple Life (Boston: Shambala, 1994).
  • Mangold, Gunther. “Das Chiteiki.” N.O.A.G. 121-122 (1977), pp. 53-62. [German]
  • Dong, Donald D. “Yoshishige no Yasutane, Chiteiki. MN 26: 3/4 (1971), 445-53.
  • chōka 長歌

  • Genre of long poem with alternating lines of five and seven syllables. Typical of Man’yōshū, but found in later collections (e.g. Kokinshū, book 19).
  • Chūyūki 中右記

    • Kanbun diary by Fujiwara no Munetada 藤原宗忠 (1062-1141), covering years 1087-1138.
    • Excerpts translated in Keene, Seeds, 1993, 399-402.

    A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – M – N – O – R – S – T – U – W – Y – Z [return to top]

    Dainihonkoku hokekyō genki 大日本国法華経験記

  • Dykstra, Yoshiko K. Miraculous Tales of the Lotus Sutra from Ancient Japan. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1984. [Complete translation]
  • Dykstra, Yoshiko K. “Miraculous Tales of the Lotus Sutra: The Dainihonkoku Hokkegenki.”  MN 32: 2 (1977), 189-210.
  • Dōjōji engi emaki 道成寺縁起絵巻

    • An illustrated scroll of the Dōjōji legend, probably of the fifteenth century. A National Treasure, owned by Dōjōji, Tanabe-shi, Wakayama-ken.
    • Waters, Virginia Skord. “Sex, Lies, and the Illustrated Scroll: The Dōjōji Engi Emaki.” MN 52.1 (Spring, 1997), 59-84. [Translation from p. 75.]

    Dokugin Hyakuin 独吟百韻 (by Shinkei, 1467)

    • Linked verse sequence by Shinkei 心敬 (1406-1475).  Its full (and “proper”) title is: Ōnin gannen natsu Shinkei dokugin yamanani hyakuin 応仁元年夏心敬独吟山何百韻.
    • Cranston, Edwin A. “Shinkei’s 1467 Dokugin Hyakuin.” HJAS 54.2 (Dec., 1994), 461-507.

    A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – M – N – O – R – S – T – U – W – Y – Z [return to top]

    Eiga ittei 詠歌一体

  • “The Style of Composition,1274, by Fujiwara Tameie 藤原為家
  • “The foremost style of poetic composition” (Klein, Allegories, 2002).
  • Brower, Robert H. “The Foremost Style of Poetic Composition: Fujiwara Tameie’s Eiga no Ittei.” MN 42: 4 (1987), 391-430.
  • Eiga monogatari 栄花物語(栄華物語)

  • McCullough, Helen C., and William H. McCullough. Tale of Flowering Fortunes: Annals of Japanese Aristocratic Life in the Heian Period. 2 vols. Stanford, California: Stanford UP, 1980.
  • Hurst, G. Cameron, III. “Michinaga’s Maladies.” MN 34: 1 (1979), 101-112.
  • Eiga no taigai (eika no taigai) 詠歌大概

  • “Rules for Tanka composition” (or “Essentials of Poetic Composition”)  by Fujiwara no Teika 藤原定家 (1162-1241). Dated variously as c. 1216 or 1222.
  • Sato, Hiroaki. “An outline for composing tanka” in Sato and Watson, Eight Islands, 1981, pp. 202-218.
  • Title also tr. as “An outline for poetic composition” (Klein, Allegories, 2002).
  • Eigen jakushitsu oshō goroku 永源寂室和尚語録

  • Poetry in Chinese by Jakushitsu Genkō 寂室元光 (1290-1367).
  • Watson, Burton. Rainbow World. Seattle: Broken Moon Press, 1990. pp.121-29 [tr. of foreword and 10 poems]
  • Eihei kōroku 永平広録

    • Collection of the later teachings of Eihei Dōgen 永平道元 (1200-53), founder of the Japanese Sōtō 曹洞 school of Zen 禅.
    • Dōgen’s Extensive Record: A Translation of the Eihei Kōroku. Translated by Taigen Dan Leighton and Shōhaku Okumura. Edited and introduced by Taigen Dan Leighton. Boston: Wisdom Publication, 2004. 720 p. [Publisher’s info.]

    Eihei shingi 永平清規

    • By Eihei Dōgen 永平道元 (1200-53).
    • Eihei Rules of Purity.” Online translation in progress. Soto Zen Text Project.
    • Dōgen’s Pure Standards for the Zen Community: A Translation of ‘Eihei Shingi.’ Tr. by Taigen Daniel Leighton and Shohaku Okumura. State University of New York Press, 1996. 272 p. REV: T. Griffith Foulk, [Review], MN 5.4 (Winter, 1996), 507-10.

    Engi shiki 延喜式

  • Early tenth-century regulations, in fifty books. Attrib. to Fujiwara Tokihira 藤原時平 (871-909).
  • Bentley, Historiographical trends, 2002, pp. 207-209. [Two norito (“liturgies”) from Engi shiki.]
  • Bock, Felicia G. “The Enthronement Rites: The Text of Engishiki, 927.” MN 45: 3 (1990), 307-38. // Classical Learning and Taoist Practices in Early Japan, with a translation of Books XVI and XX of the Engi-Shiki. Occasional Paper No. 17, Center for Asian Studies, Arizona State Univ., 1985. //  Engi-shiki : procedures of the Engi Era. Monumenta Nipponica monograph. 2 vols. Tokyo: Sophia University, 1970-1972. [Books I-V, 1970, 185 p.; Books V-X, 1972, 190 p.] [reviews] // “Engi-shiki: ceremonial procedures of the Engi era, 901-922.” Ph.D. dissertation. Berkeley, University of California, 1966.
  • Ellwood, Robert S. The Feast of Kingship. Accession Ceremonies in Ancient Japan. Monumenta Nipponica monograph. Tokyo: Sophia University, 1970. REV. Bock, MN 28 (1973).
  • See Norito for Donald Philippi’s translation of Engi shiki, book 8.

  • Esopo no fabulas エソポノハブラス(イソポノハブラス)

    • Translation of Aesop’s life and fables printed on the Jesuit Mission Press in romanized Japanese in 1593.  Sometimes referred to as Amakusaban Isoppo monogatari 天草版伊曽保物語. However, Esopo no fabulas (Aesop’s fables) is the name on the title page, and is best used for the Jesuit printing to distinguish it from the longer and substantially different kokutai (Japanese character) version entitled Isoppo monogatari 伊曽保物語 that went through numerous editions in the 18th century.
    • Studies include: Michael Watson, “A Slave’s Wit: Early Japanese Translations of the Life of Aesop,” Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Japan (2007); Pack Carnes, “‘Esopos no fabulas’: More Notes on Aesop in Sixteenth-Century Japan,” Reinardus (2001), 99-113; Richard L. Spear, “Research on the 1593 Jesuit Mission Press Edition of Esop’s Fables.” MN 19: 3/4 (1964), 456-65.
    • e-text ed. A. Okajima (romaji, kana)

    A – B – C – D – EF – G – H – I – J – K – M – N – O – R – S – T – U – W – Y – Z [return to top]

    Fudoki 風土記

    • The term fudoki is translated variously as “topographies,” “geographical treatises,” or “gazetteers of the province.” Fudoki of the provinces were produced in the early 8th century on the orders of the central government. The following are extant: Bungo fudoki 豊後風土記, Harima fudoki 播磨風土記, Hitachi fudoki 常陸風土記, Hizen fudoki 肥前風土記, and Izumo fudoki 出雲風土記(all references gathered here]
    • Aoki, Michiko Yamaguchi. Records of Wind and Earth: A Translation of Fudoki, with Introduction and Commentaries. Ann Arbor: Association of Asian Studies Monograph Series, 1997. [OP / AAS]
    • Brannen, Noel S. Wind and pines: ancient Japanese poems from the Fudoki. Portland Ore., Image Gallery, 1977.
    • Story of Urashima tr. in Naumann, Zauberschale, 1973, 27f
    • Florenz, Karl. Japanische Mythologie. MOAG (1901): 282-308. [Trans. of short passages]
    • Harima fudoki 播磨風土記
    • Topography for Harima Province, ca. 714. 
    • Palmer, Edwina. “‘The “Womë-No’ Poem of ‘Harima Fudoki’ and Residual Orality in Ancient Japan.” Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, 63.1 (2000), 81-89. [Includes translation and discussion of poem on Ome-no 小目野. ]
    • Hitachi fudoki 常陸風土記
    • Funke, Mark C. “Hitachi no Kuni Fudoki.” MN 49.1 (Spring 1994), 1-29.
    • [Anon], Traditions, vol. 1 no. 2, 1977, pp. 23-48; vol. 1 no. 3, 1977, pp. 55-78. 
    • Sakai Atsuharu. “The Hitachi Fudoki or Records of customs and land of Hitachi.” Cultural Nippon IX, 2 (1941), pp. 141-195
    • One “blessing formula” of Hitachi Fudoki  trans. in Philippi 1990, p. 82. See Norito.

    Fubokushō / Fubokuwakashō 夫木和歌抄

  • Kamakura waka collection (1310?) compiled by Fujiwara Nagakiyo 藤原長清.
  • Fūgashū / Fūgawakashū 風雅和歌集 (1349)

  • 17th imperial anthology. (“FGS”). Titled translated variously as “Collection of Japanese Poetry of Elegance,” “Collection of Elegance” (Keene, Seed, 708), “Collection of elegant Japanese poetry, 1349” (Klein, Allegories, 2002).
  • 36 poems tr. in Brower and Miner, JCP, 1961.
  • Fukan zazengi 普観座禅儀 (1227)

  • “General Advice on the Principles of Zazen” by Dōgen 道元 (1200-1253).
  • Bielefeldt, Carl. Dōgen’s manuals of Zen meditation. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988, pp. 174-87.
  • Yokoi Yuho. Master Dōgen. An introduction with selected writings. New York,1976.
  • Dumoulin, Heinrich. “Allgemeine Lehren zur Förderung des Zazen von Zen-Meister Dōgen.” MN 14: 3/4 (1959), 429-36.
  • Masunaga Reiho. Introduction to HukanzazangiTokyo, 1956.
  • Fukuro zōshi 袋草紙

          Fukutomi sōshi 福富草紙

        • Muromachi-period tale.
        • Fukutomi chōja monogatari 福富長者物語

          • Muromachi-period tale. NKBT 38. 
          • Tr. as “The King of Farts” in Skord, Tales of Tears and Laughter, 1991.

          Fushimi in nakatsukasa naishi nikki 伏見院中務内侍日記

        • diary (1292)
        • e-text ed. M. Shibata under prep. (Yomeido bunko)
        • Fushimi-in Nijūban uta-awase 伏見院二十番歌合

          Fūyōshū / Fūyōwakashū 風葉和歌集

        • “The Collection of Wind-Blown Leaves” / “Wind and Leaves Collection.” Mid-Kamakura collection of poems from monogatari, a valuable source of information about tales that are not now extant. Compiled in 1271.
        • fuzoku uta (genre) 風俗(歌)

        • Heian court song to accompaniment of wagon (Japanese six-string koto) [PCCJL 274]
        • four songs tr. Hiroaki Sato in Sato and Watson 1981:155-6.

        • A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I -J – K – M – N – O – R – S – T – U – W – Y – Z [return to top]

          Genji monogatari 源氏物語

        • Fiala, Karel. Pribeh Prince Gendziho. Vol. 1. Prague: Nakl. Paseka, 2002. 380 pp. ISBN 8071854522 [Czech translation]. Vol. 2, 2005, ISBN 8071857092.  [Webcat]
        • Tyler, Royall. The Tale of Genji. New York: Viking Press, 2001. Paperback edition (Penguin Classics, 2002). Now available for Kindle.
        • McCullough, Helen Craig. Genji & Heike: Selections from The Tale of Genji and The Tale of the Heike. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1994.
        • Rickmeyer, Jens and Iris Hasselberg. Klassischjapanische Lektüre, Genji no Monogatari. Hamburg: Buske, 1991. [Detailed introduction to language of Genji through analysis of “Kiritsubo” maki.]
        • Sokolova-Deliusina, Tatiana. Povest o Gendzi: Gendzi-monogatari 6 vols. Moscow: Nauka, 1991-3. [webcat entry]
        • Seidensticker, Edward G. The Tale of Genji. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1976. // Excerpts from chapters 1, 2, 5, 7, 9, 10, 12, 13, 25, 35, 35, 36, 40, 41, 45, 46, 47, 51, 53 are reprinted in Shirane, TJL (2007), 293–448. //  E.G.Seidensticker, Chiefly on Translating the Genji.” JJS 6.1 (1980), 15-47.
        • Sieffert, René. Le Dit du Genji. 2 vols. Paris: P.O.F., 1978-85. Reissued P.O.F Tama 1993. [Boxed set.] REV: Marian Ury, “Tales of Genji.” HJAS 51.1 (1991), 263-308.
        • Benl, Oscar. Genji-Monogatari. 2 vols. Zürich: Manesse Verlag, 1966.
        • Haguenauer, C. Le Genji Monogatari. Paris, 1959. [“Kiritsubo” only]
        • Waley, Arthur. The Tale of Genji. A Novel in Six Parts by Lady Murasaki. 1925-1933. [Often reprinted. Link is for paperback edition published by Tuttle (2010) that is also available on Kindle. The Tuttle edition has an introduction by Dennis Washburn.]
        • Versions believed to derive all or in part from Waley’s translation:
        • Storia di Genji: il principe splendente: romanzo giapponese dell’xi secolo / Murasaki Shikibu; a cura di Adriana Motti dall’edizione di Arthur Waley. Torino: Einaudi, 1957. Republished in 1992. [Italian]
        • Die Geschichte vom Prinzen Genji. Nach der Englischen Uebertragung von Arthur Waley, Deutsch vom Herberth E. Herlitschka. 2 vols. Wiesbaden: Insel Verlag, 1937. Often reprinted. [German]
        • [Dutch translation: Amsterdam, Van holkema and Warendorf, 1930. Details?]
        • Alkman, Annastina. Genjis roman: en japansk Don Juan for 1000 ar sedan [av] Hovdamen Murasaki. Bokforlaget Natur och Kultur, 1928 [or 1927?]. [Swedish]
        • Le Roman de Genji / Mourasaki Shikibou ; traduit par Kikou Yamata d’apres la version anglaise de A. Waley, et le texte original ancien. Paris: Plon, 1928 [French]. [Date corrected, wrongly given in Webcat as c1922. Waley’s first volume did not appear until 1925.]
        • Suyematz, Kenchio [Suematsu Kenchō 末松謙澄]. Genji monogatari. London, 1882. [Rpt in Tuttle pbk.][Project Gutenberg includes an electronic text of an early reprint of Suematsu’s translation.]
        • Review articles: Midorikawa Machiko. “Coming to Terms with the Alien: Translations of Genji Monogatari.” MN 58: 2 (2003), 193-222; Marian Ury, “The Real Murasaki.” MN 38: 2 (1983), 175-90; Helen McCullough, MN 32: 1 (1977), 93-110,  Edwin Cranston, JJS 4.1 (1978); D. E. Mills, Modern Asian Studies 12.4 (1978); Masao Miyoshi, “Translation as Interpretation,” JAS 38.2 (1979); Marian Ury, “The Complete Genji,”  HJAS 37.1 (1977).  Marian Ury, “The Imaginary Kingdom and the Translator’s Art: Notes on Re-Reading Waley’s Genji.” JAS 2.2 (1976), 267-294.
        • E-text of Teika-bon ed. E. Shibuya. Modern translation and romanized text also offered. 
        • Other electronic texts available on CD-ROM or from Oxford Text Archive (Shogakukan ed.)
        • Fujitsu CD-ROM [link-1, link-2]. Review
        • Genji monogatari ekotoba 源氏物語絵詞

        • The work “consists of dry descriptions of over 280 scenes from the tale, each followed by a few lines from the text of the novel” (Maribeth Graybill, in review cited below, p. 155).
        • Murase, Miyeko. Iconography of the Tale of Genji: Genji monogatari ekotoba: New York and Tokyo: Weatherhill, 1974. [See review by Julia Meech-Pekarik, MN 39.4 (Winter, 1984), 476-480 and review by Maribeth Graybill, Journal of Asian Studies, 45.1 (Nov., 1985), 155-57.]
        • Morris, Ivan (trans.). The Tale of Genji Scroll. Tokyo: Kodansha, 1971.
        • e-text ed. M. Toshima (on Fukui site)
        • Genkō shakusho 元享釈書

        • 30 vol. denki completed ca. 1322, attrib. to monk Kokan Shiren 虎関師錬
        • Naumann, Wolfram, “Kein Vogel singt. Gedanken und Impressionen des Mönches Kokan Shiren (1278-1346) im Heiligtum von Ise” Bochumer Jahrbuch zur Ostasienforschung 12.2 (1989) [translation from book XVIII].
        • Ury, Marian Bloom. “Genkō shakusho, Japan’s first comprehensive history of Buddhism, a partial translation, with introduction and notes.” Ph.D. diss., Berkeley: University of California, 1970. 497 pp.
        • Genmu monogatari / Gemmu monogatari 幻夢物語

        • 15th century tale
        • “The Tale of Genmu” tr. by Margaret H. Childs, Rethinking Sorrow, 1991, reprinted in Steven Miller, ed. Partings at Dawn (1996), 36-54.
        • Genpei jōsuiki (Genpei seisuiki) 源平盛衰記 [Gempei jōsuiki. Gempei seisuiki]

        • “[A Record of] the Rise and Fall of the Minamoto and Taira.” Version of Heike monogatari in 48 books. The reading jōsuiki is now standard among medievalists in Japan.
        • Selinger, Vyjayanthi R. Authorizing the Shōgunate: Ritual and Material Symbolism in the Literary Construction of Warrior Order (Leiden: Brill, 2013). [Extensive discussion of text.]
        • Oyler, Elizabeth. Swords, Oaths, and Prophetic Visions: Authoring Warrior Rule in Medieval Japan. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 2006. [Discussion with tr. of short excerpts.]
        • Excerpts are also translated in a number of recent doctoral dissertations in English: Vyjayanthi Ratnam Selinger,  “Fractured Histories: Retrospections of the Past in the Gempei War Tales” (PhD dissertation, Cornell University, January 2007);  Michael Geoffrey Watson, “A Narrative Study of the Kakuichi-bon Heike monogatari” (DPhil thesis, Oxford University, 2003); David T. Bialock, David, “Peripheries of Power: Voice, History, and the Construction of Imperial and Sacred Space in ‘The Tale of the Heike’ and other Medieval and Historical Texts” (PhD dissertation, Columbia University, 1997).
        • Matisoff, Legend, 1978, pp. 173-4. [Passages concerning Semimaru]
        • Florenz, Karl. Geschichte der Japanischen Litteratur. Leipzig: Amelangs Verlag, 1906. [Episodes from battles of Ichi-no-tani and Dan-no-ura, pp. 304-308. Checked in 2nd ed., 1909.] [Reprint]
        • Short excerpts in Aston, History of Japanese Literature, 1899.
        • Title in other languages. German: “Die Geschichte der Blüte und des Verfalles der Gen und Hei” (Florenz, 1906);  French: “La Chronique de la grandeur et de la chute des Gen et des Hei” (Sieffert, Dit de Heiké, 1978, p. 23).
        • Minobe, Shigekatsu. “The world view of Genpei jōsuiki.” Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 9.2-3 (1982). [Trans. W. Michael Kelsey]  [PDF]
        • e-text ed. S. Kikuchi (www.j-text.com/sheet/seisuik.html) < Kokumin bunko, 1910.
        • e-text ed. Japan Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing (yoshi01.kokugo.edu.yamaguchi-u.ac.jp/kokugo/jal_ftp.html) < Yūhodo bunko, 1912
        • Gikeiki 義経記

        • Strugatskii, Aarkadii N. Skazanie o Esitsune: roman. Mostow, 1984. 285 p. Link; Reprint, St Petersburg, 2000. 300 p. Link. See Webcat links for cyrillic and other details.]
        • In his useful survey of 1987 (“Recent Soviet Studies in Pre-Modern Japanese Literature”), Alexander Kabanov gives the title as “Povest’ o Yoshitsune” (The Tale of Yoshitsune) but this appears to be incorrect. In a footnote, he reported that a Russian dissertation on Gikeiki was then nearing completion. ( MN 42: 3 (1987), 293and n19.)
        • McCullough, Helen C. Yoshitsune: A Fifteenth-Century Japanese Chronicle. University of Tokyo Press and Stanford UP, 1966. REV. Roland Schneider in NOAG 104 (1968). For links to reviews by Kenneth D. Butler, John S. Forster, W.G.Beaseley, Richard McKinnon see JSTOR.
        • e-text ed. H. Sato (www.st.rim.or.jp/~success/gikeiki_00.html) < Iwanami bunko, 1939, ed. H. Shimazu
        • Gōdanshō 江談抄

          • “Selection of Ōe’s Conversations.” Ōe no Masafusa 大江匡房 (1041-1111). A “series of short essays taken down from Masafusa’s conversations by Fujiwara no Sanekane [藤原実兼] (1085-1112)” [Keene, Seeds, 580.]
          • Ury, Marian. “The Ōe Conversations.” MN 48: 3 (1993), 359-80. [Selected tr. from p. 366.]

          Gosenshū / Gosen wakashū 後撰和歌集

        • 2nd imperial anthology, 950s
        • “Later selected collection of Japanese poetry” (Klein, Allegories, 2002).
        • Brower and Miner, JCP, 1961 [3 poems].
        • Konishi, History, Vol. 2: 1:15; 11:730.
        • Keene, Anthology, 1955, p. 92.
        • Revon, Anthologie, 1910, pp.113, 115-117.
        • GoShūishū / GoShūi wakashū 後拾遺和歌集

        • 4th imperial anthology, 1086. “GSIS”
        • “Later gleanings of Japanese poems” (Klein, Allegories, 2002).
        • Morrell, Robert E. “The Buddhist Poetry in the GoShūishū.” MN 28: 1 (1973), 87-100.
        • Brower and Miner, JCP, 1961 [6 poems].
        • Keene, Anthology,1955, pp. 94-95.
        • Revon, Anthologie, 1910, pp.113, 120-29.
        • Gotoba-in no gokuden 後鳥羽院御口伝

        • “Oral Instructions of the Cloistered Emperor Go-Toba.” Composed around 1225-27 by Retired Emperor Go-Toba 後鳥羽 (r. 1183-98).
        • Brower, Robert H. “Ex-Emperor Go-Toba’s Secret Teachings.” HJAS 32 (1972), 5-70.
        • Gozan bungaku (genre) 五山文学

        • Kabanov, Aleksandr M. Godzan bungaku: poeziia dzenskikh monastyrei. St Petersburg, 1999. 
        • Colas, Alain-Louis. Poemes du zen des cinq-montagnes. Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose, 1991.
        • Pollack, David. Zen Poems of the Five Mountains. New York: The Crossroad Publishing Company, 1985. 166 p.
        • poems by nine poets tr. Watson in Sato and Watson 1981:229-235.
        • Collcutt, Martin. “Gozan Literature: The Practice of Zen and the Pursuit of Poetry.” [Review article.] MN 33: 2 (1978), 201-06.
        • Ury, Marian. Poems of the Five Mountains: An Introduction to the Literature of the Zen Monasteries. Tokyo: Mushinsha, 1972. // Second, revised ed. published as Michigan monograph series in Japanese studies, no. 10, Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan, 1992. 
        • [background:] Collcutt, Martin. Five Mountains: The Rinzai Monastic Institution in Medieval Japan. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard UP, 1981. [Pbk. reprint, 1996]
        • Gukanshō 愚管抄

        • Historical study by Jien 慈円 (1155-1225). 
        • Brown, Delmer, and Ishida Ichiro. The future and the past: a translation and study of the Gukanshō, an interpretative history of Japan written in 1219. Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 1979. REV: Ury, JJS 6,2 (1980); Varley, MN 4: 4 (1979), 479-488 [Review article]
        • Robinson, G. W., and W. G. Beasley. “Japanische Geschichtsschreibung. Entstehung und Entwicklung einer eigenen Form vom 11. bis 14. Jh.” in: Saeculum VIII, 1-2 (1957).
        • Rahder, J. “Miscellany of Personal Views of an Ignorant Fool.” Acta Orientalia XV (1936), p. 173-230. + vol. XVI (1937), p. 59-77.
        • “Selections of the Opinions of a Fool” is another attempt to translate the title more literally.
        • Studies include: Hambrick, Charles H. “The Gukanshō: A religious view of Japanese history.” JJRS 5/1 (1978), 37–58. (online).
        • Gyokuyoshū / Gyokuyowakashū 玉葉和歌集

        • “Jeweled Leaves Collection.” 13th imperial anthology, compiled 1312-3.
        • Carter, Traditional Japanese Poetry, 1991. [14 poems]
        • Brower and Miner, JCP, 1961. [22 poems]
        • Gyōgi kihan 行儀規範

        • Sōtōshu (曹洞宗) ritual manual. Current translation project of Sōtō Zen Text Project
        • Gyokuden jinpi no maki 玉伝深秘巻

        • Waka commentary
        • “Jeweled transmission of deep secrets, 1273-78; attr. Tameaki” (Klein, Allegories, 2002, with quotations 154-55, 160, et passim).
        • A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I -J – K – M – N – O – R – S – T – U – W – Y – Z [return to top]

          Hachidaishū 八代集

        • First eight of the imperial poetry collections. The expression appears as early as Fujiwara no Teika’s diary Megetsuki (entry for 1234.9.8).
        • (1) Kokinshū (Kokinwakashū), (2) Gosenshū, (3) Shūishū, (4) Goshuishū, (5) Kin’yōshū, (6) Shikashū, (7) Senzaishū, (8) Shinkokinshū.
        • Note also the expression “Sandaishū” for first three collections and Nijuichidaishū for all twenty-one anthologies.
        • Hachikazuki 鉢かづき

        • Muromachi tale. NKBT 38.
        • Strippoli, Monoca tuttofare, 2001. [Italian tr.]
        • Steven, Chigusa. “Hachikazuki. A Muromachi Short Story. MN 32: 3 (1977), 303-331. (Title tr. as “”The Bowl Girl.”)
        • Hachiman gudōkun 八幡愚童訓 (13-14th c., shrine legends and historical source material)

          • Bockhold, Wolfgang. ” Das Hachiman-gudōkun (I) als historische Quelle, insbesondere zu den Invasionen der Mongolen in Japan. PhD dissertation. München: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, 1982. [Contains a study and translation into German of Hachiman gudōkun, part 1, which gives among others a detailed description of the Mongol invasions.]

          Hamamatsu chūnagon monogatari 浜松中納言物語

        • “The Hamamatsu Middle Counselor,” attrib. to Sugawara Takasue no Musume 菅原孝標女 (1008 – ?), author of Sarashina nikki and possibly also Yowa no nezame/Yoru no nezame. 
        • Rohlich, Thomas H. A Tale of Eleventh-Century Japan: Hamamatsu Chūnagon monogatari. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1983. [PhD thesis, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1979.] [Available from Books on Demand (UMI)]
        • Takeuchi, Charlotte Rohde og Lone. Evigt elskes kun det tabte : Hamamatsu chunangon monogatari, en japansk roman fra 1000-tallet. Copenhagen : Akademisk, 1981. 205 p. [Danish translation]
        • Harima fudoki 播磨風土記

        • See fudoki entry.
        • Hasedera Kannon Genki 長谷寺観音験記

        • Dykstra, Yoshiko Kurata. “Tales of the Compassionate Kannon: The Hasedera Kannon Genki.” MN 31: 2 (1976), 113-143. [tr. of 11 stories from collection of 52 tales: 1.4, 1.5, 1.15, 2.15, 2.16, 2.21, 2.27, 2.28, 2.31, 2.32, 2.33.]
        • Hatsuse 初瀬

        • Childs, Margaret H. “Didacticism in Medieval Short Stories. Hatsuse Monogatari and Akimichi. MN 42: 3 (1987), 253-88.
        • Heichū monogatari 平中物語

        • “Tales of Heichū.’ Mid tenth-century poem-tale in 39 episodes concerning Taira no Sadafun, nicknamed “Heichū.”
        • Videen, Susan Downing. Tales of Heichū. Harvard UP, 1989. *REV: Skord, MN 45 :3 (1990); Hulvey, JJS 50: 3 (1991).
        • Sieffert, René. Contes de Yamato suivis du dit de Heichû. Paris: P.O.F., 1979. 191 p. // Sieffert, René. Le Dit de Heichū. Paris: POF, 1979, reprinted in “Collection tama” 1994.
        • Heiji monogatari 平治物語

        • “Tale of Heiji” (“Tale of the Disturbance in Heiji”). Early thirteenth century battle tale (gunki monogatari) in three books, giving account of rebellion of 1159.
        • Tyler, Royall. Before Heike and After: Hōgen, Heiji, Jōkyūki. (2012). Also as Kindle edition.
        • Chalitpatanangune, Marisa. “‘Heiji Monogatari’: a Study and Annotated Translation of the Oldest Text.” Ph.D. Berkeley, 1987. [Based on Nakarai text]
        • Sieffert, René. Le dit de Hogen, le dit de Heiji. POF. Paris, 1976.
        • Stramigioli, Giuliana. “Heiji Monogatari, Parte I.” Rivista degli Studi Orientali 49, III-IV (1975); 5I, I-IV (1977). [Italian]
        • Reischauer, Edwin, “Heiji monogatari,” in Reischauer and Yamagiwa 1951. [Incomplete]
        • Heiji monogatari emaki 平治物語絵巻

        • Mason, Penelope E. A Reconstruction of the Hōgen-Heiji Monogatari Emaki. New York: Garland, 1977 [from New York University disseration, 1970]. [Excerpts]
        • Reischauer, Edwin, (Appendix) in Reischauer and Yamagiwa 1951. [Complete trans.]
        • Heike monogatari 平家物語

        • “The Tale of the Heike” (“The Tales of the Heike”). Early thirteenth-century military tale (gunki monogatari).
        • Tyler, Royall. The Tale of the Heike. New York: Viking, 2012. [Complete translation. 731 pp. The translation differs from all earlier translations into Western languages in striving to reflect the performance style of biwa hōshi reciters in distinguishing between three major formats: “speech,” “recitative”, and “song.”These are signalled by formatting and labelled as such on their first occurrence in each chapter  (see “Introduction,” p. xxix).  The translation includes a lengthy introduction, a list of principal figures in the tale (with chapter reference), genealogies and maps.] [A Kindle e-book is also available. Readers will find this useful for searching the text for proper names or other words, but should be warned that the formatting is poor in the electronic edition. Macrons are reproduced graphically.]
        • Watson, Burton. The Tales of the Heike. Edited by Haruo Shirane. New York: Columbia University Press, 2006. With Glossary of Characters (171-194) and Bibliography (195-208). Abridged translation (in following list of sections, asterisk indicates cuts within sections): 1.1* “The Bells of Gion Monastery”; 1.2* “Night Attack at Courtiers’ Hall”; 1.3* “Page-Boy Cuts”; 1.5 “Kiyomori’s Flowering Fortunes”; 1.6 “Giō”; 2.6* “The Admonition”; 2.7* “Signal Fires”; 2.10* “Death of the Major Counselor”; 2.15* “Yasuyori’s Prayer”; 3.1* “The Pardon”; 3.2* “The Foot-Drumming”; 3.8* “Ariō”; 3.9* “The Death of Shunkan”; 4.11* “Battle at the Bridge”; 5.7* “Mongaku’s Ascetic Practices”; 5.10* “The Retired Emperor’s Fukuhara Edict”; 5.14* “The Burning of Nara”; 5.14  “The Burning of Nara”; 6.7  “The Death of Kiyomori”; 7.8 “Sanemori”; 7.16 “Tadanori Departs from the Capital”; 7.20 “The Flight from Fukuhara”; 9.4 “The Death of Lord Kiso”; 9.12 “The Attack from the Cliff”; 9.14 “The Death of Tadanori”; 9.15 “The Capture of Shigehira”; 9.16 “The Death of Atsumori”; 10.5* “Regarding the Precepts”; 10.7* “Senju-no-Mae”; 10.8* “Yokobue”; 10.10* “Koremori Becomes a Monk”; 10.12* “Koremori Enters the Sea”; 11.3 “The Death of Tsuginobu”; 11.4 “Nasu no Yoichi”; 11.5 “The Lost Bow”; 11.7 “The Cockfights and the Battle of Dan-no-ura”; 11.8 “Far-flying Arrows”; 11.9 “The Drowning of the Former Emperor”; 12.9* “The Execution of Rokudai”; The Initiates’ Book 1 “The Imperial Lady Becomes a Nun”; 2 “The Move to Ōhara”; 3 “The Retired Emperor Visits Ōhara”; 4 “The Six Paths of Existence”; 5 “The Death of the Imperial Lady.”
        • Reese, Heinz-Dieter. “Fünf Erzählungen aus dem Heike-Epos in Kommentierten Übersetzung” in Franziska Ehmcke and Heinz-Dieter Reese, ed., Von Helden, Mönchen und schönen Frauen: Die Welt des japanischen Heike Epos. Cologne: Böhlau, 2000. Parallel text format of heikyoku versions of “Yokobue,” “Nasu no Yoichi,” “Atsumori,” Dan-no-ura,” “Yoshitsune” with German translation and notes.
        • [Czech trans.] Fiala, Karel. Pribeh rodu Taira. Prague: Mlada Fronta, 1993. 477 p.
        • McCullough, Helen Craig. Genji & Heike: Selections from The Tale of Genji and The Tale of the Heike. Stanford UP, 1994. [Revised, abridged.]
        • McCullough, Helen Craig. The Tale of the Heike. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1988.  [Reviews include: Borgen, . JAOS 111 (1991): 123-4; Kamens, JJS 16 (1990): 132-139; Hochstedler, MN 45 (1990): 95-98; Varley, JAS 48 (1989): 397-9; Seidensticker, TLS (April 7-13, 1989): 370.]
        • Povest’ o dome Taira, tr. into Russian by I. L’vova. Poetry tr. by Alexander Dolin. Moscow: Khdozhestvennaia Literatura,1982.
        • Hutt, Graham, ed. Japanese Book Illustration, vol. 4: Heike Monogatari. New York: Abaris Books, 1982. [illustrations of all the 1656 (Meireki 2) woodblock edition]
        • Sieffert, René. Le Dit des Heike. Paris: P.O.F., 1978.
        • Kitagawa, Hiroshi, and Bruce T. Tsuchida. The Tale of the Heike. 2 vols. Tokyo: Tokyo UP, 1975, 1977. [vol. 2].  REV: McCullough JJS 2 (1976): 460-470;  Naff, MN 31: 1 (1976), 87-95 (review article); H. Shinoda, JQ 22.4 (1975): 386-7; Ruch, Japan Interpreter xi.2 (1976): 229-236.
        • Goto, S. and M. Prunier. Episodes du Heike monogatari. Paris, 1930. [Selections] // Goto, S., and M. Prunier. “Episodes du Heike monogatari.” Journal Asiatique 213 (1928).
        • Sadler, A. L. The Ten Foot Square Hut and Tales of the Heike: Being two thirteenth-century Japanese classics, the “Hojoki” and selections from “The Heike Monogatari.” Sydney: Angus & Robertson, 1928. [Tuttle reprint, 1972. Revised and abridged edition of earlier tr.]
        • Gundert, Wilhelm. Die japanische Literatur. Wildpark-Potsdam, 1929. [Excerpts pp. 79-84.]
        • Sadler, A. L. “The Heike Monogatari.” TASJ 46.2 (1918): 1-278; 49.1 (1921): 1-354. [Complete translation of rufubon version.]
        • Florenz, Geschichte der Japanischen Litteratur, 1906. [Tr. title as “Die Geschichte der Hei.” Excerpt from 11:9 (death of Antoku), pp. 307-8, together with longer translations from Genpei jōsuiki account of the battle of Dannoura, 304-7. In Florenz’s view, the comparison shows that Genpei jōsuiki version is “more objective and epic” (mehr sachlich und epische), while Heike is “more lyrical and emotional” (303). Cited from second edition, 1909.]
        • Valenziani, Charles [Carlo]. La Mort d’Atu-mori: Épisode de la Bataille d’Iti-no-Tani dans le Drame et dans les Chroniques. Textes Japonais transcrits et traduit par Charles Valenziani (Genève: H. George, Libraire-Éditeur, 1893),  46 pp.
        • Turrettini, François. Heike monogatari: recits de l’histoire du Japon au XIIme siècle. Geneve: H. Georg, 1871. 23 p. [Title page and all three plates online at Nichibunken.]
        • Short excerpts translated in Aston’s History of Japanese Literature.
        • See entry on studies page.
        • Japanese Text Initiative electronic text (Yuhodo 1921 edition)
        • E-texts of the Kakuichi, Rufubon, and other variants (including Genpei jōsuiki) can be found at j-text.com (S. Kichuchi) and cometweb.ne.jp/ara (K. Arayama).
        • Hitachi fudoki 常陸風土記

        • Funke, Mark C. “Hitachi no Kuni Fudoki.” MN 49.1 (Spring 1994), 1-29.
        • [Anon], Traditions, vol. 1 no. 2, 1977, pp. 23-48; vol. 1 no. 3, 1977, pp. 55-78.
        • Sakai Atsuharu. “The Hitachi Fudoki or Records of customs and land of Hitachi.” Cultural Nippon IX, 2 (1941), pp. 141-195.
        • One “blessing formula” of Hitachi Fudoki  trans. in Philippi 1990, p. 82. See Norito.
        • Hitomotogiku 一本菊

        • Pigeot, J., and Kosugi, K. Le chrysanthème solitaire (Hitomotogiku). Paris: Bibliotheque Nationale, Departement des manuscrits, Division des manuscrits orientaux, 1984. [2002 edition]
        • Hizen fudoki 肥前風土記

        • See Fudoki entry.
        • Hōbutsushū 宝物集

        • tale collection attrib. Taira Yasuyori (平康頼) (see Heike monogatari 3.7)
        • “A Collection of Treasures” (subject of unpublished M.A. by Lorinda Kiyama)
        • Hōgen monogatari 保元物語

        • “Tale of the Disorder of Hōgen” (“Tale of the Disturbance in Hōgen”). Early thirteenth century battle tale (gunki monogatari) in three books, giving account of failed rebellion in 1156.
        • Tyler, Royall. Before Heike and After: Hōgen, Heiji, Jōkyūki. (2012). Also as Kindle edition.
        • Wilson, William R. Hogen Monogatari: Tale of the Disorder of Hōgen. Tokyo: Sophia UP, 1971. Link is to reprint in Cornell East Asia Series.
        • Sieffert, René. Le dit de Hōgen, le dit de Heiji. POF. Paris, 1976.
        • Stramigioli, Giuliana. “Hōgen Monogatari.” Rivista degli Studi Orientali XLI (1966): 207-271; LII (1967): 121-181, 407-453.
        • Kellogg, E. R. “Hōgen Monogatari.” TASJ, vol. XLV part 1, 1917. [Incomplete]
        • Hōjōki 方丈記

        • account by Kamo no Chōmei 鴨長明 (1155-1216)
        • McKinney, Meredith, trans. Kenkō and Chōmei: Essays in Idleness and Hōjōki. (Penguin, forthcoming). Paperback and Kindle editions.
        • Crespo, Jesus Carlos Alvarez. Un relato desde mi choza. Madrid: Hiperion, 1998
          129 p. [Bilingual edition of romanized Japanese and Spanish]
        • Hōjōki. Aantekeningen uit mijn kluizenaarshut – Kamo no Chōmei, trans. A. Beerens, E.G. de Poorter, et al., Leiden/Voorburg: Pauper Press/Museumdrukkerij Die Haghe, 1998. [Dutch]
        • Liscutin, Nicola. Aufzeichnungen aus meiner Hütte [Notes from my Hut]. Frankfurt/M.: Insel Verlag, 1997. [With extensive introduction.]
        • Moriguchi, Yasuhiko, and David Jenkins. Hojoki: Visions of a Torn World. Berkeley, CA: Stone Bridge Press, 1996. [Translated as prose poem.][Available on Kindle]
        • Sieffert, René. Les notes de l’ermitage ; suivi de Histoires de conversion / Kamo no Chōmei. Paris: Publications Orientalistes de France, 1995. [With Hosshinshū]
        • Watson, Burton, “Record of the ten-foot square hut,” in Four Huts: Asian writing of the simple Life (Boston: Shambhala, 1994), pp. 51-114.
        • Fraccaro. Francesca. Ricordi di un eremo. Venice: Marsilio editori, 1991.
        • McCullough, Classical Japanese Prose (1990), pp. 379-92.
        • Hojoki: Ten Foot Square House, put into Basic English by Muro Masaru. Tokyo: Hokuseido Press, 1990.
        • Russian trans.: Zapiski u izgolovia; Zapiski iz keli; Zapiski ot skuki: klassicheskaia iaponskaia proza XI-XIV vekov. Moscow: 1988. 477 p. Translation of (1) Makura no sōshi, (2) Hōjōki, (3) Tsurezuregusa. Webcat [5280003735].
        • Czech trans.: Zapisky z volnych chvil: starojaponske literarni zapisniky
          Praha : Odeon, 1984) with Tsurezuregusa and Makura no sōshi. 331 p.
        • Nakamura and Caccatty, “Ecrit de l’ermitage” in Mille Ans, 1982, pp. 133-44.
        • Complete German tr. by Naumann, Zauberschale, 1973, 253-266.
        • Grosbois, Charles, and Tomiko Yoshida. Les heures oisives par Urabe Kenko. Suivi de Notes de ma cabane de moine par Kamo no Chōmei, traduction du R.P.Sauveur Candau. Paris: Gallimard/Unesco, 1968. [Translations of Tsurezuregusa and Hōjōki.]
        • Keene in Keene, Anthology, 1955, pp. 197-212.
        • Nohara. K. Hoodjooki: priskribo de dekfutkvadrata kabano / Kamo no Tjoomei. Esperanto-Kenkjusa, 1936.
        • Chanoch, Alexander.”Aufzeichnungen in einer kleinen Hütte” [Notes written in a little hut] in: Ostasiatische Zeitschrift, Neue Folge Vol. 6, 1930.
        • Sadler, A. L. The Ten Foot Square Hut and Tales of the Heike: Being two thirteenth-century Japanese classics, the “Hōjōki” and selections from “The Heike Monogatari.” Sydney: Angus & Robertson Limited, 1928. Reprints: Tuttle 1972; Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1970.
        • Revon, Anthologie, 1910, pp. 245-266.
        • Minakata, Kumagusund F. Victor Dickins, “A Japanese Thoreau of the twelfth century,” Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland  (1905), 237-264. Reprinted in F. Victor Dickins,  Ho-jo-ki, Notes from a ten feet hut (London: Gowans and Grey, 1907), 38 p., and in Collected Works of Frederick Victor Dickins (Tokyo: Ganesha, 1991), vol. 3 of 7 [link].
        • Itchikawa Daiji. Eine kleine Huette (Hōjōki), Lebensanschauung von Kamo no Chōmei. Berlin: C. A. Schwetschke und Sohn, 1902. 41 p.
        • Dixon, J. M. “A Description of My Hut.” TASJ XX 2 (1893). [Incomplete]
        • Natsume Soseki’s complete translation [date?] with an introduction can be found in his Zenshū, vol. 12, pp. 343-66 (Iwanami Shoten, 1967). The link is to the Kindle book edition.
        • study: Marra, Aesthetics of Discontent. 1991, pp. 88ff.
        • e-text ed. M. Shibata (KNBT)
        • searchable e-text of the NKBT text of Hojoki (Japanese Text Initiative)
        • Hōkyōki 宝慶記

        • by Dōgen 道元 (1200-1253)
        • Kodera, Takashi James. Dōgen’s Formative Years in China. An Historical Study and Annoted Translation of the Hōkyō-ki. London and Henley: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1980.
        • Honchō monzui 本朝文粋

        • “Literary Essence of Our Court,” compiled in 1064 by Fujiwara Akihira. A collection of Chinese prose and poetry written by Heian writers. (Title from Smits, Pursuit of Loneliness, 1995: 78)
        • Naumann, Wolfram, “Tokyuu no fu (‘Reimprosa über T’u-ch’iu’); eine chinesische Dichtung des Prinzen Kaneakira (914-987)” Begegnungen der Kulturen in Ost und West, Seoul 1987.
        • Watson, Burton, Japanese Literature in Chinese, Vol. 1, pp. 53 -67.
        • The title has also been translated as “Literary Essence of Our Country” (Keene, Seeds in the Heart, 344).
        • Honchō shinsen den 本朝神仙伝

        • “Lives of Japanese Spirit Immortals.” Single vol. collection of setsuwa  in Chinese compiled ca.1098 by Ōe no Masafusa 大江匡房
        • Excerpts tr. in Keene, Seeds, 1993, 579-80.
        • Bohner, Hermann. “Honchō-shinsen-den.” MN 13 (1957), 129-52.
        • Hon’in no jijū shū 本院侍従集

          Hōnen shōnin eden 法然上人絵伝

        • picture scroll, ca. 1316
        • Coates, Harper Havelock, and Ryugaku Ishizuka. Hōnen the Buddhist saint, his life and teaching, compiled by imperial order. 2nd edition, Kyoto: The Society for the Publication of Sacred Books of the World, 1949.
        • Hosshinjū [Hosshinshū] 発心集

        • “A Collection of Religious Awakenings” (PCCJL p. 177), “A Collection to Promote Religious Awakening” (Keene, Seeds, 765). Tale collection (setsuwashū) compiled by Kamo no Chōmei between 1212-6.
        • Sieffert, René. Les notes de l’ermitage; suivi de Histoires de conversion / Kamo no Chōmei. Paris: Publications Orientalistes de France, 1995. [With Hōjōki.]
        • Ury, Marian. “Recluses and Eccentric Monks: Tales from the Hosshinshū.” MN 27: 2 (1972), 149-73. [12 tales translated] // “The Hosshinshu: a partial translation with notes.” M.A. thesis. University of California, Berkeley, 1965. 235 p.
        • Pandey, Rajyashree. “Suki and Religious Awakening: Kamo no Chōmei’s Hosshinshū.” MN 47: 3 (1992), 299-322.
        • Seminar für Japanologie (Muenchen), “Uebersetzungen aus dem Hoshinshuu” NOAG 119 (1976) [translation of 14 stories].
        • Hosshin wakashū 発心和歌集

        • Poetry collection by Daisaiin Senchi (Senchi naishinnō) (964-1035).
        • Kamens, Edward. The Buddhist Poetry of the Great Kamo Priestess: Daisaniin Senshi and Hosshin wakashū. Ann Arbor: Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan, 1990. // REV Borgen, JJS 18.1 (1992); Morrell, HJAS 52.2 (1992).
        • Hyakunin isshu 百人一首

        • Mostow, Joshua. Pictures of the Heart: The Hyakunin Isshu in Word and Image. Honolulu: Hawaii UP, 1996.
        • Sieffert, René. De cent poetes un poème. Paris: P.O.F., 1993. p. 94 .
        • Rickmeyer, Jens. Einführung in das Klassische Japanisch. Anhand der Gedichtanthologie Hyakunin isshu. Hamburg: Buske, 1991. [German]
        • Berndt, Jurgen. Als war’s des Mondes letztes Licht am fruhen Morgen: Hundert Gedichte von hundert Dichtern aus Japan. Frankfurt am Main: Insel, 1987. [German]
        • Frey, Claudine. Les cent poèmes du Japon, traduit du japonais en francais par Claudine Frey ; traudit du francais en arabe par Mohsen Ben Hamida. Carthage : Fondation nationale pour la traduction, l’etablissement des textes et les etudes, Beit al-Hikma, 1987.
        • Levy, Howard S. Japan’s best loved poetry classic, Hyakunin isshu. Yokohama: Warm-Soft Village Publications, 1984.
        • Galt, Tom. The Little Treasury of One Hundred People, One Poem Each Compiled by Fuiwara no Sadaie (1162-1241). Princeton: Princeton UP, 1982.
        • Miyata, Haruo. The Ogura Anthology of Japanese Waka: A Hundred Pieces from A Hundred Poets. Osaka: Osaka Kyoiku Tosho, 1981.
        • Nambara, Yoshiko. Die hundert Gedichte : hyakunin isshu: eine Sammlung japanischer Gedichte, zusammengestellt um 1235 von Fujiwara no Sada-ie. Frankenau: Siebenberg-Verlag, 1963. [German. 2nd edition?]
        • Honda, H. H. One Hundred Poems from One Hundred Poets. Tokyo: The Hokuseido Press, 1957.
        • Muccioli, Marcello. La centuria poetica: Hyaku-nin is-shu / Fujiwara Teika ; traduzione dal giapponese, introduzione e commento di Marcello Muccioli. Firenze: Sansoni, 1950. [Italian trans.]
        • Porter, William N. A hundred verses from old Japan : being a translation of the Hyaku-nin-isshiu. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1909. [Reprint: Tokyo: C.E. Tuttle, 1979.]
        • Dickens, Frederick Victor. Hyak nin is’shiu, or, Stanzas by a century of poets, being Japanese lyrical odes, translated into English, with explanatory notes, the text in Japanese and Roman characters, and a full index, by F.V. Dickins. London: Smith, Elder, 1866. [Reprinted in Complete Works of Frederick Victor Dickens (Tokyo, Ganesha, 1999), vol. 2 of 7.]
        • A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I -J – K – M – N – O – R – S – T – U – W – Y – Z [return to top]

          Ichigon hōdan 一言芳談

        • “Brief Sayings of the Great Teachers.”
        • Hirota, Dennis. Plain words on the pure land way: sayings of the wandering monks of medieval Japan, a translation of Ichigon Hōdan. Kyoto: Ryūkoku University, 1989. 120 p. (Includes Japanese texts.)
        • e-text (Hozokan ed., 1938) at Kotenmura
        • Ichijō Sesshō gyoshū 一条摂政御集

          Ikkyū Sōjun: prose works

          • Ikkyū Sōjun 一休宗純 (1394-1481). 
          • Sanford, James H. “Mandalas of the Heart: Two Prose Works by Ikkyū Sōjun.” MN 35: 3 (1980), 273-98. [After an account of Ikkyū’s life, Sanford includes translations of two the seven prose works thought to be written by Ikkyū: Amida hadaka あまだはだか(or Amida hadaka monogatari 阿弥陀裸物語)(“Amida Stripped Bare”), pp. 283-89, and Bukkigun 仏鬼軍 (“the Buddhas’ Great War on Hell”), pp. 290-98 (with illustrations). Both belong to genre of  kana hōgo 仮名法語, a form of popular sermon.
          • Ikkyū gaikotsu 一休骸骨) tr. as “Ikkyū’s Skeletons” in R. H. Blyth, The Eastern Buddhist, VI:1 (1973), 111-25.
          • For Ikkyū’s poetic works, see Kyōunshū.

          Ima kagami 今鏡

        • “The New Mirror.” Rekishi monogatari covering years 1025-70.
        • e-text ed. M. Shibata under prep. (KNBT)
        • Ima monogatari 今物語

        • by Fujiwara Nobuzane 藤原信実
        • Guelberg, Niels. Kleine literarische Denkmäler des japanischen Mittelalters I: Das Ima monogatari. 1989 [unpublished German translation; Internet-edition forthcoming]
        • e-text ed. M. Shibata under prep. (GSRJ)
        • Ionushi いほぬし

        • e-text ed. A. Okajima
        • Ippen shōnin goroku 一遍上人語録

        • Ippen shōnin (1239-1289)
        • Hirota, Dennis. No abode: the record of Ippen. Kyoto: Ryūkoku University, 1986 // No abode: the record of Ippen. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1997.
        • Ise daijingū sankeiki 伊勢大神宮参詣記

          • “Account of a Pilgrimage to the Great Shrine at Ise.” Record of visit by Saka Jūbutsu in 1342.
          • Keene, Seeds, 1993, 971-73. [Excerpt tr.]
          • Sadler, A.L. Saka’s Diary of a Pilgrimage to Ise. Tokyo: The Meiji Japan Society, 1940.

          Ise monogatari 伊勢物語

        • Klein, Allegories, 2002. [Excerpts quoted in study of esoteric commentaries.]
        • McCullough, Helen C. Ise monogatari. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1968. [Excerpts also in Classical Japanese Prose (1990).]
        • Selections in German in Naumann, Zauberschale, 1973,73-84.
        • Harris, H. Jay. The Tales of Ise. Tokyo: Tuttle, 1972. REV Seidensticker, MN 27 (1972).
        • Renondeau, G. Contes d’Ise: Ise monogatari. Paris: Gallimard/Unesco, 1969 [1988]. 181 p
        • Vos, Frits. A Study of the Ise-monogatari with the text according to the Den-Teika-hippon and an annotated translation. 2 vols. ‘S-Gravenhage: Mouton & Co., 1957.
        • Benl, Oscar. Liebesgeschichten des japanischen kavaliers Narihira: Aus dem Ise-monogatari, 1957. [Excerpts in Benl, Der Kirschblutenzweig: Japanische Liebesgeschichten aus tausend Jahren. Munchen: Nymphenburger Verlagshandlung, 1985.]
        • Studies include: Richard Bowring, “The Ise monogatari: A Short Cultural History,” HJAS 52.2 (1992), 401-480. See also entry on studies page
        • e-text at JTI; e-text ed. E. Shibuya
        • e-text (Iwanami bunko, 1964) at Kotenmura
        • Ise monogatari shō 伊勢物語抄 (Reizeike-ryu 冷泉家 Ise monogatari sho)

        • “Selected comments on Ise monogatari of the Reizei family lineage” (Klein, Allegories, 2002, with excerpts quoted in translation, pp. 28-29, et passim).
        • Ise monogatari zuinō 伊勢物語髄脳

        • “The essence of Ise monogatari; attr. Nijō Tameakira” (Klein, Allegories, 2002, with excerpts quoted in translation, pp. 37. 154-55, et passim).
        • Klein, Susan Blakeley. “Ise Monogatari Zuinō: An Annotated Translation.” MN 53: 1 (1998), 13-44. // Allegories of Desire: Poetry and Eroticism in Ise Monogatari Zuino. MN 52: 4 (1997), 441-466. 
        • Ise shū 伊勢集

          • French translation by Renée Garde completed but not yet published.
          • Selections trans. as “The Diary of Lady Ise” in Mostow, At the House of Gathered Leaves, 2004.

          Issun bōshi 一寸法師

        • Sieffert, René. Le Livre des contes. Paris: P.O.F., 1993. p. 13-18.
        • e-text (1925) by H. Shinozaki
        • Iwade shinobu monogatari [ ]

          • “A Tale of Unspoken Yearning.” Kamakura-period courtly tale.
          • Keene, Seeds, 1993, 810-14. [Summary, discussion.]

          Izayoi nikki 十六夜日記

        • “The Diary of the Waning Moon.” Travel diary by Abutsu 阿仏 (? – 1283)
        • McCullough, Classical Japanese Prose, 1990.
        • Yamagiwa and Reischauer, Translations, 1951.
        • e-text ed. M. Shibata; e-text ed. H. Shinozaki (both from GSRJ)
        • Izumi shikibu 和泉式部 (otogizōshi)

        • Kubota, Yoko. “L’Izumi Shikibu: storia della passione tra un monaco e una yūjo. Il Giappone 30 (1991): 5-49.
        • Izumi shikibu nikki 和泉式部日記

        • Smits, Ivo. Izumi Shikibu, Jouw koude hart zwijgt. Memoires. Amsterdam: Contact, 1995.
        • Sieffert, René. Izumi-shikibu : Journal et poèmes. Paris: P.O.F., 1989. 202 p.
        • Cranston, Edwin A. The Izumi Shikibu Diary. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1969. O.P.
        • Selections trans. in Benl, Der Kirschblutenzweig (1985).
        • Miner, Earl. Japanese Poetic Diaries. Berkeley, 1969.
        • Omori and Doi, Diaries of Court Ladies of Old Japan, 1920.
        • Wallace, John R. “Reading the Rhetoric of Seduction in Izumi Shikibu nikki.” HJAS 58.2 (Dec. 1998), 481-512.
        • Walker, Janet A. “Poetic Ideal and Fictional Reality in the Izumi Shikibu Nikki.” HJAS 37 (1977).
        • e-text ed. M. Shibata under prep. (KNBT)
        • e-text (SNKBS, 1996) at Kotenmura
        • Izumi shikibu shu 和泉式部集

        • Hirshfield, Jane. The Ink Dark Moon. Love Poems by Ono no Komachi and Izumi Shikibu, Women of the Ancient Court of Japan. New York: Vintage Books, 1990. [Selections]
        • Sieffert, René. Izumi-shikibu: Journal et poèmes. Paris: P.O.F., 1989. 202 p.
        • Yosano, Fumi. Izumi-Shikibu. Poèmes de Cour. Paris: Orphee/La Difference, 1991.
        • Cranston, Edwin A. “The Poetry of Izumi Shikibu.” MN 25 (1971): 1-11.
        • e-text (SNKBS, 1996) at Kotenmura
        • Izumigajō 和泉が城 (kowaka genre)

        • tr. as Izumi’s Fortress in James T. Araki, The Ballad-Drama of Medieval Japan,1964, pp. 172-195.
        • Izumo fudoki 出雲風土記

          A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – M – N – O – R – S – T – U – W – Y – Z [return to top]

          Jigokuzōshi 地獄草紙

          • “Hell Scrolls”; “Scroll of the Hells.”
          • Gutierrez, Fernando G. “Emakimono Depicting the Pains of the Damned.” MN 22: 3/4 (1967), 278-89. [Includes translations of explanatory texts in following emakimono: (1) Jigokuzōshi (Anjūin 安住院, Tokyo National Museum), pp. 284-85; (2) Jigokuzōshi (Genkahon 原家本, Nara National Museum), pp. 285-86; and (3) Gakizōshi 餓鬼草紙 (Kyoto National Museum), p. 288.]
          • For images on museum pages, see (1) (2) (3) (“Scroll of the Hungry Ghosts”). (Like all external links, these are subject to change).

          Jikkinshō 十訓抄

        • Setsuwa collection compiled in 1252. Some 280 tales in 10 books. Title has been trans. as “Stories Selected to Illustrate the Ten Maxims” (Geddes 1982). Titles of ten books trans. in Geddes 1987: 157 as well as Brownlee 1974 (see below).
        • Geddes, Ward. “The Courtly Model: Chōmei and Kiyomori in Jikkinshō.” MN 42: 2 (1987), 157-166. [Trans. of 9:7 (“Kamo no Chōmei’s Renunciation of the World”); 7:27 (“Kiyomori’s Compassion”)] // Geddes, Ward. “The Buddhist Monk in the Jikkinshō.” JJRS 9/2-3 (June-Sept, 1982), 199-212.  [online] // “A Partial translation and study of the Jikkinshō.” Ph.D. dissertation, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, 1976.
        • Brownlee, John S. “Jikkinshō, a Miscellany of Ten Maxims.” MN 29: 2 (Summer, 1974), 121-161. [Translation pp. 133-161: Preface, book 1 Intro. (“Some Rules for a Chaste Mind and Virtuous Conduct”), tale 1:1, 1:28, 1:51, book 2 Intro. (“Being Without Pride”), 2:1, book 3 Intro. (“On Not Despising Humanity”), 3:1, 3:12,  3:13, 3:15, book 4 Intro. (On Talking About People: A Caution”), book 5 Intro. (“Choosing Friends”), 5:8, book 6 Intro. (“On Loyalty and Devotion), 6:10, 6:2, 6:19, 6:35, book 7 Intro. (“On the Primacy of Discretion”), 7:12, 7:22, 7:30, book 8 Intro. (“Enduring Things”), 8:4, book 9 Intro. (“Giving Up Desirable Things”), 9:3, 9.4, book 10 Intro. (“On the Necessity of Artistic Talent and Accomplishment”), 10.27, 10.75, 10.76, Postscript. ].
        • Jinnō shōtōki 神皇正統記

        • Historical work by Kitabatake Chikafusa 北畠親房 (1293-1354).
        • Varley, H. Paul. A Chronicle of Gods and Sovereigns: Jinnō Shōtōki of Kitabatake Chikafusa. New York and London: Columbia UP, 1980.
        • Bohner, Hermann. Jinnō-Shōtō-ki, Buch von der Wahren Gott-Kaiser-Herrschafts-Linie. 2 vol.. MOAG, Tokyo, 1935.
        • Jizō bosatsu reigenki 地蔵菩薩験記

        • By Jitsuei of Miidera.
        • Dykstra, Yoshiko Kurata. “Jizō, the Most Merciful: Tales from Jizō Bosatsu Reigenki.” MN 33: 2 (1978), 179-200. [tales 1.1, 1.5, 1.7, 2.9, 2.10, 2.12, 3.5.]
        • Jōgū shōtoku hōō teisetsu 上宮聖徳法王帝説

        • [Anonymous bibiography of Shōtoku Taishi.]
        • Bentley, Historiographical trends, 2002, pp. 103-131.
        • Deal, William E. “Hagiography and History: The Image of Prince Shōtoku,” in George J. Tanabe, Jr., ed., Religions of Japan in Practice. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999. [Abridged translation.]
        • Bohner, Hermann. “I. Jōgū-Shōtoku Hōō-tei-setsu. II. Jōgū-Kwōaishi-Bosatsu-den.” MOAG, suppl. 15, Tokyo, 1940. 1033 p. [Includes translations and commentaries related to Shōtoku Taishi from a very large number of texts, including temple-scrolls and inscriptions on statues.]
        • [e-text / info] on Nihon kodai rekishi site.
        • Jōjin azari no haha no shū / Jōjin ajari no haha no shū 成尋阿闍梨母集 Jojin

        • “The Poems of the Mother of the Ajari Jōjin” (title from Keene, Seeds, 390). Jōjin (1011-81).
        • Mintzer, Rober Alfred. “Jōjin Azari no haha shū; maternal love in the eleventh century.” Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard, 1978.
        • study: Borgen, Robert. Jōjin Azari no Haha no Shū, A Poetic Reading,”in Hare et al, The Distant Isle, 1996, pp. 1-34.
        • Jōkyūki 承久記 see Shōkyūki

          Jōruri junidan zōshi 浄瑠璃十二段草子

        • Sieffert, René. Histoire de demoiselle Jōruri. Paris: P.O.F, 1994. 94 p.
        • Orsi, Maria Teresa, “Il Jōruri jū-ni-dan-zōshi.” Il Giappone 9 (1971): 99-156.
        • Jubokushō 入木抄

          • Treatise of calligraphy “written in 1352 by Prince Son’en 尊円, 1298-1356, for Emperor Go-Kōgon [後光厳], r. 1352-1371, of the Northern Court” (DeCoker 1988: 197).
          • DeCoker, Gary. “Secret Teachings in Medieval Calligraphy: Jubokushō and Saiyōshō.” MN 43.3 (Summer, 1988), 197-228. [Translation of Jubokushō, pp. 210-228].  [Continuation:] MN 43.3. (Autumn, 1988), 259-278. [Translation of Saiyōshō.]
          • See entries for Saiyōshō and Yakaku Teikinshō.

          Junrei gyōki 巡礼行記

        • Diary by Heian monk Ennin 円仁 (794-864).
        • Levy, Roger. Journal d’un voyageur en Chine au IXe siècle Paris: Albin Michel, 1961. 317 p.
        • Reischauer, Edwin O. Ennin’s diary : the record of a pilgrimage to China in search of the law. New York: Ronald Press, 1955. 454 p. REV. Dumoulin, MN 13 (1957)
        • A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – M – N – O – R – S – T – U – W – Y – Z [return to top]

          Kaden 家伝 see Tōji kaden 藤氏家伝

          Kagerō nikki 蜻蛉日記 Kagero

        • Diary by “Michitsuna no haha” 道綱母 (936?-995?)
        • Pigeot, Jacqueline. Mémoires d’une éphémère (954-974), par la mère de Fujiwara no Michitsuna. Bibliothèque de l’Institut des Hautes Etudes Japonaises. Paris: Collège de France, 2006. 342 p.
        • Arntzen, Sonja. The Kagero Diary . Michigan Monographs in Japanese Studies, Number 19. Ann Arbor: Center for Japanese Studies, The University of Michigan, 1997.
        • Goregliad, Vladislav Nikanorovich. Dnevnik efemernoi zhizni (Kagero nikki) – Mititsuna-no khakha. St Petersburg, 1994. 346 p. [Russian]
        • McCullough, Classical Japanese Prose (1990), 102-155 [book one].
        • Seidensticker, Edward G. The Gossamer Years: The Diary of a Noblewoman of Heian Japan. Tokyo, Japan and Rutland, Vermont: Tuttle, 1974. Revised trans. of: The Kagerō Nikki: Journal of a 10th Century Noblewoman (Tokyo: Asiatic Society of Japan, 1955). REV: Keene MN 12 (1956/57).
        • Tsukakoshi, Satoshi, Tadayoshi Imaizumi, and Max Niehans. Kagerō Nikki: Tagebuch einer japanischen Edelfrau ums Jahr 980. Zurich: Max Niehans, 1955. 301 p. [pbk reprint Frankfurt: Ullstein Taschenbuch, 1981][Erstmals aus dem Altjapanischen übertragen von Satoshi Tsukakoshi, unter Mitarbeit von Tadayoshi Imaizumi.Deutsche Fassung der Gedichte von Max Niehans.]
        • study: Watanabe, Minoru. “Style and Point of View in the Kagerō nikki.” Trans. Richard Bowring. JJS 10.2 (Summer1984): 365-384.
        • e-text (JTI) based on Iwanami Shoten, 1927 text.
        • kagura 神楽 genre

        • seven songs tr. by Hiroaki Sato in Sato and Watson 1981:149-51.
        • Muller, G. Kagura, Die Lieder der Kagura-Zeremonie am Naishidokoro. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 1971.
        • Kaidōki 海道記

        • Konishi, Hiroko. “The Kaidoki a partial translation with notes,” M.A. thesis, Berkeley, 1971.
        • Mittenzwei, Peter. Das Kaidōki: ein Reisetagebuch aus der Kamakura-Zeit. Frankfurt am Main: Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität zu Frankfurt am Main, 1977. [PhD]
        • e-text ed. M. Shibata under prep. (GSRJ)
        • Kaifūsō 懐風藻

        • Maurizi, Andrea. Il piu’ antico testo poetico del Giappone: il Kaifūsō (Raccolta in onore di antichi poeti). Supplemento n. 2 alla «Rivista degli Studi Orientali» volume LXXV Pisa-Roma: Istituti Editoriali e Poligrafici Internazionali, 2002. 115 p.
        • Langemann, Christoph, “Gedichte aus dem Kaifuusoo.” Hefte für Ostasiatische Literatur 11 (1991). [Excerpts]
        • Watson, Burton. Japanese Literature in Chinese: Poetry & Prose in Chinese by Japanese Writers of the Early/Late Period (1975), 1:17-26. [Excerpts]
        • Tsunoda, de Bary, and Keene, eds. Sources of the Japanese Tradition (1958), 1:88-90. [Complete trans. of preface]
        • Watson, Burton, in Keene, Anthology of Japanese Literature … to the Nineteenth Century (1955), 59-60. [Excerpts. The title is translated as “Fond Recollections of Poetry.”]
        • Kairaishiki 傀儡子記

        • by Ōe no Masafusa 大江匡房 (1041-1111).
        • Excerpts trans. into German by Michael Stein, Japans Kurtisanen (1997).
        • Janet R. Goodwin. “Shadows of Transgression: Heian and Kamakura Constructions of Prostitution.” MN 55.3 (2000), 327-368.
        • Kakyō hyōshiki 歌経標式

        • Fujiwara Hamanari 藤原 浜成 (724-790). See PCCJL p.150.
        • Rabinovitch, Judith. “Wasp waists and monkey tails: a study and translation of Hamanari’s 
        • no shiki (The Code of Poetry, 772), also known as Kakyō Hyōshiki (A Formulary for Verse Based on the Canons of Poetry).” HJAS 51.2 (Dec 1991), 471-560.
        • Kamatari-den 鎌足伝

          • Biography of Fujiwara no Kamatari 藤原鎌足 (614-669), member of Nakatomi 中臣 family, founder of the Fujiwara. Also known as Taishokukan 大織冠, a title he received from Emperor Tenchi in 669. 
          • Bohner, Hermann. “Kamatari-den 鎌足伝.  Taishokukwan-den. Kaden 家伝, d.i. Haustraditionen (des Hauses Fujiwara). Oberer (Band).” MN 4: 1 (January 1941), 207-245. [Trans. from p. 225.]

          Kanginshū 閑吟集

        • “Songs for Leisure Hours,” mid-Muromachi collection of kayō 歌謡 songs, possibly compiled by poet Sōchō 宗長 (1448-1532).
        • 10 kouta tr. Watson in Sato and Watson 1981: 262-263
        • Kanke bunsō 菅家文草

        • Poetry collection of Sugawara no Michizane 菅原道真 (845-903).
        • selections tr. in Borgen,  Sugawara no Michizane and the Early Heian Court (1994)
        • Kankyo no tomo 閑居友

          • “Companion of a Quiet Life.” Collection of 32 tales by Tendai priest Keisei 慶政 (1189-1269).
          • Pandey, Rajyashree. “Women, Sexuality, and Enlightenment: Kankyo no Tomo.” MN 50: 3 (1995), 325-54. [Includes trans. of sections 2:1-2:11, pp. 335-54.]

          kanshi (genre) 漢詩

          • Translations include the following:
          • Rabinovitch, Judith N., and Timothy R. Bradstock. Dance of the Butterflies Chinese Poetry from the Japanese Court Tradition. Ithaca: Cornell East Asia Series, 2005. 304 pp. [Link to CEAS] [Translations from fourteen anthologies: Kaifūsō (Poetic Gems Cherishing the Styles of Old) compiled 751, Ryōun Shinshū, Bunka Shūreishū, Keikokushū, Henjō Hakki Seireishū, Denshi Kashū, Kanke Bunsō, Kanke Kōshū, Fusōshū, Honchō Reisō, Honchō Monzui, Honchō Zoku Monzui, Hosshōji dono Gyoshū, Honchō Mudaishi. ADD: kanji and dates of compilation. English titles and dates of composition for “List of Poems by Title,” pp. xi-xxiv.]
          • Rouzer, Paul.
 “Early Buddhist Kanshi: Court, Country, and Kūkai.
” MN 59: 4 (2004), 431-61.
          • Smits, Ivo. The Pursuit of Loneliness: Chinese and Japanese nature poetry in medieval Japan, ca. 1050-1150. Münchener ostasiatische Studien, Band 73. München: F. Steiner, 1995. 235 p.
          • Watson, Japanese Literature in Chinese. Vol. 1, Poetry & prose in Chinese by Japanese writers of the early period. New York: Columbia University Press, 1975.
          • Kanke bunsō 菅家文草, selections tr. in Borgen,  Sugawara no Michizane and the Early Heian Court (1994).
          • “Poetry in Chinese” (Empress Shōtoku, Isonokami no Yakatsugu, Nakao-o, Princess Uchiko, Shimada no Tadaomi, Sugawara no Michizane, Fujiwara no Tadamichi), “Poems in Chinese by Buddhist Monks” (Sesson Yūbai, Kokan, Daichi, Mugan, Zekkai) trans. by Burton Watson in Keene, Anthology, 1955, 162-166, 312-313
          • See also entries for: Bunka shūreishū 文華秀麗集,  Gozan bungaku 五山文学, Wakan rōei shū  和漢朗詠集.

          Kara monogatari 唐物語

        • “Tales of China.” Early twelfth-century collection of twenty-seven tales.
        • Geddes, Ward. Kara monogatari: Tales of China. Arizona State University, 1984.
        • Karaito zōshi 唐絲草紙(唐糸草子)

        • Otogi-zōshi. (Karaito is the name of the heroine, who attempts to assassinate Yoritomo.)
        • tr. in René Sieffert, Le Livre des contes. Paris: P.O.F., 1993. p. 61-89.
        • Kenreimon’in ukyō no daibu shū 建礼門院右京大夫集

        • Harries, Phillip Tudor. The Poetic Memoirs of Lady Daibu. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1980.
        • Wagner, James G., tr. Kenreimon’in Ukyō no Daibu Shū. Introduction and Partial Translation.” MN 31: 1 (1968), 1-27.
        • e-text (SNKS, 1996) at Kotenmura
        • Kindai shūka 近代秀歌

        • “Superior Poems of Our Time.” Poetry collection compiled by Fujiwara no Teika 藤原定家 (1162-1241).
          Brower, Robert H., and Earl Miner. Fujiwara Teika’s Superior Poems of Our Time. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1967.
        • e-text ed. E. Shibuya
        • Kingyoku uta-awase 金玉歌合

          • “Poetry Contest of Gold and Jade.” Contest took place around 1304 and involved just two participants: Kyōgoku Tamekane 京極為兼 (1254-1332) and Retired Emperor Fushimi 伏見院 (1265-1317).
          • Huey, Robert N. “The Kingyoku Poetry Contest.” MN 42: 3 (1987), 299-330. [Tr. from 309.]

          Kinkafu 琴歌譜

        • Early Heian poetry collection.
        • Elliot, W., and N. S. Branner. Festive wine, Ancient Japanese Poems from the Kinkafu. New York: Weatherhill, 1969. REV: Earl Miner, JAOS 91.4 (1971).
        • Branner, Noah S. “The Kinkafu Collection of Ancient Japanese Songs.” MN 23: 3/4 (1968), 229-320 [Introduction]; “Ancient Japanese Songs from The Kinkafu Collection.” ibid, 275-320  [Translation]. [MN site notes: “Includes translations of selected songs from Kinkafu, Kojiki, Nihonshoki, and Kokinwakashū.”]
        • Kinkaishū 金槐集

        • Private poetry collection (“Collection of Golden Locust Waka”) of third shogun Minamoto no Sanetomo 源実朝 (1192-1219), compiled after his death. 633 poems in total.
        • Five waka tr. in discussion in Keene, Seeds, 1993, 700-705.
        • e-text (Shinchōsha koten shūsei) at Kotenmura.
        • Kinyōshū / Kinyōwakashū 金葉和歌集

        • 5th imperial anthology (1127) commissioned by Retired Emperor Shirakawa.
        • 10 vols., 648 poems. Compiled by Minamoto Toshiyori.
        • e-text (SNBT) at Kotenmura
        • Kobi no ki 孤媚記

        • Written in 1101 by Ōe no Masafusa 大江匡房 (1041-1111).
        • Tr. as “A Record of Fox-Magic” in Ury, Marian, “A Heian Note on the Supernatural,” JATJ 22.2 (1988), 189-194.
        • Ivo Smits, “An Early Anthropologist?  Ōe no Masafusa’s ‘A Record of Fox Spirits'” in Peter F. Kornicki and I. J. McMullen, eds., Religion in Japan: Arrows to Heaven and Earth (Cambridge, 1996): 78-89. REV: Gary L. Ebersole in JJS 23.2 (1997): 475-7.
        • Kogo shūi 古語拾遺

        • Kato, Genchi, and Hikoshiro Hoshino. Kogoshui: Gleanings from Ancient Stories. Tokyo: The Zaidan-Hojin-Meiji-Seitoku Kinen-Gakkai (Meiji Japan Society), 1926.
        • Florenz, Karl. Die historischen Quellen der Shinto-Religion. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck und Ruprecht, 1919.
        • Kohon setsuwashū 古本説話集

        • Guelberg, Niels. Zur Typologie der Mittelalterlichen Japanischen Lehrdichtungen: Vorüberlegungen anhand des “Kohon Setsuwashū.” Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 1991.
        • Kojidan 古事談

          • “Tales about Old Matters.” Tale collection compiled by Fujiwara no Akikane (1160-1215)
          • Excerpts tr. in Keene, Seeds, 1993, 585-87.

          Kojiki 古事記

        • see also Kojiki kayō, next entry, for poetry.
        • Villani, Paolo. Kojiki: un racconto di antichi eventi. Venezia: Marsilio, 2006. 171 p. [Complete trans. into Italian]
        • Wehmeyer, Ann, trans. Kojiki-den [Motoori Norinaga] Book 1. Cornell University East Asia Series, Number 87. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell East Asia Program, 1997. [Commentary]
        • Borgen, Robert, and Marian Ury. “Readable Japanese Mythology: Selections from Kojiki and Nihonshoki.” JATJ 24.1 (1991), 61-97.
        • Kinoshita, Iwao. Kojiki, Aelteste japanische Reichsgeschichte. 3 vol, Fukuda, 1976. [complete German transl.: vol 3; vol 1/2: intro, annotations/romaji-transcription]
        • Selections tr. in Naumann, Zauberschale, 1973, 7-17.
        • Shibata, Masumi and Maryse Shibata. Kojiki. Paris: Maisonneuve et Larouse, 1969, reissued 1997.
        • Philippi, Donald L. Kojiki. Tokyo: University of Tokyo Press, 1968.
        • Wheeler, Post. The sacred scriptures of the Japanese, with all authoritative variants, chronologically arranged, setting forth the narrative of the creation of the cosmos, the divine descent of the sky-ancestor of the imperial house and the lineage of the earthly emperors, to whom the Sun-Deity has given the rule of the world unto ages eternal. New York: H. Schuman, 1952.
        • Marega, M. Kogiki… Bari, 1938 (Italian).
        • Pettazzoni, Raffaele. La mitologia giapponese secondo il primo libro del Kojiki. Bologna: N. Zanichelli, 1929. [Book 1 only]
        • Florenz, Karl. Translated in: Die historischen Quellen der Shinto- Religion. Aus dem Altjapanischen und Chinesischen übersetzt und erklärt. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1919. Reprint edition (1997). Webcat.
        • Chamberlain, Basil Hall. “Ko-ji-Ki.” TASJ X supplement (1882). //   “Ko-ji-ki” = 古事記, or “Records of ancient matters.” London: Lane, Crawford, 1883. Frequently reprinted thereafter (1906, 1936, 1971, etc.)  with additional notes by William George Aston. The latest Tuttle reprint has the title: The Kojiki: records of ancient matters. See also vol. 5 of Collected works of Basil Hall Chamberlain, published by Ganesha, 2000.
        • Brownlee, John S. Political Thought in Japanese Historical Writing from Kojiki (712) to Tokushi yoron (1712). Waterloo, Ontario: Wilfrid Laurier UP, 1991.
        • e-text ed. A. Okajima (from Teisei kundoku kojiki, “many errors”)
        • Kojiki kayō 古事記歌謡

        • Cranston, Edwin A. A Waka Anthology: Volume One: The Gem-Glistening Cup. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1993. [kiki kayō, poems from Kojiki and Nihon shoki]
        • e-text ed. A. Okajima
        • Koke no koromo 苔の衣

        • (Kamakura-period monogatari)
        • Kokin wakashū 古今和歌集

        • Complete translations
        • McCullough, Helen C. Kokin Wakashū: The First Imperial Anthology of Japanese Poetry. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1985.
        • Rodd, Laurel Rasplica, and M. C. Henkenius. Kokinshū: A Collection of Poems Ancient and Modern with a study of the Chinese influences on the Kokinshū prefaces by J. T. Wixted and an annotated translation of the Chinese preface by L. Grzanka: Princeton UP, 1984.
        • Honda, H. H. The Kokin Waka-shū: the 10th century anthology edited by the Imperial edict. Hokuseido Press, 1970.
        • Sagiyama, Ikuko. Kokin Waka shū : raccolta di poesie giapponesi antiche e moderne. Milano: Ariele, 2000. 686 pp.
        • Bonneau, Georges. Le monument poétique de Heian: le Kokinshū. 3 vols. Paris, 1933-5.
        • Selections include:
        • Cranston, Edwin A. A Waka Anthology: Grasses of Remembrance. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006. 1263 pp.
        • Garde, René. Songe d’une nuit de printemps. Arles: Philippe Picquier, 1998. [Selection of about 120 love poems from Kokinshū and Shinkokinshū]
        • Ackermann, Peter, and Angelika Kretschmer. Die vier Jahreszeiten: Gedichte aus dem Kokin Wakashū. Frankfurt am Main: Insel, 2000. 263 p.
        • Strmen, Karol. Kokinsu: piesne z Cisarskeho uradu pre poeziu. Bratislava: Petrus, 1998. 149 p. [Contents not confirmed.]
        • Berndt, Jurgen. Rotes Laub: altjapanische Lyrik. Leipzig: Insel, 1972. 130 p. [Includes poems from Man’yoshū]
        • Lange, R. Altjapanische Frühlingslieder aus der Sammlung Kokinwakashū. Berlin: Weidmannsche Buchhandlung, 1884
        • Florenz, Karl. Wörterbuch zur altjapanischen Liedersammlung Kokinshū. Hamburg: Friederichsen & Co., 1925. [Introduction to classical Japanese through grammatical explanation of the poems]
        • For more early translations see Herail 1986: 30.
        • Selections in many anthologies: Sato and Watson 1981; Bownas and Thwaite 1964; Keene, Anthology, 1955, pp. 76-81 (trans. Waley, Rexroth, Keene). Also in Cranston, “Dark Path,” 1975.
        • e-text ed. Lewis Cook at Japanese Text Initiative
        • e-text ed. Prof. Higuchi at Kyushu Univ.
        • studies
        • Kokin waka shū jo kikigaki: san ryu sho (Kikigaki) 古今和歌集序聞書:三流抄

        • “Lecture notes on the preface to the Kokin waka shū: selected comments from the three schools, ca. 1270; attr. Tameaki” (Klein, Allegories, 2002, p. 339).
        • Klein, Allegories, 2002, pp. 156, 188-189, et passim [Excerpts in translation].
        • Kokin rokujō / Kokinwakarokujō 古今和歌六帖

        • compiled by 987 by Minamoto Shitagō or Prince Kaneakira
        • many tr. in: Waley, Arthur. Japanese Poetry: the Uta. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1919.
        • Kokonchomonjū 古今著聞集

        • “Anecdotes heard from writers ancient and modern” (Klein, Allegories of Desire, 2002).
        • Klein, Allegories of Desire, 2002, p. 81-82 (I:178), 86-67 (I:204), 193-94.
        • Morrell, Robert. “Kamakura Buddhism in the Literary Tradition, with special reference to the Buddhist Section (shakkyoo) in ‘Stories Heard from Writers Old and New (Kokonchomonjuu, 1254)'” in Richard Karl Payne, ed., Re-Visioning “Kamakura” Buddhism. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1998. [Complete translations, pp. 79-90, of several short stories/anecdotes, Book 2:62 to 2:71.]
        • Guelberg, Niels. “Shakyamunis Lehre in den Augen von Tachibana no Narisue – Betrachtungen zum Kokon chomonjuu anhand des 2. Faszikels -” Wasserspuren. Festschrift Wolfram Naumann, 1997.
        • Dykstra, Yoshiko. “Notable Tales Old and New: Tachibana Narisue’s Kokon Chomonjū.” MN 47: 4 (1992), 469-493. 17 tales (references are to Shinchosha edition): 57 (Buddhism); 173 (Waka); 257 (Instrumental Music, Song, and Dance); 290 (Calligraphy); 311 (Filial Piety and Affection); 322, 329 (Love); 336 (Military Prowess); 377 (Wrestling and Strength); 423 (Gambling); 433 (Robberies); 454 (Grief); 553 (Humorous Sayings and Repartee); 596 (Monsters); 694, 699, 713 (Creatures).
        • Tyler, Royall. Japanese Tales. New York: Pantheon, 1987. 13 tales: 45 (RT103): ii.12 (Buddhism) 246, 265 (RT6, 47): vii.16, 35 (Instrumental Music, Song, and Dance) 385, 386 (RT 96, 39): xvi.2,3 (Painting) 599, 601, 603, 605, 606, 607 (RT 92, 194, 204, 193, 80, 122): xxvii.11, 13, 15, 17, 18, 19 (Monsters) 681, 682 (RT 81, 107): xxx.8, 9 (Creatures).
        • Morrell, Robert E. “Kamakura accounts of Myōe Shōnin as popular religious hero.” JJRS 9/2-3 (1982), 171–98 (online) [Includes translation of part of tale about Myōe, pp. 175-76.]
        • Eckardt, Hans. Das Kokonchomonshū des Tachibana Narisue also Musikgeschichtesquelle. Göttingen Asiatische Forschungen, Bd. 6. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 1956. [Tr. of anecdotes from ch. 6 concerning music, pp. 62-123.] REV: Harich-Schneider MN 12 (1956-7).
        • Text: Nishio Kochi, Kobayashi Yasuharu, eds. Kokonchomonju. 2 vols. Shin Nihon Koten shūsei. Tokyo: Shinchōsha, 1983.
        • Komachi sōshi 小町草子 (Muromachi tale)

        • “The Story of Komachi” tr. Nicholas Teele in Teele, Ono no Komachi, 1993, pp. 43-56.
        • Komachi uta-arasoi 小町歌争い (Muromachi tale)

        • “The Arguments of Komachi” tr. Nicholas Teele in Teele, Ono no Komachi, 1993, pp. 57-71.
        • Konjaku monogatarishū 今昔物語集

        • “Tales of Times Now Past.” Largest collection of setsuwa (tales). Compiled between 1130-40?
        • DeWolf, Charles. Translations appearing in Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Japan, 4th series, 11 (1996), 199-205; 14 (2000), 59-70, 19 (2004), [to add: citation for most recent translation of tales 27:41, 28:41, also book/tale ref. for earlier translations.] // “The Tale of a Wicked Monk: An Excerpt from Konjaku Monogatari Commentary, Translation, and Notes.”  Language, Culture, and Communication, No. 21, Keio University 1998.]
        • Hérail, Françine. Gouverneurs de province et guerriers dans les histoires qui sont maintenant du passé : Konjaku monogatarishu. Paris: Collège de France, Institut des Hautes Etudes Japonaises, 2004.  ISBN: 2913217109. [ns][Webcat]
        • Dykstra, Yoshiko. “Six tales from the Japanese section of the Konjaku monogatari.” Journal of Intercultural Studies (Osaka) 21(1994), pp. 1-15.
        • Lavigne-Kurihara, Dominique. Histoires d’amour du temps jadis. Arles, France: Editions Philippe Picquier, 1998. 203 pages. [24 tales: 19:5 (vol. 19, no. 5); 20:7; 22:7, 8; 24:8, 50; 26:4; 27:25, 26; 28:1; 29:3, 28; 30:1-4, 5, 8, 10-13; 31:33, 34.]
        • Tyler, Tales, 1987. 341 pages, incl. indexes and bibliography. [Trans. of more than 100 tales: 11:7, 13, 25, 29; 12:7, 24, 28, 31, 33; 13:1-2, 10, 33-34, 41, 43; 14:3, 7-8; 42-44; 15:1, 20, 23, 28, 41; 16:15, 17, 20, 29, 32; 17:17, 26, 33, 42, 44, 47; 19:3, 8, 14, 29, 32; 20:1-2, 4, 7, 10-11; 23:22; 24:1, 15, 19-20, 24; 25:11; 26:8-9, 11; 27:1-2, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 19, 21-22, 24, 29, 31-32, 36-37, 40-41; 28:5, 11-12, 18, 24-25, 28-29, 39-41; 29:1, 5, 17-19, 21, 28, 35-36, 39-40; 30:1, 9, 14; 31:7-10, 12-13, 15, 17, 33, 37.]
        • Dykstra, Yoshiko Kurata. The Konjaku Tales: from a Medieval Japanese Collection. 5 vols. Intercultural Research Institute monograph series no. 17-18, 23, 25, 27. Osaka: Kansai University of Foreign Studies, 1986-. [Complete translation in five vols.: Indian Section, Part 1/Part 2, Chinese Section, Japanese Section, Part 1/Part 2.]
        • Nakamura and Ceccatty, Mille Ans, 1982, pp. 113-121. [Tales 29:3, 29:23; 30:1.]
        • Ury, Marian. Tales of Times Now Past: Sixty-Two Stories from a Medieval Japanese Collection. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1979. Republished in Michigan classics in Japanese studies, no. 9, Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan, 1993. 199 pages. [Trans. of 1:1, 1:8, 1:11, 1:18, 2:1, 2:21, 3:14, 3:18, 4:9, 4:24, 4:34, 4:41, 5:2, 5:13, 6:34, 6:35, 7:18, 9:4, 9:44, 9:45, 10:1, 10:8, 10:12, 10:13, 11:3, 11:4, 12:28, 13:10, 13:39, 14:3, 14:5, 15:28, 16:17, 16:20, 16:32, 17:1, 17:2, 17:44, 19:8, 19:24, 20:35, 22:8, 23:14, 24:2, 24:23, 24:24, 25:11, 26:9, 27:15, 27:22, 27:29, 27:41, 28:5, 28:11, 28:38, 29:18, 29:23, 29:28, 30:5, 31:7, 31:31, 31:37 (total of 62 tales).]
        • Matisoff, Legend, 1978, pp. 165-172. [Tale 4:4 and 24:23]
        • Kelsey, W. Michael. “Konjaku Monogatari-shu: Toward an Understanding of Its Literary Qualities.” MN 30: 2 (1975), 121-50.
        • Wilson, William Ritchie. “The Way of the Bow and Arrow. The Japanese Warrior in Konjaku Monogatari.” MN 28.2 (1973): 177-233. Trans. of 25:1-14, 23:14.
        • Naumann, Zauberschale, 1973, 147-215. [38 tales tr. into German: 13:34; 16:7; 19:18; 19:20; 20:10; 20:13; 23:16; 23:19; 23:22; 23:23; 23:25; 24:8; 24:55; 25:7; 26:2; 26:13; 26:18; 28:2; 28:6; 28:11; 28:11; 28:16; 28:18; 28:20; 28:23; 28:24; 28:39; 28:44; 29:18; 29:19; 29:22; 29:23; 29:29; 29:31; 29:39; 30:14; 31:15; 32:25. Title tr. as “Geschichten, die jetzt schon lange her sind.”]
        • Hammitzsch, Horst, ed., Ingrid Schuster and Klaus Muller, tr. Erzählungen des alten Japan: aus dem Konjaku-monogatari. Stuttgart: Reclam, 1965. [23 tales tr. into German: 17:26, 20:11, 20:15; 20:18, 22:4, 23:17, 23:18, 24:9, 24:57, 25:2, 26:20, 27:8, 27:15, 27:16, 27:44, 28:20; 28:28, 28:33, 29:11, 29:36, 29:38; 30:11, 30:13.]
        • Frank, Bernard. Histoires qui sont maintenant du passe. Gallimard/Unesco, 1968. 336 pages. [59 tales tr. into French: 1:1, 31; 2:4; 3:22; 4:13, 28; 5:4; 6:5, 12, 43; 7:10, 12; 9:2; 10:4-5, 21, 36, 40; 11:10, 25, 28; 12:8, 18, 31; 13:12; 14:3; 15:39; 16:4; 17:8, 33; 19:6, 18; 20:12, 38, 40; 22:1; 23:26; 24:5, 20, 23; 25:12; 26:2; 27:10, 13, 24, 45; 28:18, 21; 29:8, 26, 38; 30:1, 11; 31:8, 27-28, 36-37.]
        • Jones, S. W. Ages Ago: Thirty-Seven Tales from the Konjaku Monogatari Collection. Harvard University Press, 1959. 175 pages, incl. index. [37 tales: 2:20; 3:14; 4:9, 40; 5:13, 14, 20, 24, 25, 32; 6:2, 3; 9:2, 11; 10:7, 9, 13, 21; 23:19, 22, 23; 24:4, 5, 8, 20, 26; 25:4; 26:2, 7, 11; 27:5, 21; 28:3, 34; 29:32; 31:9, 27.]
        • Daniels, Selections from Japanese Literature, 1953. [Tales 24:34 and 28:44]
        • Tsukakoshi, Satoshi. Konjaku: altjapanische Geschichte aus dem Volk zur Heian-Zeit. Zurich: Max Niehans, 1956.
        • Brower, Robert H. “The Konzyaku monogatarisyū : An Historical and Critical Introduction, with Annotated Translations of Seventy-eight Tales.” Ph.D. dissertation. Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1952. [Available as PDF from ProQuest]. [78 tales translated in Volume II. Translations from the Konzyaku Monogatarisyū, Scrolls 11-31, pp. 363ff. [TOC 363–369, translations pp. 370–1060], : no. 11:1, 11:10, 11:32, 12:7 12:11, 12:20, 12:24, 13:8, 13:38, 14:3; 14:8, 14.20, 14:29, 14:42, 15:16, 15:47, 16:28, 16:37, 17:6, 17:25, 17:38, 17:47; 19:2, 18:4, 19:21, 19:24, 19:44, 20:7, 20:18, 20:20, 20:34, 20:44, 22:7, 23:15, 23:21, 24:5, 24:16, 24.30, 24:55, 25:5, 25:13, 26:4, 26:5, 26:7, 26:10, 26:16, 26:19, 27:2, 27:3, 27:14, 27:22, 27:26, 27:31, 27:34, 28:1, 28:6, 28:20; 28:30, 28:38, 28:42; 29:3, 29:9, 29:17, 29:23, 29:26, 29:31, 30:1, 30:9, 30:13, 31:3, 31:7, 31:11, 31:18, 31:20, 31:29, 31:31, 31:34]
        • Revon, Anthologie, 1910. [Selections]
        • e-text and fascimile on Kyoto Univ. library site (books 2, 5, 7, 9, 10, 12, 17, 17, 29)
        • See entryon studies page. Studies available online include: Mori Masato, “Konjaku Monogatari-shū: Supernatural Creatures and Order.” JJRS 9/2-3 (June-Sept. 1982), 147-170. [online] [Discusses tales from book 27.]
        • Ko-otoko no sōshi 小男草子 (Muromachi tale)

        • tr. as “The Little Man” in Skord, Tales of Tears and Laughter, 1991.
        • kōwakamai (genre) 幸若舞

        • Trede, Melanie. Image, Text and Audience: The Taishokan Narrative in Visual Representations of the Early Modern Period in Japan (Hamburg, New York: Peter Lang Verlag 2003), 27–53. [translation of the wide-spread Daigashira version of Taishokan, printed and illustrated in 1632]
        • Squires, Todd Andrew. “Reading the Kōwaka-mai as Medieval Myth: Story-Patterns, Traditional Reference and Performance in Late Medieval Japan.” PhD dissertation. Ohio State University, 2001. Contains translations of Daijin, Iruka, Shida, Taishokan, pp. 591-862. [UMI number 302256.]
        • Araki, James T. “Yuriwaka and Ulysses: The Homeric Epics at the Court of Ouchi Yoshitaka.”
          MN 33: 1 (1978), 1-36.
        • Araki, James T. The Ballad-Drama of Medieval Japan. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1964. [Includes tr. of “Atsumori” and “Izumigajō” (Izumi’s Fortress)].
        • Schneider, Roland. Kowaka-mai. Sprache und Stil einer mittelälterlichen japanischen Rezitationskunst. (= MOAG 51), 305 S., Hamburg 1968 (originally Diss. Univ. Hamburg 1967) [reviewed by E. May in ZDMG 123/I (1973) ][Detailed table of contents online]
        • Discussion in P.D.Perkins, Keiichi Fujii, “Two Ancient Japanese Dances,” MN 3.1 (1940), 314-320.
        • Kōya monogatari 高野物語

        • Tr. as “The Tale of Kōya” in Childs, Rethinking Sorrow, 1991.
        • Kujiki, see Sendaikuji

          Kūkai 空海 (Writings by)

        • Kūkai, known as Kōbō daishi 弘法大師 (774-835)
        • Yamamoto, Chikyo. Works of St. Kōbō Daishi. Koyasan: Koyasan University, 1993. 641 pp.
        • Kawahara, Eiho, and C. Yuho Jobst. Kūkai, Ausgewählte Schriften: Sokushin-jōbutsu-gi, Shōji-jissō-gi, Unji-gi, Hannya-shingyō-hiken. Munich: Iudicium, 1992. [即身成仏義, 声字実相義, 吽字義, 般若心経秘鍵]
        • Grapard, Allan. La verité finale des trois enseignements / Kūkai. Paris: Poiesis, 1985
          121 p. [Sangō Shiiki 三教指帰]
        • Hakeda, Yoshito S. Kūkai: with an account of his life and a study of his thought. New York: Columbia UP, 1972. 303 pp. REV: Ury, MN 28 (1973).
        • Hakeda, Yoshito S. “The Religious Novel of Kukai.” MN 20: 3/4 (1965), 283-97.
        • Kūkai sōzu den (ca. 835) 空海僧都伝

        • Trans. included in Bohner, Hermann. “Kōbō Daishi.” MN 6 (1943), 287-292.
        • Kume uta 久米歌

        • Naumann, Nelly. Kume-Lieder und Kume: zu einem Problem der japanischen Frühgeschichte. Marburg: Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft. Wiesbaden : Kommissionsverlag Steiner, 1981. 142 p. Japanese translation: 「久米歌と久米」ネリー・ナウマン著 ; 桧枝陽一郎訳 (言叢社, 1997)
        • kusemai 曲舞 genre

        • Goff, Janet. “Noh and Its Antecedents: ‘Journey to the Western Provinces'” in Hare et al., The Distant Isle (1996), 165-181. [On kusemai song “Saikoku kudari” (Journey to the Western Provinces)]
        • kyōgen (genre) 狂言

        • Medieval theatrical genre, sometimes tr. as “farce.” 
        • For an alphabetical list of plays by Japanese title, see kyōgen page on this site.
        • Brazell, Karen. Traditional Japanese Theater: An Anthology of Plays: Columbia UP, 1998. [Kaminari 神鳴 tr. Royall Tyler, Futari daimyō 二人大名 tr. Richard McKinnon, Busu 附子 tr. Don Kenny, Kusabira くさびら tr. Carolyn Anne Morley, Kagyū 蝸牛 tr. Don Kenny, Kamabara 鎌腹 tr. Ayako Kano, Kanaoka tr. Carolyn Haynes, Semi 蝉 tr. Carolyn Haynes]
        • Morley, Carolyn A. “Plovers: A Tarō Kaja Play,” in Heinrich, Currents, 1997, 323-335 [Chidori 千鳥]
        • Morley, Carolyn Anne. Transformation, Miracles, and Mischief: The Mountain Priest Plays of Kyōgen. Ithaca, N.Y., 1993. [Kani yamabushi 蟹山伏, Tsuto yamabushi 苞山伏, Kusabira くさびら, Fukurō yamabushi 梟山伏, Kaki yamabushi 柿山伏, Koshi inori 腰祈, Negi yamabushi 禰宜山伏, Kagyū 蝸牛]
        • Brazell, Karen, ed. Twelve Plays of the Noh and Kyōgen Theaters. Ithaca, New York: 1988. [Bōshibari 棒縛 tr. Eileen Kato, Semi 蝉 tr. Carolyn Haynes, Hoshigahaha  法師が母 tr. Carolyn Haynes]
        • Sieffert, René. Nō et Kyōgen. 2 vols. Paris: P.O.F. 1979. [Reprint 2000] [Vol. 1: Fuku no kami 福の神, Nariagari 成上り, Narihira mochi 業平餅, Jishaku 磁石, Setsubun 節分, Fumi-ninai 文荷, Dondarō 鈍太郎, Shūron 宗論, Sado-gitsune 佐渡狐, Bō-shibari 棒縛, Nushi 塗師, Naki-ama 泣尼, Tō-zumō 唐相撲, Ka-zumō 蚊相撲, Inaba-dō 因幡堂, Sannin katawa 三人片輪, Naru kami 鳴神, Tsūen, Mizukake-muko 水掛聟, Asahina 朝比奈. Vol. 2: Suehirogari 末広, Utsubo-zaru 靱猿, Oni-gawara 鬼瓦, Roku jizō 六地蔵, Nabe yatsubachi 鍋八撥, Keimyō 鶏猫, Uko Sako [=Oko Sako] 右近左近, Tsukimi-zato 月見座頭, Suō otoshi 素袍落, Bōbō-gashira 茫々頭, Kintōzaemon 金藤左右衛門, Fumi yamadachi 文山立, Kuriyaki 栗焼, Chidori 千鳥, Susugi-gawa [ ], Kusabira くさびら, Niwatori muko 鶏聟, Ki rokuda 木六駄, Hige yagura 髭櫓, Makura monogurui  枕物狂.]
        • Tyler, Royall. Granny Mountains: A Second Cycle of No Plays. Ithaca, N.Y., 1978. [Hanago 花子, Asaina 朝比奈, Shibiri しびり, Tsūen 通円, Jizō-mai 地蔵舞]
        • Tyler, Royall. Pining Wind. A Cycle of Nō Plays. Ithaca, N.Y., 1978. [Matsuyani 松脂, Kaminari 神鳴, Oni-gawara 鬼瓦, Kani yamabushi 蟹山伏] 
        • Sieffert, René. Zeami, La tradition secrète du nō, suivie de Une journée de nō. Paris: G
        • Sakanishi, Shio. The Ink Smeared Lady and Other Kyōgen. Boston, 1938, repr. Tokyo, 1960. [Suminuri onna 墨塗女, Hone-kawa 骨革, Buaku 武悪, Kōji-dawara 柑子俵, Kitsune-zuka 狐塚, I-moji 伊文字, Oni no tsuchi, Oni-gawara 鬼瓦, Esashi jūō 餌差十王, Uri nusubito 瓜盗人, Dontarō 鈍太郎, Busu 附子, Fumi yamadachi 文山立, Niō 仁王, S, Kaminari 神鳴]
        • Sadler, A. L. Japanese Plays: Nō-Kyōgen-Kabuki. Sydney: Angus & Robertson Limited, 1934. [Akutarō 悪太郎, Asahina 朝比奈, Busshi& nbsp;仏師, Dontarō 鈍太郎, Ebisu Daikoku [夷大黒], Esashi jūō 餌差十王, Hi no sake 樋の酒, Ishigami 石神, Itoma-bukuro, Kaki uri, Kasa no shita, Ko susubito, Koyaku-neri, Mizukumi shinbochi& nbsp;[?=水汲], Oni-gawara 鬼瓦, Rakuami 楽阿弥, Rokunin [? =六人僧], Shibiri しびり, Shika-gari, Shuyo, Surigai koto, Tako, Tsūen 通円]
        • Peri, Noël. “Farces japonaises.” Japon et Extreme Orient, 1924. [Busu 附子, Hanako 花子, Hone-kawa, Kama-ppara 鎌腹, Niō 仁王, Rokunin sō [六人僧], Sōhachi [惣八・ 宗八], Suminuri onna, Tsuri kitsune& nbsp;釣狐, Yao jizō [八尾地蔵?]]
        • Waley, Arthur. “The Bird Catcher in Hades” in The Nō Plays of Japan (London: 1921). Reprinted in Keene, Anthology. [Esashi jūō 餌差十王]
        • Noguchi, Yone. Ten Kiogen in English. Tokyo, 1907. [Dobu-katchiri 丼礑, Kitsune-zuka 狐塚, Miyage no kagami, Niō 仁王, Nukegara 抜殻, Oba ga sake 伯母が酒 Oni-gawara 鬼瓦, Oni no tsuchi, Suminuri onna 墨塗女, Uri nusubito 瓜盗人]
        • Chamberlain, Basil Hall. “On the Medieval Colloquial Dialect of the Comedies.” TASJ (1879), vol. 6, part iii. Reprinted in Things Japanese (1902), 196ff. [Hone kawa]
        • For more early translations see Sakanishi, Ink Smeared Lady, 1938:139-150. For summaries of the 257 currently performed plays see Don Kenny, A Guide to Kyōgen (Tokyo: Hinoki Shoten, 1968 [4th revised edition 1990]).
        • STUDIES. The following articles discussing specific kyōgen plays include translations:  Haynes, Carolyn. “Parody in Kyōgen: Makura Monogurui and Tako.” MN 39: 3 (1984), 261-80; // Shibano, Dorothy T., tr. “Suehirogari: The Fan of Felicity.” MN 35: 1 (1980), 77-88. [末広] //
          Golay, Jacqueline. “Pathos and Farce, Zatō Plays of the Kyōgen Repetoire.” MN 28: 2 (Summer 1973), 139-149. [Discussion of Tsukimi-zatō 月 見座頭 and Kawakami-zatō 川 上座頭.]
        • Kyōgen rikugi 狂言六義

        • e-text from Matsusaka Univ. ftp site
        • Kyōunshū 狂雲集

        • “Crazy Cloud Anthology” by Ikkyū Sōjun 一休宗純 (1394-1481).
        • Stevens, John. Wild Ways: Zen Poems of Ikkyū. Boston, Mass.: Shambhala, 1995. 131 p.
        • Arntzen, Sonja. Ikkyū and the Crazy Cloud Anthology: A Zen Poet of Medieval Japan. Univ. of Tokyo Press, 1986. REV: Sanford MN 42.2 (1987).
        • Arntzen, Sonja. “The Poetry of the Kyōunshū ‘Crazy Cloud Anthology’ of Ikkyū Sōjun.” Ph.D. diss., Univ. of British Columbia, 1979. // See also: Ikkyū Sōjun: A Zen Monk and His Poetry. Occasional Paper no. 4, Program in East Asian Studies, Western Washington State College, 1973.
        • A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – M – N – O – R – S – T – U – W – Y – Z [return to top]

          Mai (genre) 舞 → see Kōwakamai (genre) 幸若舞

          Maigetsushō 毎月抄

          • “Monthly Notes” by Fujiwara no Teika 藤原定家 (1162-1241).
          • Brower, Robert H. “Fujiwara Teika’s Maigetsusho.” MN 40: 4 (1985), 399-426.

          Makura no sōshi 枕草子

        • “The Pillow Book” of Sei Shōnagon 清少納言 (c. 966 – ?)
        • McKinney, Meredith. The Pillow Book. Penguin Classics, 2007. 416 pp. [REV article, Machiko Midorikawa, MN 63:1 (Spring 2008), 143-160]
        • Czech trans. (Zapisky z volnych chvil: starojaponske literarni zapisniky, Praha : Odeon, 1984) with Tsurezuregusa and Hōjōki. 331 p.
        • Selections in German in Naumann, Zauberschale, 1973, 107-127.
        • Morris, Ivan. The Pillow Book of Sei Shōnagon. New York & London: Columbia/Oxford UP, 1967. [Penguin abridged edition, 1971][Shirane, TJL (2007), 248–285, reprints 22 sections with some changes.]
        • Watanabe, Mamoru. Das Kopfkissenbuch der Hofdame Sei Shōnagon. Stuttgart: Manesse, 1952.
        • Beaujard, Andre. Notes de chevet par Sei Shōnagon. Paris: Libraire Orientale et Americaine. Paris: Gallimard/Unesco, 1966. [O.P., first ed. 1934]
        • Waley, Arthur. The pillow book of Sei Shōnagon. London: George Allen, 1928. [Selections]
        • Pfizmaier, August. Die Aufzeichnungen der japanischen Dichterin, Sei Seo-Na-Gon. Vienna, 1875.
        • Also: Czech trans. (Zapisky z volnych chvil : starojaponske literarni zapisniky
          Praha : Odeon, 1984)
        • e-text at Japanese Text Initiative
        • Morris, Mark. “Sei Shōnagon’s Poetic Catalogues.” HJAS 40.1 (1980).
        • Man’yōshū 万葉集

        • Translations by Torquil Duthrie, Anne Commons, Jeremy Robinson, and Edwin Cranston in Shirane, TJL (2007), 60–109.
        • Sieffert, René. Man.yōshū. Paris: P.O.F., 1997-2003 [Complete French translation in five vols. Vol. 1, books 1-3; vol. 2, books 4-6; vol. 3, books 7-9; vol. 4, books 10-13; vol. 5, books. 14-20]
        • Peronny, Claude. Les plantes du Man.yō-shū. Paris: Maisonneuve et Larose. 249 pp. [Selections in parallel text format, Japanese / French]
        • Cranston, Edwin. A Waka Anthology: Volume One. 1993. [pbk 1997] [Generous selections with detailed discussion.]
        • Sieffert, René. Chants d’amour du Manyo-shū. Collection tama. Paris: POF, 1993. 95 pp.
        • Levy, Ian Hideo. The Ten Thousand Leaves: A Translation of the Man’yōshū, Japan’s Premier Anthology of Classical Poetry. Princeton, 1981. [Books 1-5] *Rev: Cranston, JJS 9.1 (Winter) (1983): 97-138.
        • Wright, Harold. Ten Thousand Leaves: Love Poems from the Man’yōshū. Woodstock, New York: The Overlook Press, 1981.
        • Cranston, Edwin. “Five Poetic Sequences from the Man’yōshū.” The Journal of the Association of Teachers of Japanese 13.1 (Apr., 1978), pp. 5-40. [JSTOR]
        • Honda, H.H. The Manyōshū, A New and Complete Translation. Tokyo: Hokuseido Press, 1967.
        • Pierson, J. L., Jr. The Manyoshu. 18 vols. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1929-64. Complete translation. Pierson also published a Character Dictionary of the Manyoshu [1967] and General Index of the Manyoshu [1969]. REV: Dumoulin, MN 11 (1955).
        • Nippon Gakujutsu Shinkōkai. The Manyoshū: One Thousand Poems. Tokyo: Iwanami, 1940. Reprinted: New York: Columbia UP, 1965. 
        • Dickins, F. Victor. “Manyōshiu: The Long Lays” in Primitive and Mediaeval Japanese Texts (Oxford, 1906):  “Translations” volume, pp. 1-303;  transliterated text in companion volume of “Romanized Texts,” pp. 1-193. Reprinted in Collected works of Frederick Victor Dickins; v. 6-7 (Bristol: Ganesha / Tokyo : Edition Synapse, 1999).
        • See also entry on studies page.
        • Masakadoki 将門記 → see Shōmonki

          Masukagami 増鏡

        • “The Clear Mirror.” Historical tale of the Muromachi period.
        • Perkins, George. The Clear Mirror : A Chronicle of the Japanese Court During the Kamakura Period (1185-1333). Stanford: Stanford UP, 1998. (Selections also in McCullough, ed., Classical Japanese Prose, 1990.)
        • Siegmund, Ingrid. “Die Politik des Exkaisers Gotoba und die historischen Hintergründe des Shokyu no ran unter besonderer Berücksichtigung des Masukagami.” Diss. Dr. phil., University of Bonn, 1978. [Includes transl. of introduction and maki 1-2]
        • “The Exile of Godaigo” from Masukagami, book XVI, trans. Donald Keene in Keene, Anthology of Japanese Literature … to the 19th Century, 243-257.
        • The title has also been translated as The Larger Mirror.
        • Matsura no miya monogatari 松浦宮物語

        • “The Tale of the Matsura Palace.” Fictional tale by Fujiwara no Teika 藤原定家 (1162-1241).
        • Lammers, Wayne P. The Tale of Matsura: Fujiwara Teika‘s Experiment in Fiction. Ann Arbor, Mich.: Center for Japanese Studies, U. of Michigan, 1992.
        • Medieval historical documents

          • Tens of thousands of documents survive from the medieval period. While only a few have been translated into English, or are likely ever to appear in translation, it seems only proper to make references to some notable translations here. Many of the texts have no title as such, appearing in numbered collections of documents like Kamakura ibun. Even when texts have been given a name, their titles are unfamiliar to most of us, and in any case many are translated as examples of a certain kind of document. Although a variety of different works are included here, they are listed simply in reverse chronological order of publication.
          • Conlan, Thomas. “The Nature of Warfare in Fourteenth-Century Japan: The Record of Nomoto Tomoyuki.” Journal of Japanese Studies, 25: 2. (Summer, 1999), 299-330. [Discussion with translations of a document “summarizing numerous petitions [for military reward,  gunchūjō] and reports of arrival [chakutōjō] written from 1335 to 1337,” p. 302] *add KANJI for terms
          • Steenstrup, Carl. “Sata Mirensho: A Fourteenth-Century Law Primer.” MN 35: 4 (Winter, 1980), 405-435. [Compiled in Kamakura sometime between 1319 and 1322. Trans. of Sata Mirensho 沙汰未練書 (“A Book for Those Unskilled in Legal Matters”) from p. 408. Complete romanized transcription included.]
          • Steenstrup, Carl. “The Gokurakuji Letter. Hōjō Shigetoki’s Compendium of Political and Religious Ideas of Thirteenth-Century Japan ” MN 32: 1 (Spring, 1977), 1-34. [Second surviving buke kakun 武家家訓読,  warrior family precepts, “committed to writing by the head of an ichimon, that is, a hierachically organized lineage of a main family and its branch families, for the benefit of his successors” (p. 1).  Trans. of Gokurakuji-dono go-shōsoku  極楽寺殿御消息 (“The Gokurakuji Letter”) by Hōjō Shigetoki 北条重時 (1198-1261) from p. 7.)
          • Steenstrup, Carl. “The Imagawa Letter: A Muromachi Warrior’s Code of Conduct Which Became a Tokugawa Schoolbook.” MN 28: 3(Autumn, 1973), 295-316. [Imagawa-jō 今川状 (“The Imagawa Letter”), also called Gusoku Nakaaki Seishi Jōjō 愚息仲秋制詞條々 (“Articles of Admonition by Imagawa Ryōshun to His Son Nakaaki”),  and Imagawa Heikisho 今川壁書 (p. 295, ftn. 6). Attributed to Imagawa Sadayo 今川貞世 or Ryōshun 了俊 (1325-1420). Translation from p. 299. )
          • Steenstrup, Carl. “Hōjo Sōun’s Twenty-One Articles. The Code of Conduct of the Odawara Hōjō.” MN 29: 3 (Autumn, 1974), 283-303. [Hōjō Sōun 北条早雲 (1432-1519), a “self-made daimyo with an unusual career” (p. 283). The Articles lay down “standards for the political and private behavior of the ‘later Hōjō'” (p. 287). Trans. of Sōunjidono nijūichi kajō 早雲寺殿廿一箇条 (“Twenty-One Articles by Lord Sōun”) from p. 289.]
          • Steenstrup, Carl. ” [ ] .” Acta Orientalia XXXVI (Copenhagen, 1974). [Translations of first buke kakun (warrior family precept, see above), “The Letter to Nagatoki” (Rokuhara Sagami no kami no shisoku wo oshiuru…jō 六波羅相模守ノ教子息…状), written between 1237 and 1247, pp. 417-38. Reference in Streenstup 1977, MN 32:1, p. 2, ftn. 7. (n.s.)]

          Meigetsuki 明月記

        • “The Record of the Clear Moon” (or “Chronicle of the Bright Moon”). Diary of years 1180-1235 by Fujiwara no Teika.
        • Menoto no fumi 乳母のふみ

        • [“The Nurse’s Letter”] by Abutsu 阿仏.
        • e-text ed. and annotated by M. Shibata (GSRJ)
        • Michinaga (poetry) 道長

        • Fujiwara no Michinaga (995-1018)
        • Hérail, Françine. poèmes de Fujiwara no Michinaga, ministre a la cour de Heian (995-1018): Traduction du Midō Kanpakuki. Geneva: Libraire Droz, 1993.
        • Midō kanpakuki 御堂関白記

        • “Records of the Midō Chancellor.” Diary by Fujiwara no Michinaga (995-1018), covery the years 995-1021. [Keene, Seeds, 398-9.]
        • Hérail, Francine. Notes journalieres de Fujiwara no Michinaga, ministre a la cour de Heian (995-1018): Traduction du Midō Kanpakuki. 3 vols. Hautes etudes orientales II, 23. Institut des hautes études japonaises. Geneva: Libraire Droz, 1987-91. // REV. Marian Ury, JJS 16.2 (1990); William McCullough, HJAS 50.2 (Dec. 1990), 749-761.
        • Minase sangin hyakuin 水無瀬三吟百韻

        • “A hundred stanzas by three poets at Minase” (Sōgi 宗祇, Shōhaku 肖柏, Sōchō 宗長, 1488). For another famous work by the same renga poets, see Yuyama sangin hyakuin.
        • Miner, Earl. Japanese Linked Poetry. Princeton, 1979.
        • Yasuda, Kenneth. Minase sangin hyakuin… Tokyo, 1956.
        • “Three Poets at Minase” (selections) tr. Keene in Donald Keene, Anthology, New York, 1955, 314-321.
        • e-text ed. Nishioka (*check)
        • e-text (~w-hill)
        • Miyako-ji no wakare 都路のわかれ

        • Account of journey from Kyoto to Kamakura made in 1275 by Asukai Masaari 飛鳥井雅章 (1240-1301)
        • Discussion with tr. of excerpts in Pigeot, Michiyuki-bun, p. 192 et passim.
        • text ed. Sasaki Nobutsuna, Asukai Masaari nikki, Koten bunko, 1949.
        • Miyako no tsuto 都のつと

        • Plutschow and Fukuda,  Four Japanese Travel Diaries, 1981, pp. 61-75 (“Souvenir for the Capital”).
        • Travel diary written between 1350-2. Attributed in postscript to Priest Sōkyū 釈宗久.
        • Mizu kagami 水鏡

        • “The Water Mirror.” Kamakura period history. Once ascribed to Nakayama Tadachika 中山忠親, though no mention of his authorship in his diary Sankaiki 山槐記.
        • Account from reigns of Emperors Jinmu to Jinmyō.
        • Mōgyū waka 蒙求和歌

          • “Meng Ch’iu Waka.” Twenty-five episodes chosen from a Chinese collection of biographies. Compiled in 1204 by Minamoto no Mitsuyuku 源光行 (1163-1244).
          • One example tr. in Keene, Seeds, 1993, 583-84.

          Mōko shūrai ekotoba 蒙古襲来絵詞

        • Conlan, Thomas D. In Little Need of Divine Intervention: Takezaki Suenaga’s Scrolls of the Mongol Invasions of Japan. Ithaca, New York: East Asia Program, Cornell University, 2001. [Online: pp. 254-76 of study.] REV: Haruko Wakabayashi, JJRS 31/1 (2004) pdf.
        • Thomas Conlan has also prepared an excellent multimedia site on the scrolls: www.bowdoin.edu/mongol-scrolls/
        • Monjo 文書

        • Generic name for documents. Some collections of translations include:
        • de Longrais, F. Joüon. Age de Kamakura, Sources (1150-1333). Archives, Chartes Japanaise (Monjo). Tokyo : Maison Franco-Japonaise, 1950.
        • Asakawa, Kan’ichi. The Documents of Iriki. Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1927. Republished1955. Online version at Historiographical Institute, University of Tokyo.
        • Mass, Jeffrey. The Kamakura Bakufu. Stanford UP, 1976.
        • Monogusa taro 物ぐさ太郎

        • Muromachi tale. NKBT 38. “Tarō the Loafer” (C. Steven).
        • Skord, Virginia. Tales of Tears and Laughter, 1991, 185-202. // Skord, Virginia. “Monogusa Taro. From Rags to Riches and beyond.”MN 44: 2 (1989), 171-198.
        • Kubota, Yoko. “Monokusa Tarō: un otogizōshi sulla vita di un fannullone.” Il Giappone 26 (1986), 23-47.
        • Muchimaro-den 武智麻呂伝

          • Biography written by priest Enkei 延慶 of Fujiwara no Muchimaro 藤原武智麻呂 (680-737), eldest son of Fujiwara no Fuhito 藤原不比等. Muchimaro’s descendants formed the Nanke 南家 branch of the Fujiwara.
          • Bohner, Hermann. “Muchimaro-den. Kaden 家伝, d.i. Haustraditionen (des Hauses Fujiwara). Unterer (Band).” MN 5: 2 (July 1942), 412-436. [Trans. from p. 419.]

          Mumyōshō 無名抄

        • “The Nameless Treatise” (PCCJL p. 177). Discussion of poetry and poets (1209-10).
        • Kato, Hilda. “The Mumyōshō.” MN 23: 3/4 ((1968), 351-430. // “The Mumyoshō of Kamo no Chōmei and its significance in Japanese Literature.” MN 23: 3/4 (1968), 321-350.
        • Pandey, Rajyashree. Writing and Renunciation in Medieval Japan. The Works of the Poet-Priest Kamo no Chōmei. Michigan Monograph Series in Japanese Studies, 21. Ann Arbor, 1999.
        • Mumyōzōshi 無名草子

        • “Untitled Leaves” “The Story Without a Name,” or “The Tale Without a Name,” ca. 1201.
        • Sieffert, René. D’une lectrice du Genji. Paris: P.O.F., 1994. p. 94 .
        • Marra, Michele. “Mumyōzōshi.” MN 39: 2-4 (1984), 115-45, 281-305, 409-439.
        • Rohlich, Thomas H. “In Search of Critical Space: The Path to Monogatari Criticism in The Mumyōzōshi.” HJAS 57.1 (June 1997), 179-204.
        • Müller, Wolfram Harald [-Yokota]. “Das Mumyōzōshi und seine Kritik am Genji-Monogatari.” Hamburg Diss.phil. 1956. // Oriens Extremus 3.1956:2, 205-214, Oriens Extremus 4.1957:1, 70-103.
        • Murasaki shikibu nikki 紫式部日記

        • “The Murasaki Shikibu Diary”; 1010.
        • Bowring, Richard. Murasaki Shikibu: Her Diary and Poetic Memoirs. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton UP, 1982. Revised translation: The Diary of Lady Murasaki (Penguin Classics), 1996. Excerpt reprinted in Shirane, TJL (2007), 449–452.
        • Sieffert, René. Murasaki Shikibu: Journal. Paris: P.O.F., 1978. 87 p.
        • Selections in German in Naumann, Zauberschale, 1973, 129-134.
        • Lowell, Omori and Doi, Diaries of Court Ladies of Old Japan, 1920.
        • Murasaki shikibu shū 紫式部集

        • Poetry collection of Murasaki Shikibu.
        • Sieffert, René. Murasaki Shikibu: Poèmes. Paris: Publications Orientalistes de France, 1978.
        • Mutsuwaki 陸奥話記

        • “Tales and Records of Mutsu” (Keene, Seeds, 615). Account of Minamoto no Yoriyoshi’s campaign against rebels in northern Japan (1051-1062).
        • McCullough, Helen Craig. “A Tale of Mutsu.” HJAS 25 (1964-1965): 178-211.
        • A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – M – N – O – R – S – T – U – W – Y – Z [return to top]

          Nakatsukasa naishi no nikki 中務内侍日記

        • Ikegami, Pamela B. Nakatsukasa Naishi Nikki : literary conventions in the memoirs of a thirteenth century court lady. M.A. thesis, University of Hawaii at Manao. 1994. 134 p. [“Includes an annotated translation of the work”] [worldcat]
        • Naruto chūjō monogatari 鳴門中将物語

          • “The Captain of Naruto” trans. by Charles E. Hamilton in Keene, Anthology of Japanese Literature … to the 19th Century, 224-228
          • e-text ed. Kikuchi Shin’ichi from Kōchū Nihon bungaku taikei, vol. 19, Otogizōshi
          • e-text at j-texts.com from Kōchū Nihon bungaku taikei, vol. 19, Otogizōshi

          Neko no sōshi

        • tr. as “Katzenbüchlein” by Naumann, Zauberschale, 1973, 316-322
        • Nezumi no sōshi 鼠の草子

        • Mills, Douglas E. “The Tale of the Mouse. Nezumi no sōshi. MN 34: 2 (1979), 155-168.
        • Note that there are several different tales by this name. Mills translates the “beppon” Nezumi no sōshi, also known as “Nezumi no gon no kami” from a text in Cambridge University Library, ed. in Kokubungaku kenkyūshiryōkan kiyō 5  (March 1979). 
        • A different tale by this name is found in three variant lines, with manuscripts in the Tenri library, Tokyo Hakubutsukan, Suntory Collection, Spencer Collection. The Suntory version is edited in the NKBZ 36 (Otogizōshishū) with modern Japanese translation. Reproductions of the Spencer Collection version can be found in Zaigai Naraehon. For further information, see Kanda Tatsumi and Nishizawa Masashi, Chūsei Ōchōmonogatari Otogi zōshi jiten (Benseishuppan 2002), p. 862-63,  p. 964.
        • Nihon kiryaku 日本記略

        • history in 34 vols. Author unknown, late Heian.
        • Tr. by Bruno Lewin (1962) in: Hammitzsch, Horst (ed.), Rikkokushi. Die amtlichen Reichsannalen Japans (MOAG vol. 43), p. 292-326, 361-378, 425-453.
        • Nihon kōki 日本後紀 (840)

        • 3rd national history covering years 791-833.
        • Lewin, Bruno. “Die Regierungsannalen des Kammu-tennō. Shoku-Nihongi 36-40 und Nihon-kōki 1-13 (780-806)” in Hammitzsch, Horst (ed), Rikkokushi, 1962, p. 327-360, 379-424, 454-547.
        • e-text ed. Koizuka (Nihon kodai reshishi home page)
        • Nihon montoku tennō jitsuroku / Montoku jitsuroku 日本文徳天皇実録

        • 5th national history, covering years 850-858 (reign of Montoku)
        • Shimizu, Osamu. “Nihon Montoku Tennō jitsuroku: An annotated translation, with a survey of the early ninth century in Japan.” Ph.D. dissertation. Columbia University, 1951.
        • Nihon ryōiki 日本霊異記

        • “Accounts of Miracles in Japan.” Ninth-century collection of Buddhist tales compiled by Keikai 景戒 (also read Kyōkai).
        • Shirane, TJL (2007), 117–126. Introduction and four tales (1:3, 2:3, 2:12, 3:26), adapted from Nakamura’s translation.
        • Nakamura, Kyoko Motomochi. Miraculous Stories from the Japanese Buddhist Tradition: The Nihon Ryōiki of the Monk Kyōkai. Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series Volume 20. Cambridge: Harvard Universary Press, 1973. REV: Ury, MN 28 (1973). [Reprinted by Curzon Press, 1997.]
        • Dykstra, Yoshiko. “A study of the Nihonkoku genpō zen-aku ryōiki.” Ph.D. dissertation. University of California, Los Angeles, 1974.
        • Selections tr. in Naumann, Zauberschale, 1973, 33-42. [7 tales: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.7, 1.10, 2.8, 2.33]
        • Bohner, Hermann. “Legenden aus der Frühzeit des japanischen Buddhismus.  Nippon-Koku-gembō-zenaku-ryō-i-ki.” MOAG (1937).
        • Nihon sandai jitsuroku 日本三代実録

        • Last of the six national histories (rikkokushi), covering years 858-887, the reigns of Seiwa, Yōzai and Kōkō.
        • Nihon shoki (Nihongi) 日本書紀

        • Shirane, TJL (2007), 33–49 [“Ukemochi” and “The Empress and Her Brother Prince Sahobiko,” adapted from Aston’s translation].
        • Cranston A Waka Anthology: Volume One. 1993. [poetry]
        • Borgen, Robert, and Marian Ury. “Readable Japanese Mythology: Selections from Kojiki and Nihonshoki.” JATJ 24.1 (1991), 61-97.
        • Florenz, Karl. Japanische Annalen, A.D. 592-697: Nihongi von Suikō-Tennō bis Jitō-Tennō. [Annalen for short] M.O.A.G. 1892-7; 1903. [books 22-30]
        • Florenz, Karl. Japanische Mythologie. MOAG, 1901. [books 1+2]
        • Florenz, Karl. Quellen… Göttingen: Vandenhoeck und Ruprecht, 1919. [books 1-3 + all passages related to religion from all other books]
        • Aston, William. Nihongi, Chronicles of Japan from the earliest times to A.D. 697. London: Japan Society of London, 1886. Often reprinted (Tuttle, 1972). REV Cooper, MN 27 (1972).
        • trans. of “Urashima” (from Tango fudoki) in Tyler, Tales, #106
        • Nijūichidaishū 二十一代集

        • see individual entries here for 21 imperial anthologies (-wakashū omitted): 1 Kokin 古今和歌集/ 2 Gosen 後撰和歌集/ 3 Shūi 拾遺和歌集/ 4 Goshūi 後拾遺和歌集/ 5 Kin’yō 金葉和歌集/ 6 Shika 詞花和歌集/ 7 Senzai 千載和歌集/ 8 Shinkokin 新古今和歌集/ 9 Shinchoku 新勅撰和歌集/ 10 Shokugosen 続後撰和歌集/ 11 Shokukokin 続古今和歌集/ 12 Shokushūi 続拾遺和歌集/ 13 Shingosen 新後撰和歌集/ 14 Gyokuyō 玉葉和歌集/ 15 Shokusenzai 続千載和歌集/ 16 Shokugoshūi 続後拾遺和歌集/ 17 Fuga 風雅和歌集/ 18 Shinsenzai 新千載和歌集/ 19 Shinshūi 新拾遺和歌集/ 20 Shingoshūi 新後拾遺和歌集/ 21 Shinshokukokin 新続古今和歌集
        • online search of Nijūichidaishū database at NIJL.
        • NIJL (Kokubungaku kenkyū shiryōkan) released CD-ROM of anthologies in 1999.
        • Nittō guhō junrei gyōki 入唐求法巡禮記

        • Diary of Ennin 円仁 (794-864). “Travel Diary of a Pilgrimage to Chinese in Search of the Law”
        • Reischauer, Edwin O. Ennin’s diary: the record of a pilgrimage to China in search of the law. New York: Ronald Press, 1955. 454 p.
        • Noh plays (yōkyoku genre) 謡曲

        • Noh plays have not been listed separately in this list, as a detailed bibliography has been prepared elsewhere on this site (trans-noh). Major anthologies only listed below. The number of noh plays translated is given in square brackets. 
        • Smethurst, Mae J. Dramatic Representations of Filial Piety: Five Noh in Translation. Cornell, 1998. [5]
        • Brazell, Karen. Traditional Japanese Theater: An Anthology of Plays: Columbia UP, 1998. [7]
        • Shimazaki, Chifumi. Troubled Souls from Japanese Noh Plays of the Fourth Group. Cornell, 1998. [6] // Restless Spirits from Japanese Noh Plays of the Fourth Group. Cornell, 1995. [4] // Warrior Ghost Plays from the Japanese Noh Theater. Cornell, 1993. [6]
        • Godel, Armen, and Koichi Kano. La Lande des Mortifications: Vingt-cinq pieces de nō. Paris: Gallimard. 1994. [25]
        • Teele, Roy E., Nicholas J. Teele, and H. Rebecca Teele. Ono no Komachi: Poems, Stories, Nō Plays. New York & London: Garland Publishing, 1993. O.P. [6]
        • Tyler, Royall. Japanese Nō Dramas. Penguin, 1992. [24]
        • Goff, Janet. Noh drama and The Tale of Genji. Princeton UP, 1991. O.P. [15]
        • Yasuda, Kenneth. Masterworks of the Noh Theater. Indiana UP, 1989. O.P. [17]
        • Brazell, Karen, ed. Twelve Plays of the Noh and Kyōgen Theaters. Ithaca, 1988. [9]
        • Shimazaki, Chifumi. God Noh. Tokyo: Hinoki Shoten, 1971 // The Noh, Volume 2: Battle Noh in Parallel Translations with an Introduction and Running Commentaries. Tokyo: Hinoki Shoten, 1987. // The Noh, Volume III: Woman Noh Book 1 and 2. Tokyo: Hinoki Shoten, 1987. // Warrior ghost plays from the Japanese Noh theater. Cornell, 1993. //  Restless Spirits from Japanese Noh Plays of the Fourth Group. Cornell, 1994. // Troubled Souls from Japanese Noh Plays of the Fourth Group. Cornell, 1998.
        • Sieffert, René. No et Kyōgen. 2 vols. Paris: P.O.F., 1979. [50]
        • Tyler, Royall. Pining Wind. A cycle of Nō Plays. Cornell, 1978. [8]
        • Tyler, Royall. Granny Mountains: A Second Cycle of Nō Plays Cornell, 1978. [7]
        • Keene, Donald, ed. Twenty Plays of the Nō Theatre. Columbia UP, 1970. [20]
        • Sieffert, René. La tradition secrete du Nō. Paris: Gallimard, 1960. [5]
        • Nippon Gakujutsu Shinkokai. The Noh Drama. Ten plays from the Japanese. Tokyo, 1955. [10]
        • Peri, Noel. Cinq Nō. Paris, 1921. [4]
        • Hare, Thomas Blenman. Zeami’s Style: The Noh Plays of Zeami Motokiyo. Stanford UP, 1986.
        • Norito 祝詞

        • Norito (“prayers to the gods”).
        • Philippi’s translation of “Great Exorcism of the Last Day of the Sixth Month” (Minazuki tsugomori no ōharae) is reprinted in Shirane, TJL (2007), 57–60.
        • Philippi, Donald L. Norito: A Translation of the Ancient Japanese Ritual Prayers. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1990. [Translation of 27 official rituals found in vol. 8 of the Engi-shiki, two from Nihon shoki, one from Kojiki, one from Hitachi Fudoki, and one from Fujiwara no Yorinaga’s twelfth-century diary Taiki. Translation originally published in 1959.] REV: Norman Havens, JJRS 19/5 (1992) online
        • Bock, Felicia. Engi-shiki: Procedures of the Engi Era, Books VI-X. Tokyo: Sophia University, 1972. REV: Wilbur M. Fridell, JJRS 4/4 (1977) online.
        • Ancient Japanese rituals by Ernest Satow, Karl Florenz, 1927 (Asiatic Society of Japan, reprints vol. 2). [From First Series Vol. 3, 7, 9, 27]
        • A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – M – N – O – R – S – T – U – W – Y – Z [return to top]

          Ochikubo monogatari 落窪物語

        • “The Tale of Ochikubo.” Late 10th century? Author unknown. Traditionally attributed to Minamoto no Shitagō (911-983). Overview: Keene, Seeds, 446-451.
        • Maurizi, Andrea. Storia di Ochikubo. Venice: Marsilio, 1992.
        • Mauclaire, Simone. Un Cendrillon japonais du Xe siècle. Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose, 1984.
        • Langemann, C. and V. Werner. Die Geschichte der Ehrenwerten Ochikubo: Ochikubo Monogatari. Zurich: Manesse, 1994. [German translation from NKBT (1857) and SNKBT (1989) editions.]
        • Whitehouse, Wilfrid, and Eizo Yanagisawa. Ochikubo monogatari: A Tenth-Century Japanese Novel. London: Peter Owen, 1934. [Later reprints.]
        • Ogura hyakunin isshu 小倉百人一首 → see Hyakunin isshu

          Ōgi-shō 奥義抄

        • Poetry manual written between 1124-44 by Fujiwara no Kiyosuke 藤原清輔 (1104-1177).
        • Excerpts tr. in David T. Bialock, “Voice, Text, and the Question of Poetic Borrowing in Late Classical Japanese Poetry,” HJAS 54. 1. (June, 1994), 185, 188-89.
        • Discussed with short excerpt in French tr. in Pigeot, Michiyukibun, 1982, pp. 131-5.
        • Ōigawa gyōkō waka no jo 大井川行幸和歌序

        • Ceadel, E. B. “Tadamine’s preface to the Oi river poems.” Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London (1956): 331-343. // “The Ōi River Poems and Preface.” Asia Major 3.1 (1953): 65-106.
        • Utaawase composed in 907 by six poets on imperial visit to river by Emperor Uda [NKBD 224f]
        • Ojima no kuchizusami []

          • “Reciting Poetry to Myself at Ojima.” Account of journey to Mino province in 1353 by Nijō Yoshimoto 二条良基 (1320-1388).
          • Keene, Seeds, 1993, 974-76. [Excerpt in tr.]

          Ōjōyōshū (Ōjō Yōshū) 往生要集

        • “The Essentials of Salvation” (985) by Genshin 源信.
        • Andrews, Allan A. The teachings essential for rebirth: a study of Genshin’s Ōjōyōshū.  Monumenta Nipponica monograph. Sophia University, 1973.
        • Reischauer, A. K. “Genshin’s Ōjōyōshū.” TASJ second series, 1930.
        • e-text ed. M. Toshima (西南院本仮名書き往生要集) 
        • Ōkagami 大鏡

        • “The Great Mirror.” Historical account of years 850-1025, focussing on Fujiwara no Michinaga.
        • Diakonovoi, Eleny Mikhailovny. Okagami: velikoe zertsalo. 2000. (Russian). Webcat
        • McCullough, Helen C. Ōkagami: The Great Mirror. Fujiwara Michinaga (966-1027) and His Times. Princeton and Tokyo: Princeton UP and University of Tokyo Press, 1980. [pbk. reprint, Michigan, 1991. U.S. only]
        • Yamagiwa, Joseph K. The Ōkagami. London: George Allen and Unwin, 1967 [Reprint Tuttle 1977]. First published in Reischauer and Yamagiwa, eds., Translations from Early Japanese literature (Harvard University Press, 1951) [included in first edition only].
        • Ōnin-ki 応仁記 (around 1500)

        • Varley, H. Paul. The Ōnin war, History of its background, with a selective translation of The Chronicle of Ōnin. Columbia University Press, 1967. [pp. 139-190]
        • Ono no Komachi (poems) 小町集

        • Teele, Roy E., Nicholas J. Teele, and H. Rebecca Teele. Ono no Komachi: Poems, Stories, Nō Plays. New York & London: Garland Publishing, 1993. O.P. [“The Poetry of Ono no Komachi,” “The Kokinshū Poems of Ono no Komachi,” pp. 1-25.]
        • Hirshfield, Jane. The Ink Dark Moon. Love Poems by Ono no Komachi and Izumi Shikibu, Women of the Ancient Court of Japan. New York: Vintage Books, 1990. REV: McMullen, TLS (April 7-13, 1989): 370. [*an audio-cassette, now O.P., was made from this translation. A classical Japanese first?]
        • Weber-Schaefer, Peter. Ono no Komachi, Gestalt und Legende im Nō Spiel. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 1960.
        • Onzōshi shimawatari 御曹子島渡り

        • Muromachi tale, see NKBD 295
        • Kubota, Yoko. “Un itinerario nel fantastico: l’Onzōshi shimawatari.Il Giappone 25 (1985): 35-66. Reprinted as “Viaggio dell’Onzōshi alle isole” in Strippoli, La monaca tuttofare, 2001, 61-70.
        • tr. as “Yoshitsune’s Voyage Among the Islands” in D. E. Mills, “Medieval Japanese Tales Part II,” Folklore 84 (1973): 58-74.
        • otogizōshi [genre] 御伽草紙

        • [Some also listed separately by title. See also bibliography by Roberta Strippoli.]
        • The term otogizōshi comes from Otogi bunko, the title of a collection of 23 tales published after 1700 in Osaka, but the term is also used in a wider sense to refer to a corpus of several hundred Muromachi tales. For an overview see Cheiko Irie Mulhern, “Otogi-zōshi. Short Stories of the Muromachi Period,” MN 29.2 (1974), 181-198.
        • Glassman, Hank. “The Tale of Mokuren: A Translation of Mokuren no sōshi” in Buddhist Literature 1 (1999), pp. 120-161. [目連の草子]
        • Sieffert, René. Le Livre des contes. Paris: P.O.F., 1993. p. 96. [Urihime, Isshunbōshi, Urashima Tarō, Karoito]
        • Pigeot, Jacqueline, and Kosugi Keiko, Voyages en d’autres Mondes: Récits japonaise du xvieme siècle. Paris: Editions Philippe Picquier/Bibliotheque Nationale, 1993. *Annoted tr. of Urashima Tarō, Sumiyoshi no honji (extracts), Hōrai-san (extracts), Kibune, Tanabata. REV: Karen Brock, JJS 21.2 (1995), 529-33. // Royall Tyler, MN 49.2 (1994), 240-241.
        • Mulhern, Chieko Irie. “Cinderella and the Jesuits: An Otogizōshi Cycle as Christian Literature.” MN 34.4 (1979): 409-447. // “Analysis of Cinderella Motifs, Italian and Japanese.” Asian Folklore Studies 44.1 (1985), 1-37. // “Otogi-zōshi: Short Stories of the Muromachi Period.” MN 29.2 (1974): 181-198.
        • Skord, Virginia. Tales of Tears and Laughter: Short Fiction of Medieval Japan. Honolulu: Hawaii University Press, 1991. [“A Discretionary Tale (Otonashi sōshi), “The Cat’s Tale (Neko no sōshi), “Old Lady Tokiwa” (Tokiwa no uba), “The Mirror Man” (Kagami otoko emaki); “A Tale of Brief Slumbers” (Utatane no sōshi), “The Tale of Ikago” (Ikago monogatari), “The Tale of the Brazier” (Hioke no sōshi), “The Little Man” (Ko otoko no sōshi), “The Tale of Dōjōji” (Dōjōji monogatari), “The King of Farts” (Fukutomi chōja monogatari), “A Tale of Two Nursemaids” (Menoto no sōshi), “Lazy Tarō” (Monogusa Tarō), “The Errand Woman” (Oyō no ama)] // “The Comic Consciousness in Medieval Japanese Narrative: Otogi-zōshi of Commoners.” Ph.D. diss., Cornell Univ., 1987. // “From Rags to Riches and Beyond: Monogusa Tarō.” MN 42.2 (1989), 171-198. // Virginia Skord Waters, “Sex, Lies, and the Illustrated Scroll: The Dōjōji Engi Emaki.” MN 52.1 (1997), 59-84.
        • McCullough, Helen Craig. Classical Japanese Prose, 1990, pp. 495-509: “Little One-Inch” (Isshunbōshi) and “Akimichi”
        • Childs, Margaret H. “Chigo monogatari: Love Stories or Buddhist Sermons?” MN 35.2 (1987). // “The influence of the Buddhist practice of sange on literary form: revelatory tales.” Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 14.1 (1987), 53-66. [PDF]
        • Kavanaugh, Frederick. “Twenty Representative Muromachi Period Prose Narratives: An Analytic Study.” PhD. diss., University of Hawaii, 1985.
        • Pigeot, Jacqueline, and Keiko Kosugi. Le chrysanthème solitaire (Hitomotogiku). Paris: Bibliothèque Nationale, Département des manuscrits, Division des manuscrits orientaux, 1984. REV: Jacques Besineau, MN 40.4 (1985). 
        • Araki, James T. Otogi-zoshi and Nara-ehon: A Field of Study in Flux.” MN 36: 1 (1981), 1-20. 
        • Steven, Chigusa. “Hachikazuki. A Muromachi Short Story. MN 32.3 (1977), 303-331. [Title tr. as “The Bowl Girl.”] 
        • Mills, D. E. “Medieval Japanese Tales Part I.” Folklore 83 (1972): 287-301 // “Medieval Japanese Tales Part II.” Folklore 84 (1973): 58-74. [Later contains tr. of Onzōshi shimawatari]
        • Ruch, Barbara. “‘Otogi-bunko’ and Short Stories of the Muromachi Period.” Ph.D. diss., Columbia University, 1965.
        • e-text ed. M. Shibata under prep. (KNBT)
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          Rakuyōshū 落葉集

          • A “Japanese dictionary in three parts […] published in Nagasaki by the Jesuit Mission Press in 1598.” [Bailey 1961: 289.]
          • Bailey, Don Clifford. “The Rakuyōshū.” MN 16: 3/4 (Oct., 1960 – Jan., 1961), 289-376. [Excerpts tr. include, for example, “The 651 Words in the Main Text of the Rakuyōshū Beginning with the Syllable Ka,” pp. 329-58.]
          • Yamagiwa, Joseph K. “Revisions in the Rakuyōshū at the Time of its Printing in 1598.” MN 11: 2 (1955), PAGES.

          renga 連歌 (genre)

          • Genre of “linked verse.”
          • Translations listed here include: Anegakōji Imashinmei hyakuin, Minase sangin hyakuninYuyama sangin hyakunin [Add other links]
          • Studies include: Earl Miner, Japanese linked poetry: an account with translations of renga and haikai sequences (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1979); Steven D. Carter, “A Lesson in Failure: Linked-Verse Contests in Medieval Japan,” Journal of the American Oriental Society 104.4 (1984), 727-737; Steven D. Carter, The Road to Komatsubara: A Classical Reading of the Renga Hyakunin (Cambridge: Council on East Asian Studies, Harvard University, 1987);  Esperanza Ramirez-Christensen, Heart’s flower: the life and poetry of Shinkei (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1994); H. Mack Horton, Song in an Age of Discord: The Journal of Sōchō and Poetic Life in Medieval Japan (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2002). For a longer list, see “Bibliography of Japanese Literature in English”(Columbia University), under “Renga” [PDF].

          Renga shinshiki tsuika narabi ni Shinshiki kin’an tō 連歌新式追加並新式今案等

            • Renga rulebook compiled in 1501 by Shōhaku 松柏 (1443-1527).
            • Carter, Steven D. “Rules, Rules, and More Rules: Shōhaku’s Renga Rulebook of 1501.” HJAS 43.2 (Dec., 1983), 581-642. [Title rendered literally as”The New Rules of Linked Verse, With Additions, Suggestions for a New Day, and Other Comments” (p. 83). Translation from p. 595-631 is titled “The New Rules of Linked Verse with Kanera’s Suggestions or a New Day and Additional Comments by Shōhaku” with last four words in smaller font size. The translation is followed by a detailed English-Japanese glossary, pp. 651-42.]

              Rikkoku-shi 六国史

            • Six national histories (Nara, early Heian): (1) Nihon shoki (2) Shoku nihongi (3) Nihon koki (4) Shoku nihon kōki (5) Nihon montoku Tennō jitsuroku (6) Nihon sandai jitsuroku
            • rōei [genre of songs] 朗詠

            • Harich-Schneider, Eta. Rōei: The Medieval Court Songs of Japan. Monumenta Nipponica Monographs No. 21. Tokyo: Sophia University Press, 1965.
            • Harich-Schneider, Eta. “Rōei: The Medieval Court Songs of Japan.” MN 13.3/4 (1957), 183-222; [Continued], MN 14.1/2 (1958), 91-118; [Continued], MN 14.3/4 (1958), 319-355; [Continued], MN 15.3/5 (1950), 419-424
            • Rokurin ichiro no ki 六輪一露之記

            • A Record of the Six Rings and the One Word” [PCCJL 188] by noh playwright and theorist Komparu Zenchiku (金春禅竹)
            • Nearman, Mark J. “The Visions of a Creative Artist: Zenchiku’s Rokurin Ichiro Treatises.”
              MN 50: 2 (1995), 235-62, 50: 3, 281-304, 50: 4, 485-522, 51: 1 (1996), 17-52.
            • Thornhill, Arthur H., III. Six Circles, one Dewdrop. Princeton UP, 1993.
            • Ryōjin hishō 梁塵秘抄

            • “Secret Selection of Dust on the Beams” (c. 1170).  Collection of poems and songs compiled by Emperor Go-Shirakawa.
            • Kwon, Yung-Hee. Songs to Make the Dust Dance: The Ryōjin hishō of Twelfth-Century Japan. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994. [Based on Ph.D. Cornell 1984]
            • Kwon, Yung-Hee. “Voices from the Periphery: Love Songs in Ryōjin hishō.” 41: 1 (1986), 1-20. // “The Emperor’s Songs: Go-Shirakawa and Ryōjin hishō Kudenshū. MN 41: 3 (1986), 261-98.
            • Moriguchi, Yasuhiko, and David Jenkins. The Dance of the Dust on the Rafters: Selections from Ryōjin-hishō. Seattle: Broken Moon Press, 1990.
            • 32 songs tr. Sato in Sato and Watson 1981:157-62.
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              Sagoromo monogatari 狭衣物語

            • “The Tale of Sagoromo.”
            • Okada, Richard. “Sagoromo monogatari : a study and partial translation.” M.A. thesis, Berkeley 1977. Includes translation of parts of the Asukai no Kimi storyline from book one. [n.s.]
            • D’Etcheverry, Charo B. “Out of the Mouths of Nurses: The Tale of Sagoromo and Midranks Romance.” MN 59:2 (2004), 153-177.
            • e-text ed. H. Shinozaki from Yūhōdō bunko ed. 1925.
            • saibara genre 催馬楽

            • The “name of a certain type of Japanese song which has been preserved in the Imperial court music, called gagaku” (Harich-Schneider). 
            • Many are quoted or referred to by characters in Heian fiction. Four chapter titles of Genji monogatari are derived from names of saibara, Agemaki (ch. 47), Azumay (50), Takekawa (44), Umegae (32). In total, there are references to some twenty saibara, cited here by number of the chapter, and page, and footnote (“n”) in the translation by Royall Tyler (The Tale of Genji, 2001). See underlined references for translations.
            • “Agemaki” 総角 (“Trefoil Knots”): 872n5, (ch. 47 Agemaki)
            • “Ana Tōto” あな尊/安名尊 (“Ah, Wondrous Day”): 443 (ch. 23 Hatsune)
            • “Aoyanagi” 青柳 (“Green Willow”): 443, 591n42 (ch. 24 Kochō, 34 Wakana I)
            • “Ashigaki”葦垣 (“Fence of Rushes”): 564n13 (ch. 33 Fujiuraba)
            • “Asukai” 飛鳥井: ch. 2/30n26, 12/25n82 (ch. 2 Hahakigi, 12 Suma)
            • “Azumaya” 東屋 (“The Eastern Cottage”): 147n39, 310n19, 1001n42, 2004n51 (ch. 7 Momiji no ga, 15 Yomogiu, 50 Azumya)
            • “Hitachi” 常陸: ch. 5/105n77 (tr). *a fūzoku uta, or folk song
            • “Imo to are” 妹と我 (“My love and I”):  701n15 (ch. 37 Takekawa)
            • “Ise no Umi” 伊勢海 (“Sea of Umi”): 264n20 (ch. 13 Akashi)
            • “Ishikawa” 石川: ch. 7/149n46,  160n26 (ch. 8 Hana no en)
            • “Katsuraki” 葛城 (“Katsuraki”): 643 (ch. 35 Wakana II)
            • “Kawaguchi” 河口: 64n13 (ch. 33 Fujiuraba)
            • “Kono Tono wa” 此殿は (“This Lord of Ours”/”This Gentleman”): 435n19, 924n24 (ch. 23 Hatsune, 48 Sawarabi)
            • “Koromogae” 更衣: 387n34 (ch. 21 Otome)
            • “Nukigawa” 貫河 (“Nuki River”): 159n21, 469n11, n12, 470n15 (ch. 8 Hana no en, 26 Tokonatsu)
            • “Sakurabito” 桜人 (“O cherry blossom man”): 351n10 (ch. 19 Usugumo)
            • “Sono Koma” 其駒 (“That Horse of Mine”): 343n34 (ch. 18 Matsukaze)
            • “Takasago” 高砂: 216n91 (ch. 10 Sakaki)
            • “Takekawa” (“Bamboo River”): 438, 809n14, (ch. 23 Hatsune, 44 Takekawa) 
            • “Umegae” 梅枝 (“The Plum Tree Branch”): 550n18 (ch. 32 Umegae)
            • “Wagaie” 我家 ([My home]): 38n59, 469n11, n12 (ch. 2 Hahakigi, 26 Tokonatsu)
            • “Yamashiro” 山城 (about “melon grower”): 105n77 (ch. 5 Wakamurasaki)
            • Markham, Elizabeth. Saibara: Japanese Court Songs of the Heian Period. 2 vols. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1983. 
            • Sato in Sato and Watson 1981, 152-3 (nine songs).
            • Sieffert, René. Chants de palefreniers. Saibara. Paris: 1976. [Paris: P.O.F., 1992]. 93 p.
            • Harich-Schneider, Eta. “Koromogae. One of the Saibara of Japanese Court Music.” MN 8.1/2 (1952), 398-406. [更衣]
            • Saigyō monogatari 西行物語 (Muromachi tale)

            • McKinney, Meredith. The Tale of Saigyō (Saigyō Monogatari). Michigan Papers in Japanese Studies, Number 25. Ann Arbor, 1998.
            • Heldt, Gustav, tr. “Saigyō’s Traveling Tale: A Translation of Saigyō Monogatari.” MN 52: 4 (1997), 467-521.
            • Sieffert, René. La legende de Saigyō. Paris, P.O.F., 1996. 95 p.
            • e-text ed. H. Shinozaki (GSRJ)
            • Saiyōshō 才葉抄

              • Late twelfth-century treatise of calligraphy, “based on the teachings of Fujiwara Norinaga 藤原教長, 1109-80, as importated to Fujiwara Koretsune 藤原伊経, d. 1227” (DeCoker 1988: 197).
              • DeCoker, Gary. “Secret Teachings in Medieval Calligraphy: Jubokushō and Saiyōshō.” MN 43.2 (Summer, 1988), 197-228. [Continuation:] MN 43.3. (Autumn, 1988), 259-278. [Translation of Saiyōshō in second article.]
              • See also entry for the earlier treatise Yakaku Teikinshō 夜鶴庭訓抄.

              sakimori uta [sakimori no uta] 防人歌

            • Poetic genre. “Poems of the frontier guards” (PCCJL, p. 295), or “border guard poems.” Collected in books 19-20 of Man’yōshū.
            • Sakuteiki『作庭記』

            • “Records of Garden Making” by Tachibana no Toshitsuna 藤原良経 (1169-1206).
            • Takei, Jirō, and Marc P. Keane. Sakuteiki: visions of the Japanese garden: a modern translation of Japan’s gardening classic. Tokyo: Tuttle, 2001.
            • Vieillard-Baron, Michel. De la creation des jardins: traduction du Sakutei-ki. Texte presenté, traduit et annoté par Michel Vieillard-Baron. 2nd edition. Tokyo: Maison franco-japonaise, 2003. 93 p.
            • Di Felice, Paola. Sakuteiki: annotazioni sulla composizione dei giardini, a cura di Paola Di Felice; prefazione e foto di Fosco Maraini. Saggi; 26. Firenze: Le Lettere, 2001. 274 p.
            • Rambach, Pierre, and Suzanne Rambach. Sakutei-ki: ou, Le livre secret des jardins japonais: version integrale d’un manuscrit inedit de la fin du 12e siècle. Commentaires et digressions autour d’un recueil de secrets à l’usage des maîtres de jardins par Pierre et Suzanne Rambach; d’apres un trad. orale de Tomoya Masuda. Genève: Albert Skira, 1973
            • Sanbōe 三宝絵

            • “Illustrations of the three jewels.” Compiled in 984 by Minamoto Tamenori 源為憲 (941-1011).
            • Kamens, Edward. The Three Jewels: A Study and Translation of Minamoto Tamenori’s Sanbōe. Michigan Monograph Series in Japanese Studies No. 2. Ann Arbor: Center for Japanese Studies, The University of Michigan, 1988. // REV:  Marian Ury, MN 44.4 (1989). More reviews (JSTOR).

            • San Tendai godaisan ki 参天台五台山記

              • “Diary of Pilgrimages to Mt. Tiantai and Wutai.” Account of experiences in Sung China by Jōjin Ajari 成尋阿闍梨 (1011-1081).
              • Borgen, Robert. “The Case of the Plagiaristic Journal: A Curious Passage from Jōjin’s Diary.” In New Leaves, ed. Aileen Gatten and Anthony H. Chambers. University of Michigan, 1993. // “Japanese Nationalism: Ancient and Modern.” Annual Report of the Institute for International Studies [Meiji Gakuin University], no. 1 (December 1998), 49-59. [online]
              • Verschuer, Charlotte von. “Le voyage de Jōjin au mont Tiantai.” T’oung Pao 77 (1991), 1-48. // “Jōjin découvre la ville de Hangzhou en 1072.” In Le vase de béryl, ed. J. Pigeot, H. Rotermund. Paris: Phillipe Piquier, 1997. [These articles contain translations of “a few sections” (Vershuer 2002).] //  “Looking from within and without: Ancient and Medieval External Relations,” MN 55: 4 (Winter, 2000), 537-566. [Overview of translations, kakikudashi versions, and studies, see pp. 551-52.]
              • Account of “rain-making” in 1073. Partial trans. by Arthur Waley in Edward Conze, et al., Buddhist Texts Through the Ages (Oxford: B. Cassirer, 1954), 303-306.
              • Text online, with full text search (Zhejiang 浙江 University).

              Sanjūrokuninsen 三十六人撰

            • “Poems of the Thirty-six Immortals”
            • Tahara, Mildred. “The Selected Poems of the Thirty-six Immortal Poets of Fujiwara Kintō,” in Heinrich, Currents, 1997, 459-480.
            • e-text (site ed. 水垣久)
            • Sankaiki 山槐記

            • Diary by Nakayama Tadachika 内大臣中山忠親 (1130-1195).
            • Print edition: 増補史料大成『山槐記』(臨川書店)
            • Database: Rekihaku (registration required).
            • Sanka shū 山家集

            • Poetry collection by Saigyō 西行 (1118-1190).
            • Soletta, Luigi. I canti dell’eremo. Milano: Edizioni La Via Felice, 1998. 156 p. With romanized text. [n.s.]
            • Collet, Hervé. Saigyō: poèmes de ma hutte de montagne. Millemont, France: Moundarren, 1992. 98 p. [n.s.]
            • Watson, Burton. Saigyō. Poems of a Mountain Home. New York: Columbia UP, 1991.
            • Markova., Vera N. Gornaia khizhina, 1979. 125 p. [Russian translation, n.s.]
            • LaFleur, William R. Mirror for the Moon: A Selection of Poems by Saigyō (1118-1190). New York: A New Directions Book, 1978. O.P.
            • Honda, H. H. The Sanka shū: the mountain hermitage. Tokyo: Hokuseido Press, 1971. REV Mathy, MN 27 (1972).
            • manuscript online (Ishikawa Pref. library)
            • e-text at Kotenmura. Digital 西行庵 (H. Nitobe)
            • e-text announced:  H. Shinozaki’s Taiju site.
            • Sannin hōshi 三人法師 (Muromachi tale)

            • “The Three Monks” tr. Margaret Childs in Childs,  Rethinking Sorrow, 1991, 73-90.
            • “The Three Priests” tr. Donald Keene in Keene, Anthology, 322-331. [Partial tr.]
            • Drei Einsielder. Sannin Bōshi. Ein Otogi-Sōshi” tr. Kazuhiko Sano. MN 6 (1943), pp. 330-354.
            • Sanuki no suke nikki 讃岐典侍日記

            • “The Sanuki no Suke Diary” by Fujiwara no Nagako (1079 – c. 1120) (Keene, Seeds, 394).
            • Brewster, Jennifer, trans. The Emperor Horikawa Diary by Fujiwara no Nagako, Sanuki no Suke Nikki. Honolulu: The University Press of Hawaii, 1977. 155 pp.
            • Sarashina nikki 更級日記

            • “The Sarashina Diary” by Sugawara no Takasue no musume 菅原孝標女 (1008-?).
            • Negri, Carolina. Le memorie della dama di Sarashina. Venezia: Marsilio 2005. 136 p.
            • Vos, Frits. Als dauw op alsembladeren: het levensverhaal van een Japanse vrouw uit de elfde eeuw Amsterdam: Meulenhoff, 1988. 255 p.
            • Sieffert, René. Le journal de Sarashina. Paris: P.O.F., 1978. p. 107.
            • Selections in German in Naumann, Zauberschale, 1973, 135-144. [Selections tr. as “Die Tochter des Sugawara Takasue: Sarashina-Tagebuch.”]
            • Morris, Ivan. As I Crossed a Bridge of Dreams: Recollections of a Woman in Eleventh-Century Japan. New York: Dial Press, 1971. [Reprint: Penguin Classics.]
            • Kemper, Ulrich, trans., Horst Hammitzsch, ed. Sarashina Nikki: Tagebuch einer Japanischen Hofdame aus dem Jahre 1060. Stuttgart: Reclam, 1966.
            • Ōmori and Doi, Diaries of Court Ladies of Old Japan, 1920. With an introduction by Amy Lowell. Often reprinted. Note that some European translations are based on this very dated translation (e.g. Journaux des dames de cour du Japon ancien. Arles: P. Picquier, 1998). Online version at U. Penn.
            • e-text ed. M. Shibata (Yumeido bunko); e-text ed. Issei; e-text ed. A. Okajima
            • e-text of Musashino shoin edition (Aozora bunko site)
            • Saru genji zōshi 猿源氏草紙

            • Muromachi tale. NKBD 805.
            • Putzar, Edward D. “The Tale of Monkey Genji. Sarugenji-zōshi.” MN 18.1-4 (1963), 286-312. 
            • “Das Buchlein vom Possenreisser-Genji” in Naumann, Zauberschale, 1973, 303-316.
            • Sasamegoto 私語(ささめごと)

            • Treatise written 1463 by renga poet Shinkei 心敬 (1406-1475). 
            • Title sometimes trans. as “Murmured conversations.”
            • Hirota, Dennis. “In Practice of the Way: Sasamegoto, an Introduction Book in Linked Verse.” Chanoyu Quarterly 19 (1977): 23-46 [“incorporating about half of the treatise’s 62 sections” according to Esperanza Ramirez-Christensen, who is working on a complete translation and study. Heart’s Flower, 1994, p. 8].
            • Royston, Clifton Wilson. “The Poetry and Criticism of Fujiwara Shunzei.” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Michigan, 1974. [n.s.] [ Tr. of excerpt quoted in Bialock 1994, 207.]
            • Sasayaki Take [Sasayaki dake] ささやき竹 (Muromachi tale)

            • Kavanagh, Frederick G. “An Errant Priest: Sasayaki Take, The Whispering Bamboo.” MN 51: 2 (1996), 219-244. 
            • facsimile of ehon. NIJL.
            • Sazareishi さざれいし

            • Daniels, F.J. “Otogi-Zoosi--one story: Sazareisi” tr. as “Pebble” in Daniels, Selections from Japanese Literature, 1953: 43-51, 142-5.
            • e-text by H. Shinozaki from Kōchū Nihon Bungaku Taikei 19 (1925).
            • Senchaku [hongan nenbutsu] shū 選択本願念仏集

            • Senchakushū English Translation Project. Honen’s Senchakushū: passages on the selection of the nembutsu in the original vow…. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 1998. 280 pp. 
            • Augustine, Morris J. and Kondo Tessho. Senchaku Hongan Nembutsu shū... Berkeley: Numata Center for Buddhist Translation and Research, 1997.170 pp. 
            • Sendai kuji hongi (Kujiki) 先代旧事本紀(旧事紀)

            • “The Original record of Old Matters from Previous Ages” (title tr. in Bentley, Historiographical Trends, 2002, p. 1). Ten-volume work on history and Shinto, author unknown. Now believed to be early Heian.
            • Iori, Joko. “Sendai kuji hongi and the Japanese Mythological Tradition.” Ph.D. diss. (tentative title, work in progress) at Columbia University. [Translation and analysis.]
            • Florenz, Karl. “Japanische Mythologie, Nihongi ‘Zeitalter der Götter’, Nebst Ergänzungen aus anderen alten Quellwerken.” MOAG, 1901. [Excerpts, pp. 275-282.]
            • Senjushō 撰集抄

            • “Selection of Tales.” Anonymous setsuwa collection (121 tales) once thought to be the work of Saigyō.
            • Kawashima, Writing Margins, 2001, pp. 304-5. (Tale 3:3)
            • Smits, Pursuit of Loneliness, 1995, pp. 100-101. (Excerpt.)
            • Keene, Seeds, 1993, 770-773. (Excerpts.)
            • Moore, Jean. “Senjushō: Buddhist Tales of Renunciation.” MN 41: 2 (1986), 127-174.
            • Naumann, Wolfram, “Senjuushoo I/1-6” Oriens Extremus 26.1/2 (1979).
            • Hartwieg-Hiratsuka, Keiko. Saigyōo-Rezeption. Das von Saigyōo verkörperte Eremiten-Ideal in der japanischen Rezeptionsgeschichte. Europäische Hochschulschriften. Frankfurt, 1984.
            • senmyō 宣命

              • Ermakova, L. M. Norito; Semmë. Moscow, 1991. (Russian)
              • Zachert, Herbert. Semmyō: Die kaiserlichen Erlasse des Shoku-Nihongi. [Institut für Orientforschung <Berlin>: Veröffentlichungen; 4] Berlin: Akademie Verlag, 1950. (独)
              • Zachert, Herbert. “Die kaiserliche Erlasse des Shoku Nihongi in Text und Übersetzung mit Erläuterungen. I. Einleitung und Semmyō 1-29” Asia Major 8 (1933), pp. 105-232.(独)
              • Sansom, George B. “The Imperial Edicts in the Shoku Nihongi (700-790)” in TASJ, 2nd series, 1924, pp. 5-39.

              Senzaishū 千載集

            • “Collection of a Thousand Years” (“SZS”). 7th imperial poetic anthology. Commissioned by Retired Emperor Goshirakawa and compiled in 1188 by Fujiwara no Shunzei 藤原俊成 (1114-1204). Contains 1287 poems in 20 vols. 
            • SZS no. 66  sazanami ya / shiga no miyako wa arenishi wo / mukashi nagara no / yamazakura kana (“The capital at Shiga, / Shiga of the rippling waves, / Lies now in ruins: / The mountain cherries / Stay as before.” Bownas and Thwaite, Japanese Verse, 1964, p. 99).  Heike monogatari 7.16  gives an account of how Taira no Tadanori 忠度 begged his poetry master Shunzei to include one of his poems in the collection. After the Genpei War ended, Shunzei selected this poem but for reasons of political expediency he titled it “Poet Unknown.” See also the noh plays Shunzei Tadanori and Tadanori.
            • Brower and Miner, JCP, 1961. [3 poems]
            • e-text (SNBT) at Kotenmura
            • Shasekishū 沙石集

            • “Collection of Sand and Pebbles” by Rinzai monk Mujū Ichien 無住一円 (1226-1312)
            • Tyler, Japanese Tales, 1987. [#7/2, 7/3, 7/17, 7/18, 7/20, 7/24, 8/11]
            • Morrell, Robert E. Sand and Pebbles (Shasekishū): The Tales of Mujū Ichien, A Voice for Pluralism in Kamakura Buddhism. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1985. 383 p. [Some tales presented in summary form.]
            • Morrell, Robert E. “Kamakura accounts of Myōe Shōnin as popular religious hero.” JJRS 9/2-3 (1982), 171–98 (online) [Includes translation of section 3/8, p. 178-181.]
            • Morrell, Robert E. “Tales from the Collection of Sand and Pebbles.” Literature East and West 14 (1970), 251-63. 
            • Morrell, Robert E. “Mujū Ichien’s Shinto-Buddhist Syncretism: Shasekishū, Book 1.” MN 28: 4 (1973), 447-88.
            • Ichien Mujū: Collection de sables et de pierres: Shasekishū, par Ichien Mujū. Traduction, preface et commenaires de Hartmut O. Rotermund. Connaissance de l’Orient, 49. Paris: Gallimard, 1979. 360 p. REV: Roland Schneider in NOAG 127/128 (1980).
            • Golay, Jacqueline. “Le Shasekishū: miroir d’une personnalite, miroir d’une epoque.” PhD diss. University of British Columbia, 1975. 364p.
            • facsimile text online (Kyoto University Library)
            • Shichinin bikuni 七人比丘尼

            • Childs,  Rethinking Sorrow, 1991, 91-140 (“The Seven Nuns”).
            • Though the tale has traditionally included in the kana zōshi genre (the earliest extant text is a printed book from 1635), Childs argues that i should be considered part of the “medieval literary revelatory tale phenomenon” (pp. 27-28).
            • Shikashū [private poetry collections] 私家集

            • Harries, Phillip T. “Personal Poetry Collections: Their Origin and Development Through the Heian Period.” MN 35: 3 (1980), 299-318.
              See extensive online e-text collection of Heian collections by Prof. Shigeta.
            • Shikawakashū / Shikashū 詞花和歌集 .

            • 6th imperial anthology, “Collection of Verbal Flowers,” compiled by Fujiwara no Akisuke in 1151-1154. Abbreviation: SKS.
            • Carter, Traditional Japanese Poetry, 1991. [6 poems]
            • Brower and Miner, JCP, 1961. [2 poems]
            • e-text ed. from Kokka taikan by Japanese Text Initiative
            • Shiki monogatari 四季物語

            • by Kamo no Chōmei 鴨長明. Dated 1360s?
            • Naumann, Wolfram, “Choomeis Erzählungen aus den Vier Jahreszeiten (1-3)” Hoorin 3 (1996), 4 (1997), 5 (1998).
            • Shikishi naishinno shū see Shokushi naishinno shū

              Shinchokusenshū 新勅撰集 

            • “New Imperial Collection” (or “New Royally-Ordered Poetry Collection”). 9th imperial poetic anthology, compiled by Fujiwara no Teika in 1235. Abbreviated “SCSS.”
            • Smits, Ivo. “The Poet and the Politician: Teika and the Compilation of the Shinchokusenshū.” MN 53: 4 (1998), 427-472. +Errata. [MN site notes: “Includes translations of correspondence concerning the Shinchokusenshū: Letter to Kujō Michiie, preface to the Shinchokusenshū, and various exchanges.”]
            • Morrell, Robert E. “Kamakura accounts of Myōe Shōnin as popular religious hero.” JJRS 9/2-3 (1982), 171–98 (online) [Includes translation of poem 629 with headnote, about Myōe, p. 177.]
            • Brower and Miner, JCP, 1961. [2 poems]
            • Shingosenshū (Shingosenwakashū) 新後撰集 (新後撰和歌集 ) (1383-4)

            • “New Later Collection [of Japanese Poems].” 13th imperial poetic anthology, completed in 1303. Compiled by Fujiwara Tameyo (Nijō school). 20 books, 1606 poems.
            • Shingoshūishū 新後拾遺集 (新後拾遺和歌集) (1383-4)

            • “New Later Collection of Gleanings [of Japanese Poems].” 20th imperial poetic anthology, compilation  by Fujiwara Tametō and Fujiwara Tameshige. Completed 1383, revised 1384. 20 books, 2554 poems. PCCJL notes that “the Japanese preface by Nijō Yoshimoto is worth attention” (230).
            • Shinkokinshū (Shinkokin wakashū) 新古今和歌集 (1216)

            • “New Collection of Ancient and Modern Poetry” (alternatively, “New Collection of Poems Ancient and Modern”). 8th imperial poetic anthology, compiled by Fujiwara no Teika and others in 1216. Abbreviated “SKKS.”
            • Translation in progress by Laurel Rasplica Rodd.
            • Morrell, Robert E. “The Shinkokinshū: Poems on Sakyamuni’s Teachings (Shakkyōka),” in Hare et al., The Distant Isle, 1996, pp. 281-320. [Complete, annotated translation of Book 20.]
            • Carter, Traditional Japanese Poetry, 1991. [Selections.]
            • Honda, H. H. The Shin kokinshū : the 13th-century anthology edited by Imperial edict. Tokyo: Hokuseido Press/Eirinsha Press, 1970. [Complete translation.]
            • Hammitzsch, Horst and Lydia Brull. Shinkokinwakashū. Japanische Gedichte. Stuttgart: Reclam, 1964. [Annotated selections]
            • Brower and Miner, JCP, 1961. [44 poems]
            • Pollack, David. The Fracture of Meaning: Japan’s Synthesis of China from the 8th through the 18th Centuries. Princeton, 1986. Part III “‘A Bridge Across the Mountains’: Chinese and the Aesthetics of the Shinkokinshū
            • Bundy, Roselee. “The uses of literary tradition; the poetry and poetics of the Shinkokinshū.” PhD diss. Chicago, University of Chicago, 1984.
            • e-text (Meiji shoin, 1925) at Kotenmura
            • Shin sarugaku ki 新猿楽記

              •    “A New Account of Sarugaku,” Chinese workSe by Fujiwara no Akihira (989?-1066)
              • Excerpt tr. in Keene, Seeds in the Heart, 1993, 349-350.

              Shinsen Waka 新撰和歌

              • A compilation by Ki no Tsurayuki 紀貫之 (ca. 872-945) of poems from the collection Kokinwakashū.
              • “Shinsen Waka” [“New Selection of Japanese Poetry”], trans. Helen Craig McCullough in McCullough, Kokin Wakashū, 1985, pp. 293-361.

              Shinsen zuinō 新撰髄脳

            • Teele, Nicholas J. “Rules for Poetic Elegance, Fujiwara no Kintō’s Shinsen zuinō & Waka kuhon.” MN 31: 2 (1976), 145-64.
            • Shinsenzaishū 新千載和歌集 

            • “New Collection of a Thousand Years.” 18th imperial poetic anthology completed by Fujiwara no Tamesada (Nijō school) in 1359.
            • Shinshō Hōshi nikki 信生法師日記

            • “Diary of Prince Shinshō” in  Plutschow and Fukuda, Four Japanese Travel Diaries, 1981, pp. 49-59.
            • Journey made in 10th month of 1225 by Priest Shinshō [Tomonari] (d. 1237).
            • Shinshokukokinshū (Shinshokukokinwakashū) 新続古今和歌集

            • “New Collection [of Japanese Poems] of Ancient and Modern Times Continued.” 21st and last imperial poetic anthology, compiled by Asuki no Masayo, completed in 1439. 20 books, 2144 poems. Prefaces in Japanese and Chinese by Ichijō Kanera. [PCCJL 232].
            • Shinshūishū (Shinshūiwakashū) 新拾遺和歌集 

            • “New Collection of Gleanings [of Japanese Poems].” 19th imperial poetic anthology. Compiled begun by Fujiwara Tameaki and completed in 1364 by Ton’a, both of Nijō school. 20 books, 1920 poems.
            • Shinto texts

            • → Kogo shūi, Kojiki, Nihon shoki, Yamato-hime no mikoto seiki.
            • Florenz, Quellen, 1919. (Reprint edition, 1997). // Could anyone with access to this book tell me the titles of texts translated here? One is Kojiki, I am told.
            • Shintōshū 神道集

            • “Shinto Stories.” (“Collection of the Way of Gods.”) Collection of fifty tales (setsuwa) compiled ca. 1358-1361. [PCCJL 232; Keene, Seeds, 985-89.]
            • Jesse, Bernd, “Der Weise Gott Ameisenmacht. Eine seltsame Geschichte aus dem japanischen Mittelalter,” in Gregor Paul, ed., Klischee und Wirklichkeit japanischer Kultur, 1987
            • Mills, D. E. “Soga monogatari, Shintoshū and the Taketori Legend.” MN 30: 1 (1975), 37-68.
            • Shin’yōshū 新葉集

              • “Collection of New Leaves” (1381), compiled by Emperor Godaigo’s eighth son Prince Munenaga. Three waka tr. in discussion in Keene, Seeds, 723-25.

              Shirakawa kikō 白河紀行

            • “Journey to Shirakawa.” Sōgi’s account of journey in 1468 to north (Tsukuba, Nikkō, Shirakawa).
            • Carter, Steven D. “Sōgi in the East Country: Shirakawa Kikō.” MN 42: 2 (1987), 167-209. 
            • Shōbōgenzō 正法眼蔵

            • “Treasury of the Eye of the True Dharma” / “The Eye Treasury of the Right Dharma” / “The Eye and Treasury of the True Law.” Composed between 1231-1253 by Dogen 道元 (1200-53).
            • Treasury of the Eye of the True Dharma.” Soto Zen Text Project. Carl Bielefeldt and Griffith Foulk, co-editors. William Bodiford and Stanley Weinstien, translatiors. [In progress.]
            • Nakamura and Ceccatty, Mille Ans, 1982, pp. 145-159. (“La réserve visuelle des événements dans leur justesse”) (仏)
            • Nakamura, Ryōji, and René Ceccatty. Shōbōgenzō – La réserve visuelle des événements dans leur justesse, de Dogen, extraits choisis, traduits et annotés. Paris: Editions de La Différence, 1980. (仏)
            • Nishiyama, Kosen, and John Stevens. Shōbōgenzō, the eye and treasury of the true law. Sendai: Daihokkaikaku, 1975.
            • Renondeau, Hōnen, Shinran, Nichiren et Dōgen, 1965.(仏)
            • Dumoulin, Heinrich. “Das Buch Genjōkōan: Aus dem Shōbōgenzō des Zen-Meisters Dōgen.” MN 15: 3/4 (1960), 425-40.
            • for other trans. see Herail 1986:24
            • e-text (Shōmonji.co.jp).
            • Shōbōgenzō zuimonki 正法眼蔵随聞記

            • “Record of Things Heard Concerning the Eye and Treasury of the True Law.” Compilation of sayings by Dōgen 道元 (1200-53) by disciple Ejō (1198-1280).
            • Cleary, Thomas. Record of things heard from Treasury of the eye of the true teaching… Bolder, ISBN Pranya Press, 1980. 129 p.
            • For more English, French and German trans. see Herail 1986:25.
            • e-text ed. H. Shinozaki from Daitō shuppansha ed. 1942.
            • Shogaku hyakushu 初学百首

            • Bundy, Roselee. “Poetic Apprenticeship: Fujiwara Teika’s Shogaku Hyakushu.” MN 45: 2 (1990), 157-188.
            • Shōji ninen in shodo onhyakushu 正治二年院初度御百首

            • Brower, Robert H. Fujiwara Teika’s hundred-poem sequence of the Shōji Era, 1200. Tokyo, Sophia University, 1978.  // “Fujiwara Teika’s Hundred-Poem Sequence of the Shōji Era.” Parts 1/2, MN 31: 3 (1976), 223-50, 31: 3, 333-92.
            • Shoku nihon kōki 続日本後紀

            • “Later Chronicle of Japan Continued” (Brownlee, Political Thought).
            • Fourth national history, covering years 833-50 (reign of Ninmyō). For earlier chronicles, see Nihon Shoki, Shoku Nihongi, Nihon Kōki. Completed 869.
            • facsimile online: Kyoto University Library
            • Shoku nihongi 続日本書紀

            • “Chronicle of Japan Continued” (Brownlee, Political Thought).
            • Second national history, following Nihon Shoki. Completed 797.
            • Lewin, Bruno. “Die Regierungsannalen des Kammu-Tennō. Shoku-Nihongi 36-40 und Nihon-koki 1-13 (780-806).” [= Hammitzsch, Horst: Rikkokushi], 1962, p. 1-291.
            • Snellen, J. B. “Shoku-Nihon-gi, Chronicles of Japan.” TAJS 2nd series, 11 (1934), 169-239 [trans. of chapters 1-3 (years 697-707)] and vol. 15 (1937), 210-278 [trans. of chapters 4-6 (years 707-715)].
            • Zachert, Herbert. “Die kaiserliche Erlasse des Shoku Nihongi.” Asia Major 8 (1933). REV Karow, MN 8 (1952).
            • Sansom, George. “Imperial edicts in the Shoku-Nihongi.” TAJS 2nd series (1924), 1-30.
            • Shokugosenshū / Shokugosenwakashū 続後撰和歌集

            • “Later Collection of Poetry, Continued.” 10th imperial poetic anthology, compiled by Fujiwara Tamaie, completed in 1251.
            • ShokugoShūishū / ShokugoShūiwakashū 続後拾遺和歌集

            • “Later Collection of Gleanings, Continued.” 16th imperial poetic anthology, compiled by Fujiwara Tamefuji and Fujiwara Tamesada, completed in 1325.
            • Shokukokinshū / Shokukokinwakashū 続古今和歌集

            • “Collection of Ancient and Modern Poetry, Continued.” 11th imperial poetic anthology, compiled by Fujiwara Tameie and others, completed in 1265. 
            • Matisoff, Legend, p. 165. [no. 1265]
            • Shokusenzaishū / Shokusenzaiwakashū 続千載和歌集

            • “Collection of a Thousand Years, Continued.”15th imperial poetic anthology, compiled by Fujiwara Tameyo, completed in 1320.
            • Shokushi naishinno shū 式子内親王集

            • Sato, Hiroaki, ed. String of Beads: Complete Poems of Princess Shikishi. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1993. 192 p.
            • Shokushūishū / ShokuShūiwakashū 続拾遺和歌集

            • Collection of gleanings of Japanese poems continued.” 12th imperial poetic anthology, compiled by Fujiwara Tamefuji, completed in 1278. Abbreviated “ShokuSIS.”
            • Brower and Miner, JCP, 1961. [2 poems]
            • Shōkyūki / Jōkyūki 承久記

            • Tyler, Royall. Before Heike and After: Hōgen, Heiji, Jōkyūki. (2012). Also as Kindle edition.
            • McCullough, William. Shōkyūki. An Account of the Shōkyū War of 1221.” MN 19: 1/2 (1964), 163-215. // [Part 2] 19: 3/4 (1964), 420-455.
            • McCullough, William. “The Azuma Kagami Account of the Shōkyū War.” MN 23: 1/2 (1960), 102-155. 
            • Brownlee, John S. “Crisis as Reinforcement of the Imperial Institution: The Case of the Jōkyū Incident, 1221.” MN 30: 2 (1975), 193-201. // “The Shōkyū War and the Political Rise of the Warriors.” MN 24: 1/2 (1969), 59-77. 
            • Terretti, V. ” Realtà storica e immagine letteraria del Jōkyū no Ran.” Giappone 27 (1987).
            • Shōmonki 将門記

            • “The Story of Masakado.” Account of campaigns against rebel Taira no Masakado (903?-940)
            • Brownlee, Political Thought, 1991, 70-72. [Short excerpt.]
            • Rabinovitch, Judith N. Shōmonki: The Story of Masakado’s Rebellion. Monumenta Nipponica Monograph 58. Tokyo: Sophia UP, 1986. REV. Borgen, JJS 14.1 (1988).
            • Stramigioli, Giuliana. “Masakadoki.” Rivista degli Studi Orientali 53 (1979), 1-69. [Complete translation into Italian.]
            • Stramigioli, Giuliana. “Preliminary Notes on Masakadoki and the Taira no Masakado Story.” MN 28.3 (1973), 261-293.
            • Shōtetsu monogatari 正徹物語

            • “Tale of Shōtetsu” (c.1450) by priest Shōtetsu (1381-1459). Medieval study of poetics (karonsho 歌論書) with autobiographical elements. Text in Karon nōgakuron (NKBT 65).
            • Arokay, Judit, trans. Shōtetsu: Gedanken zur Dichtung : eine japanische Poetik aus dem 15.
              Jahrhundert
              . Munich: Iudicium, 1999
            • Excerpts tr. in discussion in Keene, Seeds, 728-36.
            • Brower, Robert H., trans. Conversations with Shōtetsu. With an introduction and notes by Steven D. Carter. Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan, 1992.
            • Shūishū / Shūi wakashū 拾遺和歌集

            • “Collection of Gleanings of [Japanese Poems].” 3rd imperial poetic anthology. Comissioned by Retired Emperor Kazan, who may have played part in compilation. Perhaps chiefly compiled by Fujiwara Kintō  藤原公任 (966-1041). Completed between 1105 and 1011. 20 books, 1351 poems. [PCCJL 234-5]. Abbreviated in the literature as “SIS.”
            • Brower and Miner, JCP, 1961. [Seven poems.]
            • Shunki 春記

            • Diary of Fujiwara no Sukefusa 藤原資房 (1007-1057).
            • Hérail, Françine. Notes journalières de Fujiwara no Sukefusa. Traduction du “Shunki”. 2 vols. Hautes Etudes Orientales – Extreme Orient. Geneva: Droz, 2001/2004. 760 pp. [Vol. 1 covers years 1038-1040, vol. 2, 1040-1054.]. // REV: Royall Tyler, MN 59.3 (2004).
            • Hérail, Françine. Fujiwara no Sukefusa. Notes de l’hiver 1039. Paris: Gallimard, 1994. 131 p. [Tr. of entries from 1039.10.1 – 1040.1.16] 
            • von Verschuer, Charlotte. “La cour de Heian à travers le Shunki de Fujiwara no Sukefusa” Ebisu 27, Automne-hiver 2001, 45-68
            • Shutendōji 酒呑童子

            • Medieval tale (otogizōshi). NKBT 38.
            • Sieffert, René. Le Livre des contes. Paris: P.O.F., 1993, pp. 33-60 (“Shuten-dōji”).
            • tr. as “Saufbruderchen” by Naumann, Zauberschale, 1973, 322-337.
            • Sōchō shuki 宗長手記

              • Diary of renga poet Saiokuken Sōchō 柴屋軒宗長 (1448-1532).
              • Horton, H. Mack. The Journal of Sōchō. Stanford: Stanford UP, 2002. 367 p. [Annotated translation.]
              • Horton, H. Mack. Song in an Age of Discord: The Journal of Sōchō and Poetic Life in Late Medieval Japan. Stanford: Stanford UP, 2002. 421 p. [Study]

              Soga monogatari 曽我物語

            • Cogan, Thomas Joseph. The Tale of Soga. Tokyo: Tokyo University Press, 1987. REV: Childs, JAS 48.1(1985), 154-5; Matisoff, MN 43.1(1988), 101-103; Borgen, JAOS, 109.1 (1989).
            • Cogan, Thomas Joseph. “A study and complete translation of the Soga monogatari.” Ph.D. diss., University of Hawaii, 1982.
            • Kitagawa, Hiroshi. The Tale of the Soga Brothers. Hikone: Shiga Univ. Faculty of Economics, 1981. [Selections.]
            • Mills, D. E. “Soga Monogatari, Shintoshu, and the Taketori Legend: The Nature and Significance of Parallels between the manabon Soga Monogatari and Shintōshū, with Particular Reference to a Parallel Variant of the Taketori Legend.” MN 30: 1 (1975), 37-68.
            • Sumiyoshi monogatari 住吉物語

            • “The Tale of Sumiyoshi.” Kamakura-period fiction.
            • Negri, Carolina. La principessa di Sumiyoshi. Venezia: Marsilio, 2000. 114 p.
            • Keene, Seeds, 1993, 814-17. [Excerpt in translation.]
            • Parlett, Harold. “The Sumiyoshi Monogatari.” TASJ 29.1 (1901), 48-90.
            • e-text announced:  H. Shinozaki’s Taiju site.
            • facsimile of ehon. NIJL.
            • A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – M – N – O – R – S – T – U – W – Y – Z [return to top]

              Tachibana no Hayanari-den 橘逸勢伝

            • Tachibana no Hayanari 橘逸勢 (d. 842).
            • Bohner, Hermann. “Tachibana-no-Hayanari-den.” MN 5.1 (1942), 188-202.
            • Discussion: Robert Borgen, “The Japanese Mission to China, 801-806,” MN 37.1 (1982), 1-28.
            • Taiheiki 太平記

            • McCullough, Helen Craig. “A Military Tale: The Great Peace” in McCullough, Classical Japanese Prose, 1990, pp. 472-494. [Revised tr. of sections 4.5-7, 5.4, 9.6, 10.14-15.]
            • O’Neill, P. G. “A michiyuki passage from the Taiheiki,” BOAS 36 .2 (1973), 359-367.
            • Story of origin of Onimara and Onikiri tr. into German by Naumann, Zauberschale, 1973, 297-300. [From book 32, NKBT 36:225ff.]
            • McCullough, Helen Craig. The Taiheiki. New York: Columbia University Press, 1959. [Translation of first twelve of the forty maki.] REV: Edwin O. Reischauer, HJAS 23 (1960); D.E.Mills, JAS 19.3 (1960).
            • McCullough, Helen Craig. “A study of the Taiheiki, a medieval Japanese chronicle,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Berkeley, 1955. 423 p.
            • First part of section “Oto-no-miya Kumano-ochi no koto” (book 5) tr. as “Ootoo-no-miya’s flight to Kumano” in Daniels, Selections from Japanese Literature, 1953, 29-42, 138-141.
            • Koike, Kenji, and Josef Roggendorf, “Kusonoki Masashige. Auszüge aus dem Taiheiki.” MN 4: 1 (1941), 133-65.
            • Taiki 台記

            • Diary in kanbun by Fujiwara no Yorinaga 藤原頼長 (1120-1156).
            • Formula recited on Emperor Konoe’s accession ceremony in 1142 trans. in Philippi 1990:76-79 (12-14). See Norito.
            • Taishokan 大織冠

              • kōwakamai piece, issued in print in a Kōwaka (1609) and a Daigashira (1615–early 1620s) version
              • translation of the wide-spread Daigashira version, printed and illustrated in 1632 in: Melanie Trede, Image, Text and Audience: The Taishokan Narrative in Visual Representations of the Early Modern Period in Japan (Hamburg, New York: Peter Lang Verlag 2003), 27–53.
              • Squires, Todd Andrew. “Reading the Kōwaka-mai as Medieval Myth: Story-Patterns, Traditional Reference and Performance in Late Medieval Japan.” PhD dissertation. Ohio State University, 2001. Contains translation of Taishokan together with Daijin, Iruka, Shida, Taishokan. [UMI number 302256.]

              Takakura-in Itsukushima gokō ki 高倉院厳島御幸記

            • “Account of the Journey of the ex-Emperor Takakura to Itsukushima” in Plutschow and Fukuda, Four Japanese Travel Diaries, 1981.
            • by Koga 久我 (or Tsuchimikado 土御門 or Minamoto 源) Michichika 通親 (1149-1202).
            • Takamura monogatari 篁物語

            • “The Tale of Takamura.” Poem-tale concerning Ono no Takamura 小野篁 (802-853).
            • “Tales of Takamura” in Mostow, At the House of Gathered Leaves, 2004.
            • Excerpts tr. in  Keene, Seeds, 1993, 461-66
            • Geddes, Ward. “Takamura Monogatari.” MN 46: 3 (1991), 275-291.
            • e-text by H. Shinozaki (NKBT)
            • Takafusa-kyō tsuyakotoba emaki 高房卿艶詞絵巻

            • mid-Kamakura emaki dated ca. 1177 based on poems by Fujiwara Takafusa.
            • Series of poems titled simply 艶詞 (read “tsuya kotoba” rather than “enshi”)
            • recent annotated text in Waka bungaku taikei (Meiji shoin)
            • 式子内親王集・俊成卿女集・建礼門院右京大夫集・艶詞(和歌文学大系)
            • Takahashi ujibumi 高橋氏文

            • history, ca. 790.
            • Mills, D. E. “The Takahashi Uzibumi,” BOAS 16 (1954):113-133. [complete]
            • Takemukigaki 竹むきが記

            • “Account of the Takemuki Palace.” The diary of Hino Sukena no musume 日野資名女. Volume 1 covers years 1329-1333, vol. 2 years 1337-1349. [NKBD 1171]
            • Keene, Seeds, 1993, 844-47. [Short excerpts tr. in discussion.]
            • discussed in Hitomi Tomimura, “Re-envisioning Women in the Post-Kamakura Age,” in Jeffrey P. Mass, ed., The Origins of Japan’s Medieval World: Courtiers, Clerics, Warriors and Peasants in the Fourteenth Century (Stanford University Press, 1997): 138-69.
            • Taketori monogatari 竹取物語

            • “The Tale of the Bamboo-Cutter.” Early Heian period tale.
            • Boscaro, Adriana. Storia di un tagliabambù. Venezia: Marsilio, 1994.  [Italian]
            • Sieffert, René. Le Conte du Coupeur de bambous. Paris: POF, 1992. Originally published as: “Le conte du coupeur de bambous” in  Bulletin de la Maison Franco-Japonaise (1953).
            • Complete German translation in Naumann, Zauberschale, 1973, 45ff.
            • Keene, Donald. “The Tale of the Bamboo-Cutter.” Modern Japanese Fiction and Its Traditions. Ed. J. Thomas Rimer. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1978. O.P. Originally publ. in MN 11.4 (January, 1955) [JSTOR].
            • Matsubara, Naoko. Die Geschichte vom Bambussammler und dem Mädchen Kaguya. München: Langewiesche-Brandt, 1968.
            • Dickins, F. Victor. The old bamboo-hewer’s story (Taketori no okina no monogatari): the earliest of the Japanese romances, written in the tenth century. Trübner, 1888. Also in Dickins, Primitive and Mediaeval Japanese Texts (Oxford, 1906): introduction and translation as “The Story of the Old Bamboo Wicker-worker” in “Translations” volume, pp. 314-378;  transliterated text in companion volume of “Romanized Texts,” pp. 190-240, Both versions reprinted in Collected works of Frederick Victor Dickins; v. 3, v. 6, v. 7 (Bristol: Ganesha / Tokyo : Edition Synapse, 1999).
            • Webcat lists some 20 translations or adaptations of the story into Western languages. Those given above are those I know to be translations from the classical Japanese. Let me know if there are others.
            • e-text at Matsusaka Univ. (ftp site). Kokumin bunkobon (1910) e-text by H. Shinozaki.
            • e-text at JTI.
            • e-text and hypertext index (Prof. Kondo/Aoyama)
            • [studies]
            • Note that there are many adaptations for children. Look for “Taketori monogatari” on http://worldcat.org.
            • Tamekane kyō wakashō 為兼卿和歌抄

            • “Lord Tamekane’s Notes on Poetry.” Compiled by Kyōgoku Tamekane, ca. 1287.
            • Huey, Robert N., and Susan Matisoff “Lord Tamekane’s Notes on Poetry: Tamekanekyō Wakashō.” MN 40: 2 (1985), 127-46.
            • Tamuramaro-den 田邑麻呂伝

            • Bohner, Hermann. “Tamuramaro-denki.” MN 2 (1939).
            • Tannishō 歎異抄

            • “Lamentations over Divergences” written by disciple(s) of Shinran 親鸞 (1173-1262).
            • Bloom, Alfred. Strategies for modern living: a commentary with the text of the Tannisho. Berkeley: Numata Center for Buddhist Translation and Research, 1992. 88 pp.
            • Unno, Taitetsu. Tanninsho: A Shin Buddhist Classic. Honolulu: Buddhist Study Center Press, 1982.
            • Hirota, Dennis. Tanninsho: A Primer. Kyoto: Ryukoku University, 1982.
            • for other translations see Herail 1986: 23, Webcat, or worldcat.org (search for “Tanninsho” and select language). 
            • Tauezōshi 田植草紙

            • Azuchi-Momoyama song collection (“A Collection of Rice-Planting Songs”)
            • Hoff, Frank. The Genial Seed. New York: Mushinsha-Grossman, 1971. REV: Teele MN 28 (1973).
            • Tawara-tōda monogatari 俵藤太物語

            • Muromachi tale [translation?]
            • e-text (Kikuchi)
            • Tenzo kyōkun 典座教訓

            • Admonitions for the Chef by Dōgen 道元 (1200-1253)
            • Wright, Thomas. Refining your life: from the Zen kitchen to enlightenment. New York: Weatherhill, 1983.122 pp. [n.s.]
            • German tr. by Francois-A. Viallet (1976); French tr. by Janine Coursin (1994), etc.
            • future translation project of Sōtō Zen Text Project
            • Toga-no-o Myōe Shōnin Ikun  梅尾明恵上人遺訓

              • Final Injunctions of the Venerable Myōe of Toga-no-o” collected by Kōshin, disciple of Myōe 明恵 (1173-1232).
              • Morrell, Robert E. “Kamakura accounts of Myōe Shōnin as popular religious hero.” JJRS 9/2-3 (1982), 171–198 (online) [Complete translation, p. 182-195.]
              • [References to the work are also found under the title Myōe shōnin ikun 明恵上人遺訓 or simply Ikun 遺訓. The first character in the place-name 梅尾 Toga-no-o is usually read ume (plum), but here it is an ateji, standing in place of a rarer character 栂 read toga or tsuga that means Japanese hemlock.]

              Tō daiwajō tōseiden (Tōseiden) 東大和尚東征伝

            • account by Aomi-no-Mabito Genkai 真人元開(淡海三船)
            • Takakusu, Junijiro. Kanshin’s (Chien-Chen’s) voyage to the East, A.D. 742-54, by Aomi-no-Mabito Genkai (A.D. 779). London: Probsthain, 1925.
            • Takakusu, Junijiro. “Aomi-no-Mabito Genkai, 722-785: Le voyage de Kanshin en orient, 742-754,” BEFEO 28 (1929): 1-41, 441-472; 29 (1930): 47-62.
            • Tōhoku’in shokunin utaawase 東北院職人歌合

            • Author unknown. Traditionally dated Kenpō 2 (1214).
            • Vollmer, Klaus. “Professionen und ihre ‘Wege’ im mittelalterlichen Japan. Eine Einführung in ihre Sozialgeschichte und literarische Repraesentation am Beispiel des ‘Tōhoku’in shokunin utaawase'” [‘People of skill’ and their ‘ways’ in medieval Japan. An introduction to their social history and their literary representation in the ‘Tooku’in shokunin utaawase’]. Hamburg: OAG 1995. 551 p. ISBN 3-928463-55-1
            • Tōji kaden 藤氏家伝 (or Kaden 家伝)

            • Bohner, Hermann. “Kamatari-den, Taishoku kwanden Kaden, d.i. Haustraditionen (des Hauses Fujiwara).” MN 4 (1941); “Muchimaro-den, Kaden…” MN 5 (1942). [Lives of Nakatomi no Kamatari (614-669) and Michimaro (680-737).]
            • e-text ed. Koizuka (Nihon kodai rekishi home page) [info]
            • Tōkan kikō 東関紀行

            • Migliori, Maria Chiara. Il viaggio a ritroso. Genesi e tipologia dei diari di viaggio medievali giapponesi. Il Tōkan kikō (Diario di un viaggio a oriente). Napoli, Istituto Universitario Orientale, Dipartimento di Studi Asiatici, collana “Serie 3”, 8, 2002.
            • Pigeot, Jacqueline. Voyage dans les provinces de l’Est: Tokan kikō. Paris: Gallimard, 1999. 115 p.
            • McCullough, Helen Craig. “An Account of a Journey to the East” in McCullough, Classical Japanese Prose, 1990, pp. 421-446.
            • e-text ed. M. Shibata (KNKBT). e-text based on1925 edition by H. Shinozaki.
            • Tonna 頓阿 [poetry and prose]

              Tōnomine shōshō monogatari 多武峯少将物語 Tonom shoshoine

            • “The Tale of the Tōnomine Captain.” Also known as Takamitsu nikki (The Takamitsu Diary).
            • “The Takamitsu Diary” in Mostow, At the House of Gathered Leaves, 2004.
            • Short excerpts tr. in Keene, Seeds in the Heart, 1993, 371-74.
            • Gatten, Aileen. “Fact, Fiction, and Heian Literary Prose: Epistolary Narration in Tōnomine Shōshō Monogatari.” MN 53: 2 (1998), 153-196.
              Miyake, Lynne K. “Tōnomine Shōshō Monogatari: A Translation and Critical Study.” Ph.D. Berkeley, 1985.
            • e-text ed. M. Shibata (GSRJ)
            • e-text ed. H. Shinozaki (GSRJ)
            • Torikaebaya monogatari とりかへばや物語

            • “If I Could Only Change Them.” Late Heian tale.
            • Garde, Renée, Si on les échangeait: Le Genji travesti. Paris: Belles Lettres, 2009
            • Stein, Michael. Die Vertauschten Geschwister: ein hoefischer Roman aus dem Japan des 12. Jahrhunderts. Frankfurt am Main: Insel, 1994. // More detailed annotation in author’s dissertation: Das Torikaebaya-Monogatari. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 1979.
            • Willig, Rosette F. The Changelings: A Classical Japanese Court Tale. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1983.
            • Pfugfelder, Gregory M. “Strange Fates: Sex, Gender, and Sexuality in Torikaebaya Monogatari.” MN 47: 3 (1992), 347-68.
            • Tosa nikki 土佐日記

            • “The Tosa Diary.” Account by Ki no Tsurayuki of his return from Tosa to the capital in year 935.
            • Olbricht, Peter. Elegische Heimreise: ein japanisches Tagebuch aus dem Jahre 935, mit einem Nachwort von Irmela Hijiya-Kirschnereit. Frankfurt am Main: Insel, 2001, 61 p.
            • Sieffert, René. Ki no Tsurayuki: Le Journal de Tosa ; Poemes du Kokin-shu. Paris: P.O.F., 1993.
            • Included in: McCullough, Helen C. Kokin wakashū: The First Imperial Anthology of Japanese Poetry. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1985. [Complete translation also in Classical Japanese Prose (1990): 73-102]
            • Miner, Earl. Japanese Poetic Diaries. Berkeley, 1969. [O.P.]
            • Sergent, G.W. Selections in Keene, Anthology of Japanese Literature, 82-91.
            • [See Webcat for German translations of 1923 and 1946.]
            • Porter, William N. The Tosa diary. London: Henry Frowde, 1912. 148 pp. [Reprinted from Tuttle.] [Is this directly translated or based on Aston’s translation?]
            • Aston, William George. “An Ancient Japanese Classic: The Tosa Nikki, or Tosa Diary.” TASJ 2 (1875): 121-131. Reprinted in Peter F. Kornicki, ed., Collected Works of William George Aston (Bristol and Tokyo: Ganesha and Oxford UP,1997), 1:45-54.
            • e-text of Teika-bon ed. E. Shibuya (see also A. Okajima’s edition)
            • e-text of Kokubun Taikan edition (Aozora bunko)
            • Toshiyori zuinō 俊頼髄脳

            • Waka poetics in 2 vols., completed 1114 or 1115,  by Minamoto no Toshiyori (Shunzei) 源俊頼 (1055-1129).
            • excerpt tr. in David T. Bialock, “Voice, Text, and the Question of Poetic Borrowing in Late Classical Japanese Poetry,” HJAS 54. 1. (June, 1994), 183.
            • excerpt tr. in Matisoff, Legend, 1978, pp. 163-4.
            • excerpt tr. in Jacqueline Pigeot, Michiyukibun, 1982 [2009], pp. 129-130.
            • Towazugatari とはずがたり

            • Diary of Gofukakusa In Nijō 後深草院二条 (Nakanoin Masatada no musume 中院雅忠女), generally referred in English as “Lady Nijō.” Account opens in year 1271.
            • Title more literally translates as “The Unrequested Tale” (PCCJL 57) or “A Tale Nobody Asked For” (Keene, Seeds, 841).
            • Rocher, Alain. Dame Nijô, Splendeurs et miseres d’une favorites. Arles: Philippe Picquier, 2003. 713 p.
            • Origlia, Lydia. Diario di una concubina imperiale. Milan: SE, 1996.
            • McCullough, Classical Japanese Prose, 1990. [Book 1]
            • Whitehouse, Wilfrid and Eizo Yanagisawa. Lady Nijō’s Own Story. Tuttle, 1974. REV: Tahara MN 29 (1974).
            • Brazell, Karen. Confessions of Lady Nijō. Stanford UP, 1973. // “A study and partial translation of Towazugatari.” Ph.D. thesis. Columbia University, 1969.
            • Krempien, Rainer. Towazugatari: Uebersetzung und Bearbeitung eines neuaufgefundenen literarischen Werkes der Kamakura-Zeit. Freiburg im Breisgau: Schwarz, 1973.
            • studies (Marra 1991)
            • Tsukushi no michi no ki  築紫道記

              • “Journey Along the Tsukushi Road.” Account of renga master Sōgi’s journey in northern Kyūshū.
              • Kato, Eileen. “Pilgrimage to Dazaifu: Sōgi’s Tsukushi no Michi no Ki.” MN 34: 3 (1979), 333-68

              Tsuma kagami 妻鏡

              • “Mirror for Wives.” By Kamakura monk Mujū Ichien 無住一円 (1226-1312)
              • Morrell, Robert E. “Mirror for Women: Mujū Ichien’s Tsuma Kagami.” MN 35: 1 (1980), 45-76.

              Tsurezuregusa 徒然草

            • “Essays in Idleness” by Yoshida Kenkō 吉田兼好 (Urabe Kenkō 卜部兼好).
            • McKinney, Meredith, trans. Kenkō and Chōmei: Essays in Idleness and Hōjōki. (Penguin, forthcoming). Paperback and Kindle editions.
            • Berndt, Joergen. Draussen in der Stille. Berlin: edition q / Quintessenz Verlag, 1993 (ISBN: 3-86124-155-2)
            • McCullough, Classical Japanese Prose, 1990. [60 of 243 sections translated]
            • Czech trans. Zapisky z volnych chvil : starojaponske literarni zapisniky Praha : Odeon, 1984. [With Makura no sōshi and Hōjōki]
            • Grosbois, Charles, and Tomiko Yoshida. Les heures oisives par Urabe Kenkō. Suivi de Notes de ma cabane de moine par Kamo no Chōmei, traduction du R.P.Sauveur Candau. Paris: Gallimard/Unesco, 1968. [Translations of Tsurezuregusa and Hōjōki.]
            • Keene, Donald. Essays in Idleness: The Tsurezuregusa of Kenkō. New York: Columbia U.P., 1967. [Tuttle reprint ed. 1981]
            • Benl, Oscar. Betrachtungen aus der Stille. 1963. Reprinted by Frankfurt/M: Insel Verlag/Suhrkamp, 1997. [The title given means something like “Considerations from tranquility.” In the preface, Benl notes that a more literal German translation would be “Aufzeichnungen aus Mußestunden.”
            • Yoshida Kenko, Essays in Idleness, tr. by G B Sansom, ed. with an introduction by Noel Pinnington, Hertfordshire, U.K.: Wordsworth Editions Limited, 1998. Originally published in TASJ in 1911. [UK]
            • studies (Chance 1997; Marra 1991)
            • e-text ed. M. Shibata (KNKBT); e-text ed. H. Shinozaki
            • Tsutsumi chūnagon monogatari 堤中納言物語

            • “The Riverside Counselor’s Tales.” Collection of ten tales. Their dates of composition differ widely: most are from the 11th-12th centuries, but the last tale is from the 13th or 14th century. Titles are given below in the standard English translation by Robert Backus:
              1. “The Lieutenant Plucks a Sprig of Flowering Cherry” (Hana sakura oru chūjō 花桜折る中将); 
              2. “Apropos of This” (Kono tsuide このついで); 
              3. “The Lady Who Admired Vermin” (Mushi mezuru himegimi 虫愛づる姫君); 
              4. “Courtship at Different Levels” (Hodo hodo no  kesō ほどほどの懸想); 
              5. “The Provisional Middle Counselor Who Failed to Cross the Divide” (Ōsaka koenu gonchūnagon 逢坂越えぬ権中納言) [Ōsaka refers to the Ōsaka no seki, the “Pass of Meeting.”]
              6. “The Shell-Matching Contest” (Kai-awase 貝合); 
              7. “The Lieutenants Who Lodged in Unexpected Quarters” (Omowanu kata ni tomarisuru shōshō 思はぬ方にとまりする少将); 
              8. “The Flower Ladies” (Hanahana no onna ko 花々のをんな子); 
              9. “Lampblack” (Haizumi はい墨); 
              10. “Folderol” (Yoshinashigoto よしなしごと).

            • Garde, Renée. Contes du conseiller de la digue. Arles: P. Piquier, 2001. [Complete tr. into French.]
            • McCullough, Classical Japanese Prose, 1990. [Tales #1, 3, and 9 trans. as “The Lesser Captain Plucks a Sprig of Flowering Cherry,” “The Lady Who Admired Vermin,” and “Lampblack”]
            • Kubota, Yoko. Le Concubine Floreali: Storie del Consigliere di Mezzo di Tsutsumi. Venice: Marsilio Editori, 1989. [Complete Italian tr.]
            • Backus, Robert L. The Riverside Counselor’s Stories: Vernacular Fiction of Late Heian Japan. Stanford UP, 1985. [Complete translation. Tale titles given above.]
            • Benl, Der Kirschblütenzweig, 1985. [Tales #1, 5, and 9 trans. as”Der Shōshō bricht Kirschblüten,” “Der Gon-Chūnagon kommt über den Berg nicht hinweg,” “Der Aschenpuder,” pp. 101-128.]
            • Umeyo Hirano. The Tsutsumi Chunagon Monogatari: A Collection of 11th-Century Short Stories of Japan. The Hokuseido Press, 1963. 105 p.
            • Tale #1 trans. as “The Minor Captain who plucked the cherry-blossom” in Daniels, Selections from Japanese Literature, 1953.
            • Reischauer, Edwin O., and Joseph K. Yamagiwa, tr. “Tsutsumi chunagon monogatari,” in Reischauer and Yamagiwa 1951. [Complete trans., pp. 139-267.]
            • Benl, Oscar. “Tsutsumi Chūnagon Monogatari.” MN 3:2 (June 1940), 504-24. [Summaries of all ten tales with discussion of Japanese scholarship. None is translated.]
            • Tale #3 “Mushi mezuru hime” tr. Arthur Waley in Waley, The Lady Who Loved Insects (London: The Blackamore Press, 1929). 33 pp. Reprinted in Keene, Anthology, 1955. [Only 550 copies of first edition, the first 50 signed. For details see second-hand copies at B&N]
            • studies (Marra 1991)
            • e-text based on 1925 edition by H. Shinozaki
            • A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – M – N – O – R – S – T – U – W – Y – Z [return to top]

              Uji shūi monogatari 宇治拾遺物語

            • Sieffert, René. Supplement aux contes d’Uji. Paris: P.O.F., 1986. 341 p. [Complete] O.P.
            • Mills, D. E. A Collection of Tales from Uji: A Study and Translation of Uji Shūi monogatari. Cambridge University, 1970. [Complete] // REV Cranston, MN, 27.1 (1972).
            • 21 tales tr. into German by Naumann, Zauberschale, 1973, 219-251.
            • tales 3/16 and 8/3 tr. by Robert Brower in Keene, Anthology, 1955.
            • Forster, John S. “Uji Shūi Monogatari: Selected Translation.” MN 20: 1/2 (1965), 135-208. [55 tales. Title trans. as “Tales from the Later Gleanings of Uji.”]
            • Urashima Taro 浦島太郎 (otogizōshi)

            • Sieffert, René. Le Livre des contes. Paris: P.O.F., 1993. p. 19-32.
            • e-text by H. Shinozaki
            • Urihime 瓜子姫 (otogi-zōshi)

            • Sieffert, René. Le Livre des contes. Paris: P.O.F., 1993. p. 5-12.
            • Uta-awase genre 歌合

            • Genre of poetry competitions / poetry matches (Fr. “concours de poémes”).
            • Ito, Setsuko. An Anthology of Traditional Japanese Poetry Competitions: Uta-awase 913-1815. Chinathemen, vol. 57. Bochum: Brockmeyer, 1991. // “The muse in competition: Uta-awase through the ages.” MN 37: 2 (Summer 1982), 201-222. // “A study of the development of poetry competitions.” Ph.D. London, 1978.
            • translations of specific uta-awase:
            • Huey, Robert N. “Fushimi-in Nijūban Uta-awase.” MN 48: 2 (1993), 167-204. [Study of competition that took place between 1303 and 1308.]
            • Pigeot, Michiyuki-bun, p. 146-7. Poem and judgement tr. from Bunji ninen jūgatsu nijūyokka dazai go-no-sochi Tsunefusa uta awase 文治二年十月廿四日太宰権師経房歌合 held 1186. Judgement by Fujiwara no Suetsune (1130-1221).
            • Utatane うたたね

            • “Fitful Slumbers.” Early work in diary form by Abutsu (d. 1293).
            • Wallace, John R. “Fitful Slumbers: Nun Abutsu’s Utatane.” MN 43: 4 (1988), 391-416.
            • e-text ed. M. Shibata (GSRJ)
            • e-text ed. A. Okajima
            • Utsuho monogatari (Utsubo monogatari) うつほ物語(宇津保物語)

            • “The Tale of the Hollow Tree.” Late 10th century? Sometimes attributed to Minamoto no Shitagō (911-983). Overview: Keene, Seeds, 441-46.
            • Uraki, Ziro. The Tale of the Cavern. Tokyo: Shinozaki Shorin, 1984. O.P.
            • Lammers, Wayne P. “The Succession (Kuniyuzuri): A Translation from Utsuho Monogatari.” MN 37: 2 (1982), 139-178.
            • Cranston, Edwin A. “Atemiya. A Translation from the Utsubo monogatari.” MN 24.3 (1969), 289-314.
            • see entry on studies page
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              Wagami ni tadoru himegimi

              • “The Princess in Search of Herself.” Kamakura-period monogatari. 
              • Keene, Seeds, 1993, 804-8. Short excerpts included in summary and discussion.

              Waka translations

            • See individual collections by name. To locate them, search this page for “poem” or “poetry.”
            • Among the many anthologies, note especially:
            • Cranston Edwin A.  A Waka Anthology: The Gem-Glistening Cup. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1993. // Cranston, Edwin. A Waka Anthology: Grasses of Remembrance. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006. 1312 pages.
            • Carter, Steven D. Traditional Japanese Poetry: An Anthology: Stanford University Press, 1986. [Pbd. 1993]
            • Sato, Hiroaki, and Burton Watson, eds. From the Country of Eight Islands. An Anthology of Japanese Poetry. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1981. [Reprint Columbia UP] 
            • Waley, Arthur. Japanese Poetry: The Uta. [Oxford : Clarendon Press, 1919. 110 pages. O.P. Reprinted: London: Lund Humphries, 1946; Allen and Unwin, 1976 [introduction by Carmen Blacker], University Press of Hawaii, 1976. Japanese edition translated by Kawamura Hatsue, 1989)
            • Basil Hall Chamberlain, The Classical Poetry of the Japanese (J. R. Osgood, 1880). Of historical interest as the earliest substantial study/translation in English.  [Reprinted by Routledge in 2000. A Japanese translation by Kawamura Hatsu was published in 1987. Project Gutenberg has an electronic text (together with Suematsu’s Genji and Chamberlain’s translations of two plays). ]
            • Recent studies include:
            • Kamens, Edward. Utamakura, Allusion, and Intertextuality in Traditional Japanese Poetry. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1997.
            • Wakan rōei shū (Wakanrōeishū) 和漢朗詠集

            • Collection of Japanese and Chinese poems, edited by Fujiwara no Kintō 藤原公任 (966-1041).
            • Poems nos. 29, 100, 242, 492, 546, 547, 548, 549, 555, 583, 588, 721, 789 translated with an introduction by Saeko Shibayama in Shirane, TJL (2007), 285–292.
            • Rimer, J. Thomas and Jonathan Chaves, eds. and trans. Japanese and Chinese Poems to Sing: The Wakan Rōei Shū. New York: Columbia UP, 1997. [Complete translation]
            • Harich-Schneider, Eta. “Rōei: The Medieval Court Songs of Japan.” [Includes translations of the rōei from Wakan rōei shū.] MN 13: 3/4 (1957), 183-222, 14: 1/2 (1958), 91-118, 14: 3/4 (1959), 319-55, 15: 3/4 (1959), 415-24.
            • study: Smits, Ivo. “Song as Cultural History: Reading Wakan Rōeishū (Texts).” MN 55: 2 (Summer 2000), 225-56; “Song as Cultural History: Reading Wakan Rōeishū (Interpretations).” 55: 3 (Autumn 2000), 399-428.
            • The title is also translated as “Collection of Japanese and Chinese Poems for Singing” (Keene, Seeds in the Heart, 341).
            • Waka shōgaku shō 和歌小学抄

            • Poetry manual written in 1169 by Fujiwara no Kiyosuke 藤原清輔 (1104-1177).
            • discussed in Pigeot, Michiyuki-bun, 1982, 131-5.
            • Wake no Kiyomaro den 和気清麻呂伝

            • (around 830)
            • Bohner, Hermann. “Wake-no-Kiyomaro-den. MN 3: 1 (1940), 240-73.
            • Wamyōruijushō 倭名類聚鈔

              • Dictionary compiled ca. 931-938.
              • Karow, Otto. “Die Wörterbucher der Heianzeit und ihre Bedeutung fur die japanische Sprachgeschichte. [Teil 1: Das Wamyoruijusho des Minamoto no Shitagau.] MN 7 (1951), 156-97.

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              Yakaku Teikinshō 夜鶴庭訓抄

              • Oldest extant calligraphic treatise in Japan, ca. 1170-75, by Fujiwara Koreyuki 藤原伊行 (1123?-1175), sixth head of Sesonji 世尊寺 school of calligraphy. 
              • DeCoker, Gary, and Alex Kerr. “Yakaku Teikinshō. Secret Teachings of the Sesonji School of Calligraphy.” MN 49.3 (Autumn, 1994), 315-329. [Tr. from 319.]
              • Gary DeCoker has also translated two other early treatises on calligraphy, see entries for Saiyōshō (late twelfth century) and Jubokushō (fourteenth century).

              Yakamochishu 家持集

            • Poetry collection of Man’yō poet Ōtomo Yakamochi 大伴家持.
            • [e-text | info]
            • Yamato-hime no mikoto seiki 倭姫命世記

            • Shinto text in one volume. Now believed to be a mid-Kamakura work, and not 7th century as collophon claims. [NKBD 1851/2]
            • Hammitzsch, Horst. Yamato-hime no Mikoto Seiki. Leipzig, 1937.
            • Yamato monogatari 大和物語

            • “The Tales of Yamato.” Mid tenth-century poem-tale in 179 episodes.
            • Tahara, Mildred. Tales of Yamato: A Tenth-Century Poem-Tale. Honolulu, 1980. [O.P.][Webcat]
            • Sieffert, René. Contes de Yamato suivis du dit de Heichū. Paris: P.O.F., 1979. 191 p. O.P.
            • Selections in German in Naumann, Zauberschale, 1973, 87-106.
            • Tahara, Mildred. “Yamato Monogatari.” MN 27: 1 (1972), 1-38. // “Heichū, as Seen in Yamato Monogatari.” MN 26: 1/2 (1971), 17-48.
            • Kobayashi, H. “The ‘Ashikari Tale,’ a Tenth-Century Japanese Story of a Reed Cutter and Its Possible Source.” Journal of the Oriental Society of Australia 11 (1976), 19-36.
            • e-text (1925) ed. H. Shimozaki
            • Yokobue 横笛 (medieval tale)

            • Dykstra, Yoshiko, and Yuko Kurata. “The Yokobue-sōshi: Conflicts Between Social Convention, Human Love and Religious Renunciation”. Japanese Religions 26:2 (July 2001), 117-129.
            • Letten, Linda Kay. “The Declining Status of Women in Early Medieval Japan: ‘The Tale of Yokobue’ and Heian Court Life.” M.A. thesis, the University of Hawaii. Translation: pp. 48-68.
            • Pigeot, Jacqueline. Histoire de Yokobue [Yokobue no sōshi]. Bulletin de la Maison Franco-Japonaise, Nouvelle Serie, 9.2. Paris: Presses Univ. de France, 1972. *This contains translations of different accounts of Yokobue, including the episode in Heike monogatari, book 10. See Heike entry for translations of this episode (most recently in German).
            • Ruch, Barbara. “Transformation of a Heroine: Yokobue in Literature and History” in Heinrich, ed., Currents in Japanese Culture, 1997, 99-116.
            • Yōrō-ryō 養老令

            • Nara-period legal code.
            • Sansom, George, T.A.S.J, 2nd series IX, 1932; XI, 1934. [from books 2, 6, 7, 8]
            • Dettmer, Hans. Die Steuergesetzgebung der Nara-Zeit, Wiesbaden, 1959. [Selections]
            • e-text ed. Koizuka (Nihon kodai reshishi home page) [info]
            • Yoru no nezame / Yowa no nezame 夜の寝覚

            • “Wakefulness at Night.” Heian-period tale.
            • Hochstedler, Carol Yoder. The Tale of Nezame, part 3 of Yowa no Nezame-monogatari. Ithaca, New York: China-Japan Program, 1979.
            • Richard, Kenneth Leo. “Developments in Late Heian Prose Fiction: ‘The Tale of Nezame.'” Ph.D. dissertation. University of Washington, 1973.
            • Overview: Keene, Seeds, 530-36.
            • Yoru no tsuru 夜の鶴

            • “The Crane at Night.” Poetic criticism by Abutsu 阿仏 (d. 1283).
            • e-text ed. M. Shibata (GSRJ)
            • Yotsugi monogatari 世継物語

            • Historical tale (rekishi monogatari).
            • Guelberg, Niels. Kleine literarische Denkmäler des japanischen Mittelalters II: Das Yotsugi monogatari. 1989 [unpublished German translation; Internet-edition forthcoming].
            • Yume no kayoiji [monogatari] 夢の通ひ路(物語)

            • giko monogatari in six volumes. Late Nanbokuchō.
            • Yume no ki 夢の記

              • “Dream diary” by Myōe Shōnin 明恵上人 (1173-1232)
              • Tanabe, George J., Jr. Myōe the Dreamkeeper: Fantasy and Knowledge in Early Kamakura Buddhism. Cambridge: Council on East Asian Studies, Harvard University, 1992. 291 p. [Translation included in study.] REV: Susan Tyler, HJAS 55.1 (June, 1995), 269-273.

              Yuyama sangin hyakuin (Yunoyama) 湯山三吟百韻 (1491)

            • Poem composed in 1491 by Sōgi 宗祇, Shōhaku 肖柏 and Sōchō 宗長. For another work by these renga poets, see Minase sangin hyakuin.
            • Carter, Stephen D. Three poets at Yuyama. Berkley, University of California, 1983.
            • Carter, Stephen D. “Three poets at Yuyama; Sōgi and Yuyama Sangin hyakuin, 1491,” MN 33: 22 (1978), 119-149; 33: 33: 3, 241-283.
            • “Three Poets at Yuyama” tr. Sato in Sato and Watson 1981, 254-261
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              Zazen yōshinki 坐禅用心記

            • by Kamakura monk Keizan Jōkin 瑩山紹瑾
            • Dumoulin, Heinrich. “Das Merkbuch fur die Uebung des Zazen des Zen-Meisters Keizan.” MN 13 (1957): 329-46.
            • Zazen-ron& nbsp;坐禅論

            • by Daikaku Zenji 大覚禅師 (1213-1278)
            • Translated as “On meditation” in Trevor Leggett, Zen and the Ways, London: Routledge and K. Paul, 1978.
            • Zeami jūroku bushū 世阿弥十六部集

            • “Sixteen treatises by Zeami” 世阿弥 [Zeami Motokiyo 元清] (1363?-1443?). This is a modern term, from the first modern publication: Yoshida Tōgo 吉田東伍, Zeami jūroku bushū: Nōgaku koten 世阿彌十六部集   能楽古典 (Nōgakkai 能学会, 1909). [Webcat]
            • After the discovery or re-appearance of other critical texts, scholars now attribute to Zeami as many as 21 treatises. At the risk of some repetition, it seems most useful to begin with (1) standard collections of translations, and then to proceed to (2) titles translated or discussed, and (3) general discussion of Zeami’s theoretical writings. 
            • (1) major collections of translations
            • Tom Hare, Zeami: Performance notes (Columbia UP, 2008) = Hare 2008. [Twenty-one works as indicated below, omitting only Sarugaku dangi. Zeami’s two autograph letters to Konparu Zenchiku are also included: “Two Letters to Master Konparu” (世阿弥直筆の金春禅竹宛).]
            • Rimer, Thomas, and Yamazaki Masakazu. On the Art of the Nō Drama: The Major Treatises of Zeami. Princeton, 1983. [Fushikaden, Shikadō, Kakyō, Yūgaku shūdō fūken, Kyūi, Sandō (=Nōsakusho), Shūgyoku tokka, Shūdōsho, Sarugaku dangi.]
            • Benl, Oscar. Die geheime Überlieferung des Nō. Frankfurt: Insel, 1961. 170 p. [Fūshikaden, Kakyō, Shikadō, Nikyoku santai ezu, Yūgaku shōdō fūken, Kyūi shidai, Museki isshi]
            • Sieffert, René. Zeami, La tradition secrète du nō, suivie de Une journee de nō. Paris, 1960. [Fushikaden, Kakyō, Shikadōsho, Nikyoku santai ezu, Yūgaku shūdō kenpū sho, Kyūi shidai, together with five noh plays and five kyōgen.]
            • Tsunoda, Ryusaku, Wm Theodore de Bary, and Donald Keene, ed. Sources of Japanese Tradition, vol. 1. Columbia University Press, 1958. [Selections tr. in Chapter XIV, pp. 282-297.]
            • To add: German translations by Hermann Bohner dating from 1945 to 1961. (See for now here.)
            • There are numerous translations into modern Japanese of Zeami’s writings. One used in compiling this entry is: Konishi Jin’ichi 小西甚一, Zeami nōgaku ronshū 世阿弥能楽論集 (Tachibana shuppan, 2004), a reprint of Zeami shū, Nihon no shisō vol. 8 (Chikuma shobō, 1970). This contains texts (lightly annotated) and translations of Zeami’s writings (including some letters but excluding Sarugaku dangi). Referred to as Konishi 2004 below.
            • (2) treatises and other writings attributed to Zeami.
            • Secondary sources vary in the list of titles. Some works are known under more than one title, “with some overlapping as shorter works sometimes became part of longer” (PCCJL, p. 366). Here is a list in alphabetical order, with dates according to their collophons. Fūkyokushū 風曲集 (ca. 1423), Fūshikaden 風姿花伝 (1400),  Go’i 五位, Goon 五音, Goongyoku jōjō 五音曲条々, Kakyō 花鏡 (1424), Kintōsho 金島書 (1436), Kyokufu shidai 曲附次第, Kyakuraika 却来華 (1433), Kyūi 九位, Museki isshi 夢跡一紙 (1432), Nikyoku santai ningyōzu 二曲三体人形図 (Nikyoku santai ezu 二曲三体絵図) (1421), Ongyoku [kowadashi] kuden  音曲口伝(音曲声出口伝)(1419), Rikugi 六義 (1428), Sandō 三道 (1423), Sarudangi 申楽談儀 (1430) (=Zeshi rokujū igo Sarugaku dangi), Shikadō 至花道 (1420), Shūdōsho 習道書 (1430), Shūgyoku tokka 拾玉得花 (1428), Yūgaku shōdō fūken 遊楽習道風見 (ca. 1423), Zeshi rokujū igo Sarugaku dangi 世子六十以後申楽談儀 (1430).
            • Fūkyokushū [Fūgyokushū] 風曲集 (ca. 1423)
            • Hare 2008 (“A Collection of Jewels in Effect”).
            • Title trans. as “A Collection Concerning Musical Performances” (Rimer and Yamazaki 1983: xlix). Text/trans.: Konishi 2004: 257-266.
            • Fūshikaden 風姿花伝 (1400)
            • Hare 2008 (“Transmitting the Flower Through Effects and Attitudes”).
            • Wilson, William Scott. The Flowering Spirit: Classic Teachings on the Art of Nō, Zeami, Kodansha International, Tokyo, Japan, 2006. [Fūshikaden. With nō play Atsumori.]
            • Rimer and Yamazaki 1983 (“Teachings on Style and the Flower”).
            • Benl 1961; Sieffert 1960 (“De la transmission de la fleur de l’interprétation”).
            • Donald Keene in Keene, Anthology of Japanese Literature … to 19th Century, 260-2. (Selections). Selections also in Tsunoda et al, Sources of Japanese Tradition.
            • Shidehara, Michitarō, and Wilfrid Whitehouse.”Seami Jūroku Bushū: Seami sixteen treatises.” MN 4: 2 (1941), 204-239; 5: 2 (1942), 466-500. [Introduction, followed by complete translation of “Kwadensho”(“The book of Flower”), “Properly Fūshi Kwaden 風姿花伝,  The flower in form.”]
            • Title also trans. as “Teachings in the Style and the Flower” (PCCJL p. 263). Konishi 2004: 27-116.
            • Fushizuke shidai 曲付次第
            • Hare 2008 (“Technical Specifications for Setting a Melody”).
            • Title trans. as “Treatise on the Application of Melody” (Rimer and Yamazaki 1983: xlix). As one of the traditional 16 treatises, this was known as Kyokuzukusho 曲附書. Konishi 2004: 239-256.
            • Goi 五位
            • Hare 2008 (“Five Ranks”).
            • Text discovered in 1942. Konishi 2004: 279-283.
            • Goon 五音
            • Hare 2008 (“Five Sorts of Singing”).
            • Title also translated as “Five Tones.” Manuscript discovered in 1930. Konishi 2004: 367-378.
            • Goongyokujōjō [Go ongyoku no jōjō] 五音曲条々
            • Hare 2008 (“Articles on the Five Sorts of Singing”).
            • Title trans. as “Various Matters Concerning the Five Modes of Musical Expression” (Rimer and Yamazaki 1983: xlix). Konishi 2004: 329-343. Called Goongyokujōjō in 1909 publication of 16 treatises. One manuscript titled Goongyoku 五音曲, another untitled.
            • Hitokata 一形
            • Another name for Nikyou sandai ezu. Konishi 2004: 154-165.
            • Kashū no uchi nukigaki 花習内抜書 (1418)
            • Hare 2008 (“An Extract from Learning the Flower”).
            • Kyakuraika 却来華 (1433)
            • Hare 2008 (“The Flower in…Yet Doubling Back”).
            • Nearman, Mark J. “Kyakuraika: Zeami’s Final Legacy for the Master Actor.” MN 35:2 (1980), 153-98.
            • Title trans. as “The Flower of Returning” (Rimer and Yamazaki 1983: l). Konishi 2004: 358-364. Called 七十以後口伝 in 1909 publication of 16 treatises.
            • Kakyō 花鏡 (1424)
            • Hare 2008 (“A Mirror to the Flower”).
            • Rimer and Yamazaki 1983 (“A Mirror Held to the Flower”); Benl 1961; Sieffert 1960 (“Le miroir de la fleur”).
            • Nearman, Mark J. “Kakyō, Zeami’s fundamental principals of acting.” MN 37-38 (1982-3) [in three parts]. [MN 37:3 (1982), 333-342 [Introduction], 343–374 [Translation, Part One]; MN 37:4, 459-96 (1982) [Part Two]; MN 38:1 (1983), 49-71 [Part Three]. Title trans. as “A Mirror of the Flower.”
            • PCCJL also translates title as “A Mirror of the Flower” (p. 263).
            • Text: Konishi 2004: 188-238.
            • Kashu 花習
            • A first draft of Kakyō, containing a shorter version of the section Nō ni jōhakyū no koto 能序破急事. Note the reading Kashu rather than -shū.  Konishi 2004: 119-126.
            • Kintōsho 金島書 (1436)
            • Matisoff, Susan. “Kintō-sho, Zeami’s song of exile.” MN 32:4 (1977), 441-58.
            • Sieffert, René. L’Ile d’or; suivi de Sumidagawa. Paris: P.O.F., 1995. 94 p [Kintōsho, with noh play Sumidagawa]
            • Title trans. as “The Book of Golden Island” (Rimer and Yamazaki 1983: xlix).
            • Text: Konishi 2004: 382-390.
            • Kyūi (shidai) 九位(次第)
            • Hare 2008 (“Nine Ranks”).
            • Immoos, Thomas: “Zeami: ‘Neun-Stufen-Folge,'” in Referate des 1. Japanologentages der OAG in Tokyo, 1990, p. 63-71. 
            • Rimer and Yamazaki 1983 (“Notes on the Nine Levels”).
            • Nearman, Mark J. “Zeami’s Kyūi,  a pedagogical guide for teachers of acting.” MN 33.3 (1978), 299-332. [“the nine levels”]`
            • Benl 1961.
            • Sieffert 1960 (Kyūi shidai, “L’échelle des neuf degrés”).
            • Tsunoda et al., Sources of Japanese Tradition, 1958, 1:286-290 [“The Nine Stages of the Nō in Order.” Selections].
            • Bohner, H. “Seami, der neun Stufen Folge (Kyu-i-shi-dai).” MOAG, 1943.
            • Text: Konishi 2004: 287-295.
            • Museki isshi 夢跡一紙 (1432)
            • Hare 2008 (“Traces of a Dream on a Single Sheet”).
            • Ortolani, Benito, and Nishi Kazuyoshi. “The Year of Zeami’s Birth: with a translation of the Museki Isshi.” MN 20:3/4 (1965), 319-34.
            • O’Neill, P. G. “The Year of Zeami’s Birth: A New Interpretation of Museki Isshi.” MN 34:2 (1979), 231-38.
            • Benl 1961
            • Text: Konishi 2004: 379-381.
            • Nikyoku santai ningyōzu 二曲三体人形図 (1421)
            • Hare 2008 (“Figure Drawings of the Two Arts and the Three Modes”).
            • Title trans. as “Illustrations for the Two Basic Arts and Three Role Types” (Rimer and Yamazaki 1983: xlix).
            • Benl 1961; Sieffert 1960 (Nikyoku santai ezu, “Etude illustrée des deux éléments et des trois types” = Nikyoku santai ezu 二曲三体絵図). 
            • Also known as Hitokata 人形. Konishi 2004: 154-165.
            • Nō sakusho 能作書
            • “The Three Elements in Composing a Play.” See entry under alternative name of Sandō.
            • Text: Konishi 2004: 166-187.
            • Ongyoku [kowadashi] kuden [ongyoku kuden] 音曲口伝(音曲声出口伝)(1419)
            • Hare 2008 (“Oral Instructions on Singing”).
            • title translated as “Treatise on Musical and Vocal Production” (Rimer and Yamazaki 1983); “Oral Instruction in Singing” (Sidebara and Whitehouse 1941)
            • Rikigi 六義 (1428)
            • Hare 2008 (“Six Principles”)
            • Title trans. as “Six Principles” (Rimer and Yamazaki 1983: xlix). Manuscript is untitled.
            • Text: Konishi 2004: 296-301.
            • Sandō 三道 (1423), also known as Nōsakusho 能作書
            • Hare 2008 (“The Three Courses”).
            • Rimer and Yamazaki 1983 (“The Three Elements in Composing a Play”).
            • Quinn, Shelley Fenno. “How to Write a Noh Play: Zeami’s Sandō.” MN 48:1 (1993), 53-88;  Quinn, Shelley Fenno. Developing Zeami: The Noh Actor’s Attunement in Practice (Honolulu: Hawai’i University Press, 2005), pp. 291-302 (as “The Three Paths”).
            • Sarugaku dangi 申楽談儀 (1430) (= Zeshi rokujū igo Sarugaku dangi 世子六十以後申楽談義)
            • Rimer and Yamazaki 1983 (“An Account of Zeami’s Reflections on Art,” pp. 172-256); Sieffert 1960.
            • de Poorter, Erika. Zeami’s Talks on Sarugaku. An Annotated Translation of the Sarugaku Dangi, with an Introduction on Zeami Motokiyo. 1986. Rpt: Amsterdam: Hotei Publishing, 2002.
            • Giroux, Sakae Murakami. Zeami et ses “Entriens sur le nō.” Paris: POF, 1991. 334 pp. [Includes translation of Sarugaku dangi]
            • Title also trans. as “Zeami’s Reflections on Nō” (PCCJL p. 263)
            • Shikadō 至花道 (1420)
            • Hare 2008 (“A Course to Attain the Flower”).
            • Rimer and Yamazaki 1983 (“The True Path to the Flower”); Benl 1961; Sieffert 1960 (“Le livre de la voie qui mène a la fleur”); Tsunoda et al., Sources of Japanese Tradition, 1958, 1:290-297 [Selections].
            • Bohner, H. “Seami, Buch der Höchsten Blume Weg (Shi-kwa-do-sho).” MOAG, 1943.
            • Shūdōsho 習道書 (1430) [Also read Shudōsho]
            • Hare 2008 (“Learning the Profession”).
            • Rimer and Yamazaki 1983 (“Learning the Way”). Konishi 2004: 344-357.
            • Shūgyoku tokka 拾玉得花 (1428)
            • Hare 2008 (“Pick Up a Jewel and Take the Flower in Hand”).
            • Rimer and Yamazaki 1983 (“Finding Gems and Gaining the Flower”).
            • Text: Konishi 2004: 302-328.
            • Yūgaku geifū goi
            • Title trans. as “Five Levels of Performance for the Joy of Art” (Rimer and Yamazaki 1983: xlix).
            • Yūgaku shūdō fūken 遊楽習道風見 (ca. 1423)
            • Hare 2008 (“An Effective Vision of Learning the Vocation of Fine Play in Performance”).
            • Rimer and Yamazaki 1983 (“Disciplines for the Joy of Art”); Benl 1961; Sieffert 1960 (Yūgaku shūdō kenpū sho, “Le livre de l’étude et de l’effet visuel des divertissements musicaux”). 
            • Text: Konishi 2004: 267-278 (with 習道 read shudō).
            • Zeshi rokujū igo Sarugaku dangi see Sarugaku dangi
            • See Rimer and Yamazaki 1983: 287-88 or Herail 1986: 82-83 for other translations. 
            • (3) general discussion (chiefly studies available online through JSTOR or public databases) 
            • Pinnington, Noel J. “Models of the Way in the Theory of Noh.” Japan Review 18 (2006), 29-55. (online)  // Quinn, Shelley Fenno. Developing Zeami: The Noh Actor’s Attunement in Practice (Honolulu: Hawai’i University Press, 2005). //  Pinnington, Noel J. “Crossed Paths: Zeami’s Transmission to Zenchiku.” MN 52: 2 (Summer, 1997), 201-234. // Yuasa, Michiko. “Riken no Ken: Zeami’s Theory of Acting and Theatrical Appreciation.” MN 42:3 (1987), 331-46. // Quinn, Shelley Fenno. “Dance and Chant in Zeami’s Dramaturgy: Building Blocks for a Theatre of Tone.” Asian Theatre Journal, 9: 2. (Autumn, 1992), pp. 201-214. // Nearman, Mark J. “Feeling in Relation to Acting: An Outline of Zeami’s Views.” Asian Theatre Journal 1: 1 (Spring, 1984), 40-51. // Yamazaki Masakazu. “The Aesthetics of Transformation: Zeami’s Dramatic Theories.” Trans. Susan Matisoff. JJS 7: 2 (Summer, 1981), 215-257. // Raz, Jacob. “The Actor and His Audience: Zeami’s Views on the Audience of the Noh.” MN 31: 3 (1976), 251-74. // Pilgrim, Richard. “Zeami and the Way of Nō.” History of Religions, 12: 2. (Nov., 1972), 136-148. // Tsubaki, Andrew T. “Zeami and the Transition of the Concept of Yūgen: A Note on Japanese Aesthetics.” The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 30: 1 (Autumn, 1971), 55-67. // Pilgrim, Richard B. “Some Aspects of Kokoro in Zeami.” MN 24: 4 (1969), 393-401. // Watsuji Tetsuro. Trans. David A. Dilworth. “Yōkyoku ni arawareta rinri shisō. Japanese Ethical Thought in the Noh Plays of the Muromachi Period. MN 24: 4  (1969), 467-498. // McKinnon, Richard N. “Zeami on the Art of Training.” HJAS 16: 1/2. (Jun., 1953), 200-225.
            • Zenkōji kikō 善光寺紀行

            • “Account of a Journey to the Zenkō-ji” by Priest Gyōe (尭恵) in Plutschow and Fukuda, Four Japanese Travel Diaries, pp. 77-84.
            • Webcat reads name of author as Gyōkei.
            • Zenrin Kokuhōki 善隣国宝記

              • Compliled by the Zen monk Zuikei Shūhō 瑞渓周鳳 and completed in 1470. The “first book-length chonicle of Japan’s foreign relations” (Vershuer 1999: 2).
              • Verschuer, Charlotte von. “Japan’s Foreign Relations 1200 to 1392 A.D.: A Translation from Zenrin Kokuhōki.” MN 57: 4 (2002), 413-45. 
              • Verschuer, Charlotte von. “Japan’s Foreign Relations 600 to 1200 A.D.: A Translation from Zenrin Kokuhōki. MN 54: 1 (1999), 1-39. [Excerpt trans. (pp. 13-39) includes “the middle section of the first of Shūhō’s three chapters, covering the years 600 to 1200.”]
              • Wang Yi-t’ung. Official Relations between China and Japan 1368-1549. Harvard Yenching Institute, 1953. [Excerpts tr.]


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              WORK IN PROGRESS. Last update: 2009/08/03
              Corrections and contributions most welcome.
              Michael Watson <watson[at]k.meijigakuin.ac.jp>
              Acknowledgements

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              作者:马光
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